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The most successful economies have been, and will continue

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The most successful economies have been, and will continue [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2017, 07:56
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  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

54% (01:39) correct 46% (01:51) wrong based on 284 sessions

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The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to
develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort. Europe as a whole is in a weaker position: there is a shortage of skilled labor trained to use the new technologies, and there are not enough scientists able to develop and apply the technology. However, even in Japan there is a shortage of technically qualified people, and, like most European countries, Japan has far too many workers qualified to perform only menial tasks.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the passage?

(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers.

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success.

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor.

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies.

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries.

Source: LSAT

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The most successful economies have been, and will continue [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 23 Sep 2017, 00:06
broall wrote:
The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to
develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort. Europe as a whole is in a weaker position: there is a shortage of skilled labor trained to use the new technologies, and there are not enough scientists able to develop and apply the technology. However, even in Japan there is a shortage of technically qualified people, and, like most European countries, Japan has far too many workers qualified to perform only menial tasks.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the passage?

(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers.

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success.

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor.

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies.

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries.

Source: LSAT


(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers. [There is no comparison between scientists and engineers in the passage]

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success. [There is no evidence provided in the passage that Japan is the best, however there is definitely a hint about Japan being the model]

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor. [The passage mentions about training for as many people as possible, so narrow base of highly skilled labor can not be basis of success]

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies. [The first line of the passage suggest that people need to be trained to apply new technologies, hence if Europe wants to be more successful and it need to train more people in new technology]

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries. [There is no comparison of success of European economies with that of most countries in the world]

Answer is D.
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Originally posted by GMATisLovE on 22 Sep 2017, 12:35.
Last edited by GMATisLovE on 23 Sep 2017, 00:06, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: The most successful economies have been, and will continue [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2017, 13:17
A- no comparison of scientists to engineers. Wrong
C- More no. of skilled ppl,better the economy.so narrow base is wrong
D- Passage says nation needs to train ppl in skills required to develop new technology. Not to train people in new technology.Wrong
E-Nowhere mentioned in passage.Wrong.
B-correct by POE.
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Re: The most successful economies have been, and will continue [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2017, 20:07
Jabjagotabhisavera wrote:
broall wrote:
The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to
develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort. Europe as a whole is in a weaker position: there is a shortage of skilled labor trained to use the new technologies, and there are not enough scientists able to develop and apply the technology. However, even in Japan there is a shortage of technically qualified people, and, like most European countries, Japan has far too many workers qualified to perform only menial tasks.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the passage?

(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers.

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success.

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor.

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies.

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries.

Source: LSAT


(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers. [There is no comparison between scientists and engineers in the passage]

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success. [There is no evidence provided in the passage that Japan is the best, however there is definitely a hint about Japan being the model]

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor. [The passage mentions about training for as many people as possible, so narrow base of highly skilled labor can not be basis of success]

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies. [The first line of the passage suggest that people need to be trained to apply new technologies, hence if Europe wants to be more successful and it need to train more people in new technology]

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries. [There is no comparison of success of European economies with that of most countries in the world]

Answer is D.


I am not convinced behind your reasoning for eliminating Option B.
Passage says :
"The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort."
We can infer that Japan is a successful economy because it is a model for the sort of training mentioned.

Now, the passage points out the limitations even in Japan's economy. Hence, we can infer that Japan is NOT the best standard for successful economy.
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Re: The most successful economies have been, and will continue [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2017, 18:47
1
fmik7894 wrote:
Jabjagotabhisavera wrote:
broall wrote:
The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to
develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort. Europe as a whole is in a weaker position: there is a shortage of skilled labor trained to use the new technologies, and there are not enough scientists able to develop and apply the technology. However, even in Japan there is a shortage of technically qualified people, and, like most European countries, Japan has far too many workers qualified to perform only menial tasks.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the passage?

(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers.

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success.

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor.

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies.

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries.

Source: LSAT


(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers. [There is no comparison between scientists and engineers in the passage]

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success. [There is no evidence provided in the passage that Japan is the best, however there is definitely a hint about Japan being the model]

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor. [The passage mentions about training for as many people as possible, so narrow base of highly skilled labor can not be basis of success]

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies. [The first line of the passage suggest that people need to be trained to apply new technologies, hence if Europe wants to be more successful and it need to train more people in new technology]

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries. [There is no comparison of success of European economies with that of most countries in the world]

Answer is D.


I am not convinced behind your reasoning for eliminating Option B.
Passage says :
"The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort."
We can infer that Japan is a successful economy because it is a model for the sort of training mentioned.

Now, the passage points out the limitations even in Japan's economy. Hence, we can infer that Japan is NOT the best standard for successful economy.


hi

apart from strong language, choice B is exaggerated. The issue is not with measuring economic success against any country but with defining successful economies

hope this helps
thanks

cheers through the kudos button if this helps
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Re: The most successful economies have been, and will continue [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2017, 02:45
1
broall wrote:
The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to
develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort. Europe as a whole is in a weaker position: there is a shortage of skilled labor trained to use the new technologies, and there are not enough scientists able to develop and apply the technology. However, even in Japan there is a shortage of technically qualified people, and, like most European countries, Japan has far too many workers qualified to perform only menial tasks.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the passage?

(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers.

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success.

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor.

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies.

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries.

Source: LSAT


we can read the stimulus as saying that if you're one of the "most" successful economies, then you are training as many people as possible in these technologies. Since it then says that Europe isn't training enough people, we can say that Europe is not one of the "most" successful economies. So we can infer that to become one of the "most" successful, it would have to train more people.

How can we say this is necessary for Europe to be "more" successful? I agree, we can't really infer this, but this answer stinks way less than the other four:

(A) is totally out, it never compares engineers vs. researchers.

(B) is out because all we know is that Japan is a model for this kind of training, so if anything it is a good comparison.

(C) is incorrect because the stimulus never says whether Japan's economy is actually successful.

(E) is totally out of scope; we have no clue how Europe stacks up to the competition.

So (D) is the best of the bunch.
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Re: The most successful economies have been, and will continue [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2018, 18:17
broall wrote:
The most successful economies have been, and will continue to be, those that train as many people as possible in the human skills required to research, to
develop, and to apply new technology. Japan is a model for this sort of training effort. Europe as a whole is in a weaker position: there is a shortage of skilled labor trained to use the new technologies, and there are not enough scientists able to develop and apply the technology. However, even in Japan there is a shortage of technically qualified people, and, like most European countries, Japan has far too many workers qualified to perform only menial tasks.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the passage?

(A) There is a greater worldwide shortage of research scientists than there is of engineers.

(B) Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success.

(C) Japan’s successful economy depends upon an uncommonly narrow base of highly skilled labor.

(D) To be economically more successful, Europe needs to train more people in the new technologies.

(E) European countries have economies that are more successful than those of most other countries.

Source: LSAT


1. Successful economies are those that train as many people as possible to research, to develop, and to apply new technology.
2. Japan is a model for this sort of training.

Hence this inference - Japan is not the best country against which to measure a country’s economic success - is incorrect. Also note, the passage compares the shortage of technically qualified people and people performing menial tasks. So there is no real comparison between Japan and Europe.
Re: The most successful economies have been, and will continue   [#permalink] 26 Feb 2018, 18:17
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