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The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to

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The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2015, 09:31
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The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to many an implication that he will not seek re-election to his current office.

A) an implication that
B) to make the implication
C) to imply that
D) as if implying
E) to make implicit that

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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2015, 13:00
Seems to imply is the correct idiom; therefore C
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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2015, 07:49
But there is already a "to" preposition after seem. I thought the word after "many" should be a noun. Daagh, Would you pls elaborate that? Thank you.
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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2015, 09:48
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If a verb follows the word ‘to’ then it is an infinitive. If a noun or noun phrase follows the word ‘to’, then it is a preposition

Because the word ‘to’ performs different functions in different contexts, they can appear together in the same clause.

e.g. I went to Delhi to see the President—‘to Delhi’ is a preposition, because Delhi is a noun; to see is an infinitive, because see is a verb.

C: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to many to imply that he will not seek re-election to his current office.

‘To many’ is a prepositional phrase, Because ‘many’ is a noun here standing for many people. ( for ex: the number 13 is believed to bring bad luck to many)
‘To imply’ is an infinitive, because ‘imply’ is a verb;
It might be a bit awkward to see an infinitive and a prepositional phrase together, but it is ok
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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2016, 20:35
daagh wrote:
If a verb follows the word ‘to’ then it is an infinitive. If a noun or noun phrase follows the word ‘to’, then it is a preposition

Because the word ‘to’ performs different functions in different contexts, they can appear together in the same clause.

e.g. I went to Delhi to see the President—‘to Delhi’ is a preposition, because Delhi is a noun; to see is an infinitive, because see is a verb.

C: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to many to imply that he will not seek re-election to his current office.

‘To many’ is a prepositional phrase, Because ‘many’ is a noun here standing for many people. ( for ex: the number 13 is believed to bring bad luck to many)
‘To imply’ is an infinitive, because ‘imply’ is a verb;
It might be a bit awkward to see an infinitive and a prepositional phrase together, but it is ok


Why is option A wrong? Please explain
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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2016, 03:01
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There is a degree of difference between to imply and implication. If you specifically intend to mean indirectly or a give a cue about something, the there is a purpose involved and in those cases, we use the infinitive 'to imply'. On the contrary, an implication is a mere phenomenon. without an intended purpose.

In the given case, Since the purpose of recommending the congressman seemed to give a hint about his possible withdrawal from the scene, the infinitive in C is conveying the meaning more vividly than the noun in A
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The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2017, 03:49
Harley1980 wrote:
The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to many an implication that he will not seek re-election to his current office.

A) an implication that
B) to make the implication
C) to imply that
D) as if implying
E) to make implicit that


Hi

I read somewhere that a subjective pronoun can not refer to a possessive antecedent. Here "he" seems to refer to "Senator" which is written in possessive form (Senator's). Is is OK?

Or should I not care about it as it is not mentioned under underline portion of the sentence?

Experts, please clear my doubt.
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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2018, 11:58
the pattern in B looks more familiar than the pattern in C does. To put it simply, "seem to sb + sth" is the pattern. However, in B, "in that" is not idiomatic while C is direct. Hence, the answer is C.
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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2018, 23:52

OE Magoosh:



Split #1: the noun/verb/adjective split. Choices (A) & (B) use the noun form, “implication,” and indeed, these are longer, wordier, and less direct than they could be; these are not correct. Choice (C) uses the verb “imply.” Choice (D) uses the participle “implying.” Choice (E) uses the adjective “implicit,” which changes the meaning significantly, so this is incorrect.

Split #2: “that” — in colloquial speech, we often drop the word “that” in casual conversation — “He said she was angry.” On the GMAT, though, this is unacceptable. The formal language of the GMAT demands the word “that.” Choices (B) & (D) drop the word “that” before the clause, so these two are incorrect.

Because of these, the only possible answer is (C).
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Re: The Senator's warm recommendation of the popular Congressman seemed to   [#permalink] 18 May 2018, 23:52
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