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The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year

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The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year around, and a group of voles living together consists primarily of an extended family, often including two or more litters. Voles commonly live in large groups from late autumn to winter; from spring through early autumn, however, most voles live in far smaller groups. The seasonal variation in groups size can probably be explained by a seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest support for the explanation above?

(A) It is the spring and in the early summer that prairie vole communities generally contain the highest proportion of young voles.

(B) Prairie vole populations vary dramatically in size from year to year.

(C) The prairie vole subsists primarily on broad-leaved plants that are abundant only in spring.

(D) Winters in prairie vole's habitat are often harsh, with temperatures that drop well below freezing.

(E) Snakes, a major predator of young prairie voles, are active only from spring through early autumn.

Originally posted by nitinneha on 18 Mar 2007, 18:23.
Last edited by Bunuel on 20 Nov 2018, 02:24, edited 4 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2014, 02:22
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neo656 wrote:
I too am stuck with the reasoning behind the answer option. :|



Hi,

The key word here is "Breeds year around"- In this sentence it is stated that the voles breed throughout the year. If snakes are only active from spring to early autumn, they will not be able to kill the young voles born during late autumn or in winter.

so the group is bigger in winter.

Hope it helps.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2007, 19:45
The seasonal variation in groups size can probably be explained by a seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.

Snakes, a major predator of young prairie voles, or active only from spring thru early autumn.

E
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2007, 20:21
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agree with E,

D would be wrong because just because the winter is harsh does not mean that will cause the prairies to die
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2008, 00:35
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I say E.

The argument implies that the variation in group size is related to the mortality rate in young voles. The groups are smallest from spring to early autumn. If snakes that eat young voles are only active from spring to early autumn, this would cause smaller groups during that time due to the fact that young voles are dying (being eaten). Therefore, this would support the argument.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2008, 01:26
Why do prarie vols live in smaller groups from spring through early autumn? They get eaten by snakes!

E is the best answer.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2009, 06:33
Friend, One Request
pls mention GPREP Q in subject line(If you are knowingly posting GPrep Q)

Btw,good Q indeed :)
we have to justify/support the explanation here
How the seasonal variation in mortality among young voles??

Its D
because Snakes are killing the young voles during "early summer" period.
thanks.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2009, 15:34
reply2spg wrote:
The prairle vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year-round, and a group of voles living together consists primarily of an extended family, often including two or more litters. Voles commonly live in large groups from late autumn through winter; from spring through early autumn, however, most voles live in far smaller groups. The seasonal variation in group size can probably be explained by a seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.

Which of the followings, if true, provides the strongest support for the explanation offered?

1. It is in the spring and early summer that prairle vole communities generally contain the highest proportion of young voles.
2. Prairle vole populations vary dramatically in size from year to year
3. The prairle vole subsists primarily on bread-leaved plants that are abundant only in spring
4. Winters in the prairle voles’ habitat are often harsh, with temperatures that drop well below freezing.
5. Snakes, a major predator of young prairle vole, are active only from spring through early summer


E is the best choice, because we are concerned here about the mortality among young voles, which is the main cause of the seasonal variation of Mortality among voles.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2009, 21:37
i think ans should be D, because the groups are large from aut to winter and spring to Autumn, the only period remain for smaller group is winter to spring. reason given in D clearly explains this, while the period in option E is when the group are large.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2009, 17:57
reply2spg wrote:
The prairle vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year-round, and a group of voles living together consists primarily of an extended family, often including two or more litters. Voles commonly live in large groups from late autumn through winter; from spring through early autumn, however, most voles live in far smaller groups. The seasonal variation in group size can probably be explained by a seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.

Which of the followings, if true, provides the strongest support for the explanation offered?

1. It is in the spring and early summer that prairle vole communities generally contain the highest proportion of young voles.
2. Prairle vole populations vary dramatically in size from year to year
3. The prairle vole subsists primarily on bread-leaved plants that are abundant only in spring
4. Winters in the prairle voles’ habitat are often harsh, with temperatures that drop well below freezing.
5. Snakes, a major predator of young prairle vole, are active only from spring through early summer

It's a gmat prep indeed and OA is E. Mortality among young voles from spring through early summer because Snakes - a major predator of young prairle vole, are active only during this time
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2011, 06:38
kotela wrote:
with E,

Can anyone explain how C was thrown out?



We need to support mortality as one of the reason for seasonal variation in group size

C is not showing coz of mortality

E is showing so E it is
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2013, 06:59
Why is D not correct in this? Is it because D does not mention an explicit link between harshness and infant mortality?
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2013, 09:51
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mydreammba wrote:
with E,

Can anyone explain how C was thrown out?


C is wrong because if there is no food also older rodents will die.
D Ok harsh winter older rodents can die too.
Only E refers to a cause of death for young rodents
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2013, 10:26
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quiet888 wrote:
The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year-round, and a group of voles living together consists primarily of an extended family, often including two or more litters. Voles commonly live in large groups from late autumn through to winter; from spring through early autumn, however, most voles live in far smaller groups. The seasonal variation in group size can probably be explained by seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest support for the explanation offered?


Correct answer will provide the reason why young voles die more often from spring through early autumn. (This is the explanation offered.)
Quote:
A. It is in the spring and early summer that prairie vole communities generally contain the highest proportion of young voles.

Proportions within the communities of voles are irrelevant.

Quote:
B. Prairie vole populations vary dramatically in size from year to year.

Does it explain why more than usual voles die from spring through early autumn?

Quote:
C. The prairie vole subsists primarily on broad-leaved plants that are abundant only in spring.

This piece of information weakens the explanation: If there is more food to feed on, the voles should proliferate. That would result in an increased number of voles.

Quote:
D. Winters in the prairie voles' habitat are often harsh, with temperatures that drop well below freezing.

The temperatures in winter are irrelevant. Many ways to circumvent this hint.

Quote:
E. Snakes, a major predator of young prairie voles, are active only from spring through early autumn.

Does it explain why more than usual voles die from spring through early autumn?
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2013, 15:24
C. snakes wake in spring and it small rodents.
B. Says only that there is a variation in the population not why this happens

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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2013, 01:49
I did pick E but C was very tempting can someone explain? Thanks
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2013, 07:06
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jaituteja wrote:
OA is E...Why are other options wrong??
Can someone explain...!!!!


We have to provide support to the claim:
The seasonal variation in group size can probably be explained by seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.
We have to connect seasonal variation==> seasonal variation in mortality somehow (also note that the conclusion talks about "among young voles").
Winter = high
Spring through early autumn = low

A. It is in the spring and early summer that prairie vole communities generally contain the highest proportion of young voles.
This goes against the passage, who says that in spring the young voles should diminish.
B. Prairie vole populations vary dramatically in size from year to year.
By how much the size varies does not helps us in establishing our point.
C. The prairie vole subsists primarily on broad-leaved plants that are abundant only in spring.
Keep an eye on the conclusion we are trying to prove: our focus must be on the young voles.
We can infer something like "so the population is likely to increase in spring" reading C, which anyway is against the passage.
D. Winters in the prairie voles' habitat are often harsh, with temperatures that drop well below freezing.
Keep in mind that during winter the number are higher and during spring through early autumn the numbers are lower. If we know that despite harsh condition the population grows, we still do not have anything to connect YOUNG VOLES to the seasonal variation in mortality.
E. Snakes, a major predator of young prairie voles, are active only from spring through early autumn.
Look at E: it has all the key words (young prairie voles, spring through early autumn) and supports our conclusion stated above.

Snakes, a major predator of young prairie voles, are active only from spring through early autumn. => so during this period it feeds on young voles mainly, so we have connected
seasonal variation in group size ==> seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2013, 07:22
Thanks for the explanations... KUDOS..!!!!

I have a doubt and need clarification..

"Voles commonly live in large groups from late autumn through to winter; from spring through early autumn, however, most voles live in far smaller groups."

This only states that the group size was reduced.Maybe, the family consists of 10 members from late autumn through winter and got separated forming smaller 5 groups each of 2 member from spring through early autumn.. Just as we have nuclear and joint families.
This does not mean the voles were low or high... Maybe their number was same....

I need clarity on this...
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2013, 07:41
jaituteja wrote:
Thanks for the explanations... KUDOS..!!!!

I have a doubt and need clarification..

"Voles commonly live in large groups from late autumn through to winter; from spring through early autumn, however, most voles live in far smaller groups."

This only states that the group size was reduced.Maybe, the family consists of 10 members from late autumn through winter and got separated forming smaller 5 groups each of 2 member from spring through early autumn.. Just as we have nuclear and joint families.
This does not mean the voles were low or high... Maybe their number was same....

I need clarity on this...


Your reasoning is correct, that can happen BUT if that's the case we would not be able to prove that:
The seasonal variation in group size can probably be explained by seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.
as we are asked to. Your point could work like a weakener option. We have to prove what the conclusion states (a thing that E does), not to weaken it...

Also note that we are not allowed to reduce the number as much as we like because
a group consists primarily of an extended family, often including two or more litters. So the average group consists of an extended family and litters, their number grows and then declines, and we are asked to connect this variation to the mortality of the young voles. Nothing more.

Hope I've explained myself well
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2013, 07:52
Zarrolou wrote:
jaituteja wrote:
Thanks for the explanations... KUDOS..!!!!


Your reasoning is correct, that can happen BUT if that's the case we would not be able to prove that:
The seasonal variation in group size can probably be explained by seasonal variation in mortality among young voles.
as we are asked to. Your point could work like a weakener option. We have to prove what the conclusion states (a thing that E does), not to weaken it...

Also note that we are not allowed to reduce the number as much as we like because
a group consists primarily of an extended family, often including two or more litters. So the average group consists of an extended family and litters, their number grows and then declines, and we are asked to connect this variation to the mortality of the young voles. Nothing more.

Hope I've explained myself well


You have explained really well brother..!!!

I agree that we need to focus on the conclusion... I was just trying to explore the argument..

I was pre-thinking that if rodents were living in small groups, they were not able to gather much food or any other requirement,leading to death of young voles.(because of food scarcity), etc..
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Re: The prairie vole, a small North American grassland rodent, breeds year &nbs [#permalink] 23 Jul 2013, 07:52

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