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Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Asso

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Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2017, 21:15
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Question Stats:

58% (01:45) correct 42% (02:04) wrong based on 168 sessions

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Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association say that despite the widespread belief to the contrary, girls are just as likely as boys to have the reading impairment dyslexia. The new studies examined 450 children over a four-year period, from kindergarten through third grade. The research teams found that fewer than half the students referred to them for reading problems actually had them; and although the schools identified four times as many boys as girls as being dyslexic, independent testing by the research teams revealed that the impairment appeared in both sexes with equal frequency. Yet, over the past decades, elaborate research programs have been set up to find the biological basis for the presumed gender difference in developing dyslexia. Which of the following, if true, best explains the seeming contradiction outlined above between the new research and the conventional sex-linked view of dyslexia?

(A) Many boys who have dyslexia are not identified as suffering any learning disability.
(B) Many girls who do not have any learning impairment are incorrectly identified as having dyslexia.
(C) Earlier research was based entirely on subjects who were diagnosed by teachers as having reading problems.
(D) For years, the incidence of dyslexia has been underreported in school children of both genders.
(E) Learning disabilities are not likely to become evident until a child has reached the fourth grade.

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Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2017, 12:18
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(A) Many boys who have dyslexia are not identified as suffering any learning disability. - Paragraph talks about reading disability rather than learning disability
(B) Many girls who do not have any learning impairment are incorrectly identified as having dyslexia. - This is part of the premise. (The research teams found that fewer than half the students referred to them for reading problems actually had them)
(C) Earlier research was based entirely on subjects who were diagnosed by teachers as having reading problems. - This highlights why there is some possible difference in two results.
(D) For years, the incidence of dyslexia has been underreported in school children of both genders. - Not concerned. Does not explain anything about the difference.
(E) Learning disabilities are not likely to become evident until a child has reached the fourth grade. - This one is tricky. This seems to be a possible trap. But we already know as part of the premise that students with the disability are correctly identified. (The research teams found that fewer than half the students referred to them for reading problems actually had them)
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Re: Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Dec 2017, 14:39
the source of this question is from "master the gmat"

Hello, experts, can you help me with this question? I seem lost in this question. It is quite long, and I hardly how the answer connect directly with the argument.
Thank you.
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Re: Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 11:11
Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association say that despite the widespread belief to the contrary, girls are just as likely as boys to have the reading impairment dyslexia. The new studies examined 450 children over a four-year period, from kindergarten through third grade. The research teams found that fewer than half the students referred to them for reading problems actually had them; and although the schools identified four times as many boys as girls as being dyslexic, independent testing by the research teams revealed that the impairment appeared in both sexes with equal frequency. Yet, over the past decades, elaborate research programs have been set up to find the biological basis for the presumed gender difference in developing dyslexia.

Which of the following, if true, best explains the seeming contradiction outlined above between the new research and the conventional sex-linked view of dyslexia?
--On the basis of highlighted part we can say that earlier more boys were thought to have been suffering from dyslexia than were girls. So we can summarise the passage as following:
New theory: B=G
Old theory: B>G

(A) Many boys who have dyslexia are not identified as suffering any learning disability. -Out of scope. We are worried about reading abilities.
(B) Many girls who do not have any learning impairment are incorrectly identified as having dyslexia. -Out of scope. Same reason as in A.
(C) Earlier research was based entirely on subjects who were diagnosed by teachers as having reading problems. -Correct. The final sentence of the argument states that research programmes were set up to find biological basis for presumed gender difference. As per the argument we ought to find the option that helps us find the source of such pre-assumption.
(D) For years, the incidence of dyslexia has been underreported in school children of both genders. -If this option were true then older theory would have been wrong
(E) Learning disabilities are not likely to become evident until a child has reached the fourth grade. -Out of scope
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Re: Studies recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Asso &nbs [#permalink] 16 Jan 2018, 11:11
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