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The medical profession is not in agreement about how to

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Senior Manager
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Joined: 31 Oct 2011
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Kudos [?]: 1315 [0], given: 18

The medical profession is not in agreement about how to [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2012, 14:48
7
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BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

62% (01:11) correct 38% (01:28) wrong based on 323 sessions

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The medical profession is not in agreement about how to treat
snakebites; physicians are unsure about how much antiserum
to use, and there is controversy over
the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over
B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about
D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over
E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is



Should "sure" or "unsure" be used with "about" ?

I googled this Q, and some people say that "sure" or "unsure" has to have "about" like A.
But I saw examples that did not use "about" with "sure".
Ex) Ask me if you're not sure how to do it. I am not sure whether I should tell you this.

The rule that "sure" has to have "about" is right? I doubt it.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Kudos [?]: 1315 [0], given: 18

Director
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Posts: 672

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Re: PT #9 SC 11 The medical profession is not in agreement about [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2012, 17:42
+1 for A.

When your construction is ... not sure about "something" and that something is plain, vanila statement then you need "about" as preposition. However if something is in form of a question or an ability (how to do something) then sure can omit the [about].

You have to also look at "[physicians] have a controversy about". This is incorrect usage. You do not have controversy about something; "there is a controversy about something".

Crick

Kudos [?]: 204 [0], given: 37

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Re: PT #9 SC 11 The medical profession is not in agreement about [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2012, 02:41
Quote:
A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over
B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about
D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over
E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is


unsure is better than not sure.
to have a controversy about??? Doesn't make sense.
This should rule out B, C, and E.
Not sure as to is just wrong and wordy construction.

Answer is surely A.


Quote:
Should "sure" or "unsure" be used with "about" ?

I googled this Q, and some people say that "sure" or "unsure" has to have "about" like A.
But I saw examples that did not use "about" with "sure".
Ex) Ask me if you're not sure how to do it. I am not sure whether I should tell you this.

The rule that "sure" has to have "about" is right? I doubt it.



Are you sure about your answer? --> I believe this is a valid construction.
Are you unsure about your answer? --> I believe this is a valid construction too.
If you refer to my methodology above we didnt really need sure and about to answer this question correctly. The real reason why about is wrong in this sentence is when you look at it with relation to the word "controversy" and not the word "sure".

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Re: The medical profession is not in agreement about how to [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2014, 07:58
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KUDOS
eybrj2 wrote:
The medical profession is not in agreement about how to treat
snakebites; physicians are unsure about how much antiserum
to use, and there is controversy over
the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over
B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about
D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over
E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is



Should "sure" or "unsure" be used with "about" ?

I googled this Q, and some people say that "sure" or "unsure" has to have "about" like A.
But I saw examples that did not use "about" with "sure".
Ex) Ask me if you're not sure how to do it. I am not sure whether I should tell you this.

The rule that "sure" has to have "about" is right? I doubt it.

My way of approaching question-

-controversy is "over" something.. not "about" something
so down to (A) and (D)
-(A) is more clear and concise

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Director
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Re: The medical profession is not in agreement about how to [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2014, 23:51
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BOOKMARKED
eybrj2 wrote:
The medical profession is not in agreement about how to treat
snakebites; physicians are unsure about how much antiserum
to use, and there is controversy over
the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over
B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about
D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over
E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is


Should "sure" or "unsure" be used with "about" ?

I googled this Q, and some people say that "sure" or "unsure" has to have "about" like A.
But I saw examples that did not use "about" with "sure".
Ex) Ask me if you're not sure how to do it. I am not sure whether I should tell you this.

The rule that "sure" has to have "about" is right? I doubt it.



The medical profession is not in agreement about how to treat
snakebites; physicians are unsure about how much antiserum
to use, and there is controversy over
the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

"how much antiserum to use" is used as one entity.
Also, "unsure about" is parallel to "controversy over" - Hence the parallelism requires "about"

A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over

It's a very clear construction.

Structure:
Physicians are unsure about X and there is controversy over Y
X= how much antiserum to use
Y= the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
This construction may imply that physicians are unsure about two things
1- use of antiserum
2- have a controversy about

Pronoun "they" is redundant.
Compare- I'm not sure about how much oil to use. / I'm not sure about how much oil I should use. The latter version is unnecessarily wordy.


On GMAT "should" is tested in regard to subjunctives. It can also be used to show an obligations. However the context here only points to the right quantity to be use.

Also, "controversy about" is unidiomatic. Correct idiom is - "controversy over"


C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about

D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over

E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is



Hope this helps!
Dolly Sharma
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Kudos [?]: 637 [0], given: 6

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Re: The medical profession is not in agreement about how to [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2014, 11:07
eybrj2 wrote:
The medical profession is not in agreement about how to treat
snakebites; physicians are unsure about how much antiserum
to use, and there is controversy over
the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over
B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about
D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over
E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is



Should "sure" or "unsure" be used with "about" ?

I googled this Q, and some people say that "sure" or "unsure" has to have "about" like A.
But I saw examples that did not use "about" with "sure".
Ex) Ask me if you're not sure how to do it. I am not sure whether I should tell you this.

The rule that "sure" has to have "about" is right? I doubt it.


Though I answered this question incorrectly , I now understand that this is a mining error question.

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Re: The medical profession is not in agreement about how to [#permalink]

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Re: The medical profession is not in agreement about how to [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2017, 12:55
eybrj2 wrote:
The medical profession is not in agreement about how to treat
snakebites; physicians are unsure about how much antiserum
to use, and there is controversy over
the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over
B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about
D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over
E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is



Should "sure" or "unsure" be used with "about" ?

I googled this Q, and some people say that "sure" or "unsure" has to have "about" like A.
But I saw examples that did not use "about" with "sure".
Ex) Ask me if you're not sure how to do it. I am not sure whether I should tell you this.

The rule that "sure" has to have "about" is right? I doubt it.

The medical profession is not in agreement about how to treat
snakebites; physicians are unsure about how much antiserum
to use, and there is controversy over the relative merits of surgery and antivenins.

A) unsure about how much antiserum to use, and there is controversy over: I THINK A IS CORRECT
B) not sure how much antiserum they should use and have a controversy about
C) unsure how much antiserum they should use, and they have controversy about
D) not sure as to how much antiserum they should be using, and there is a controversy over
E) unsure about how much antiserum should be used, and they have a controversy as to what is

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 96

Re: The medical profession is not in agreement about how to   [#permalink] 11 Dec 2017, 12:55
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