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The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way

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The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.


A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable

B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable

C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable

D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully

E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable



I always don't understand this point of grammar. Gravity waves do not interact with matter like electromagnetic waves. Clarify on what this means, I think it means it does not interact with matter that is like electromagnetic waves.

Gravity waves do not interact with matter like electromagnetic waves do interact with matter.

Do you cut out the "interact with matter" part to make it more readable. Is that what people do who speak English?

You have to understand stuffed bears are foreigners like someone from Russia or India. :lol: :lol:

Originally posted by Curly05 on 26 Jul 2003, 06:33.
Last edited by Bunuel on 10 Jul 2018, 04:07, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2003, 21:34
3
(B) is right. Technically, the word "hopefully" is an adverb form of the word "hopeful," which is used to describe one's state of mind about a particular thing.

For example:

JP is hopeful that he will get a good score on the GMAT.
JP thought hopefully about his future GMAT score.

But:

JP will, it is hoped, receive a high score on the GMAT.

or:

It is hoped that JP will receive a high score on the GMAT.
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Re: SC gravity  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2008, 09:45
2
1
chan4312 wrote:
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.

(A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable
(B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable
(C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable
(D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully
(E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable


Pls give explanation.

HOPEFULLY is always wrong in GMAT
reject A,C,D
we are left with B and E ,here E is wrong such as EM wavs do is wrong .such as idiom is followed by examples hence do will be hanging the without any referrent.
B is the best choice among the lot
IMO B
OA pls !! :) :?:
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Re: SC gravity  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2008, 09:48
Thats right! Hopefully is almost never correct as per GMAT standards. The answer option B looks the best, as option E has a wrong such as usage.
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Re: SC gravity  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2008, 10:14
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dushver wrote:
Thats right! Hopefully is almost never correct as per GMAT standards. The answer option B looks the best, as option E has a wrong such as usage.


Why hopefully is wrong in GMAT??? any reason..

hopefully is adverb modifies enable... looks perfect.

On second look, C and D are out because improper comparision.


which do not interact wiht matter like EM waves
= G waves .. interact wiht matter like EM waves.
(comparing "G waves interact" with "EM waves") --> C and D are out

Between A and B.
I am not conviced why hopefully is wrong..
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Re: SC gravity  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2008, 07:48
3
x2suresh wrote:
dushver wrote:
Thats right! Hopefully is almost never correct as per GMAT standards. The answer option B looks the best, as option E has a wrong such as usage.


Why hopefully is wrong in GMAT??? any reason..

hopefully is adverb modifies enable... looks perfect.

On second look, C and D are out because improper comparision.


which do not interact wiht matter like EM waves
= G waves .. interact wiht matter like EM waves.
(comparing "G waves interact" with "EM waves") --> C and D are out

Between A and B.
I am not conviced why hopefully is wrong..


hi x2suresh
check out this link which talks about incorrect usage of hopefully.

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/hopefully.aspx

hopefully ,this link helps ... :shock: oops
i hope ,this link helps :-D
do check out this too :
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hopefully

hopeful cannot be paralleled with i hope
hopefully means certainly (a sort of making prediction)
"Hopefully, I will win the Nobel Prize in Literature." -> incorrect this is kind of statement in which the person is unsure
“Hopefully, I will win the Nobel Prize in Literature, irregardless.” -> correct -> the person is hopeful

i hope u got the meaning y hopefully is incorrect usage in geneal when used for meaning "i hope or it is hoped "
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Re: SC gravity  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2008, 09:29
1
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.

(A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable
'hopefully' is acting like a sentence adverb..modifying entire sentence...But, adverbs should modify only verbs..use of hopefully is not correct here.
(B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable
hold it
(C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable
comparing an action with a subject
(D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully
comparing an action with a subject
(E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable
such as is used to illustrate a set of related items. its usage is not correct.

Thanks spriya and everybody...

OA is B
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Re: Gravity waves  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2010, 07:43
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The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.

A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable - 'hopefully' is almost always wrong in GMAT
B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable - CORRECT
C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable - 'hopefully' is almost always wrong in GMAT
D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully - 'hopefully' is almost always wrong in GMAT
E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable - 'such as' is used to give examples
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Re: Gravity waves  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2010, 08:05
I pick B because I look at your question about Will.

I was really torn between A, B though.

After reading this by BlindVision, I'm a bit more clear now:

"This once-useful adverb meaning "with hope" has been distorted and is now widely used to mean "I hope" or "it is to be hoped." Such use is not merely wrong, it is silly. To say, "Hopefully, I'll leave on the noon plane" is to talk nonsense. Do you mean you'll leave on the noon plane in a hopeful frame of mind? Or do you mean you hope you'll leave on the noon plane? Whichever you mean, you haven't said it clearly. Although the word in its new, free-floating capacity may be pleasurable and even useful to many, it offends the ear of many others, who do not like to see words dulled or eroded, particularly when the erosion leads to ambiguity, softness, or nonsense."

http://grammar.about.com/od/grammarfaq/f/sentadvqa.htm
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Re: The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2018, 21:09
Can u please provide reasoning to eliminate A
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Re: The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2018, 23:03
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harikrish wrote:
Can u please provide reasoning to eliminate A

A is eliminated because of the incorrect usage. On GMAT, we generally try to avoid the word "hopefully" especially when it is not acting as a clear adverb and is used in place of " I hope that"
For example, "Hopefully, he will reach my place by noon"
Here, Hopefully is incorrectly used. Rather, it should have been I hope that...
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The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2018, 11:27
Curly05 wrote:
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.


A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable

B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable

C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable

D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully

E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable





hello generis, :) how do we call a grammatical construction or style :? in option B ? i prefered A over B :) cause i thought B was akward and wordy. :?
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Re: The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2018, 20:20
Can some explain if B is run on or not?
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The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2018, 19:44
2
dave13 wrote:
Curly05 wrote:
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.


A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable
B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable
C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable
D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully
E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable

hello generis, :) how do we call a grammatical construction or style :? in option B ? i prefered A over B :) cause i thought B was akward and wordy. :?

Hi dave13 ,

Well, I kinda understand about the "awkward and wordy" part.
On the other hand, if you weren't sure about the word "hopefully"—and many people aren't—pick "hopefully" to eliminate as long as you're sure that "it is hoped" is grammatically correct.

What if a test taker is not sure whether a word in one answer is correct and the other answer
sounds wordy and awkward? Choose the "wordy" and "awkward" answer. "Wordy and awkward" sentences aren't great. But they aren't wrong. ;)

You have asked a really hard question.
Style and rhetoric questions delve into difficult material. I have no doubt you can handle it.

What you see is called "splitting the verb."

The auxiliary verb "will" is split from the main verb "enable" by the adverb it is hoped probably for two reasons:

1) to qualify, explicitly, an extraordinary assertion (think about seeing the formation of black holes!); and

2) to maintain flow. Stylistically, the phrase does not work very well elsewhere.

This construction looks strange to many.
If you read enough stuffy or scientific literature, the phrase does not seem strange. (Guilty as charged.)

Such splitting is allowed and often used to add particular emphasis or to avoid strange phrasing.

• The sentence could be rewritten this way:

(1) It is hoped that the use of gravity waves, which do not present the problems that X do, will enable astronomers to study Y and Z.

The author wants to emphasize the importance of gravity waves' potential to make it possible for human beings to witness the formation of black holes and neutron stars (Y and Z).
(S)he partly accomplishes her goal by keeping what astronomers will be able to study at the end of the sentence.
(In English, readers naturally stress the end of a sentence most of the time.)

The phrase's placement in (1), however, puts too much stress on "it is hoped."
The sentence leads with a hypothetical, and one without an agent at that.

• So let's try a different placement of the adverbial phrase "it is hoped."

(2) The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, will enable, it is hoped, astronomers to study Y and Z. :(

Unless the object is long or complex, an adverb should not intrude between a verb (enable) and the verb's object (astronomers).

Now the adverb is clumsy and a buttinsky.

This writer wants to talk about radical horizons.
The connection between "enable" and astronomers" is blocked. An adverb between verb and object is usually ungrammatical.

• Let's move the phrase again.

(3) The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, it is hoped will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars. :(

The author wants to focus on the potential for astronomers to study Y and Z.
(S)he has to qualify an assertion, but in this sentence the phrase disconnects the logical connection between waves . . . will enable.

Further, if we place it is hoped after the comma and before the auxiliary verb phrase, that placement suggests an antecedent of "it."
No such antecedent exists. "It" is a dummy placeholder.
The phrase draws unearned attention in this third case.

• We have a better choice of placement. The author qualifies an exciting assertion in the correct manner
by suggesting the uncertainty without harping on it.


The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.
In rhetorical and syntactic effect, the reader discovers an exciting prospect.

This prospect (future, declarative) WILL, it is hoped, ENABLE.
Those two capitalized words draw our attention.

The placement of "it is hoped," between a declared future and a Good Thing, allows us to absorb a sense of measured determination (the scientists are confident about but not guaranteeing a result).

Black holes and neutron stars fascinate me.

Even with many commas in its sentence, the placement of "will, it is hoped, enable"
mimics a human being who waits with bated breath.
------------
And if none of that explanation satisfies you, rely on POE. :-D

Split #1: LIKE is incorrect
The cue is "in the way." That very phrase is a good way to test whether we should use the word "as" instead of "like."

We need AS _____s DO.

Omit C and D

Split #2: SUCH AS is for examples
SUCH AS . . . ______s DO is incorrect

Omit E

Split #3 - Hopefully is an adverb. What, the gravity waves will be hopeful when they enable astronomers to witness the formation of black holes? I don't think so.
Correct: I hope, they hope, scientists hope
Correct: it is hoped
Incorrect: hopefully (in this case)

Omit A.

One note of caution: splitting verbs with adverbs can produce confusion. This excellent synopsis that deals with
splitting verbs simplifies the whole topic and describes the confusion.

I hope that analysis helped. :)
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Re: The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2018, 23:03
Hi egmat,

Could you please help with this problem.

Posted from my mobile device
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Re: The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2018, 23:55
1
generis wrote:
dave13 wrote:
Curly05 wrote:
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.


A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable

B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable

C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable

D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully

E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable

hello generis, :) how do we call a grammatical construction or style :? in option B ? i prefered A over B :) cause i thought B was akward and wordy. :?

Hi dave13 ,

Well, I kinda understand about the "awkward and wordy" part.
On the other hand, if you weren't sure about "hopefully" —and many people aren't—pick THAT one.
If a test taker is not sure whether a word in one answer is correct, and the other answer
sounds wordy and awkward? Choose the "wordy" and "awkward" one. "Wordy and awkward" aren't good. But they aren't wrong. ;)

You have asked a really hard question.
Style and rhetoric questions delve into difficult material. I have no doubt you can handle it.

What you see is called "splitting the verb."

The auxiliary verb "will" is split from the main verb by the adverb "it is hoped," probably for two reasons:

1) to qualify, explicitly, an extraordinary assertion (think about seeing the formation of black holes!); and

2) to maintain flow. Stylistically, the phrase does not work very well elsewhere.

This construction looks very strange to many.
If you read enough stuffy or scientific literature, the phrase does not seem strange. (Guilty as charged.)

Such splitting is allowed, and often done to add particular emphasis or to avoid strange phrasing.

• The sentence could be rewritten this way:

(1) It is hoped that the use of gravity waves, which do not present the problems that X do, will enable astronomers to study Y and Z.

The author wants to emphasize the importance of gravity waves' potential to make it possible for human beings
to witness the formation of black holes and neutron stars (Y and Z).
(S)he partly accomplishes her goal by keeping what astronomers will be able to study at the end of the sentence.
(In English, readers naturally stress the end of a sentence most of the time.)

The phrase's placement in (1), however, puts too much stress on "it is hoped."
The sentence leads with a hypothetical, and one without an agent at that.

• So let's try a different placement of the adverbial phrase "it is hoped."

(2) The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, will enable, it is hoped, astronomers to study Y and Z. :(

Adverbs should not intrude between verb (enable) and object (astronomers).
Now the adverb is clumsy and a buttinsky.

This writer wants to talk about radical horizons.
The connection between "enable" and astronomers" is blocked. Adverb between verb and object is ungrammatical.

• Let's move the phrase again.

(3) The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, it is hoped will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars. :(

The author wants to focus on the potential for astronomers to study X and Y.
(S)he has to qualify the assertion, but in this sentence the phrase disconnects the logical connection between waves . . . will enable.

If we put it is hoped after the comma and before the auxiliary verb phrase, that placement suggests an antecedent of "it."
No such antecedent exists. "It" is a dummy placeholder.
The phrase draws unearned attention in this third case.

• We have a better choice of placement. The author qualifies an exciting assertion in the correct manner
by signaling the uncertainty without harping on it.


The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.

In rhetorical and syntactic effect, the reader discovers an exciting prospect.

This prospect (future, declarative) WILL, it is hoped, ENABLE.
Those two words draw the attention.

"It is hoped," placed between a declared future and a Good Thing, allows us to absorb measured determination.

Black holes and neutron stars fascinate me.

Even with many commas in its sentence, the placement of "will, it is hoped, enable"
mimics a human being who waits with bated breath.
------------
And if none of that explanation satisfies you, rely on POE. :-D

Split #1: LIKE is incorrect
The cue is "in the way." That very phrase is a good way to test whether we should use the word "as" instead of "like."
We need AS _____s DO.

Omit C and D

Split #2: SUCH AS is for examples
SUCH AS . . . ______s DO is incorrect

Omit E

Split #3 - Hopefully is an adverb. What, the gravity waves will be hopeful when they enable astronomers to witness the formation of black holes? I don't think so.
Correct: I hope, they hope, scientists hope
Correct: it is hoped
Incorrect: hopefully (in this case)

Omit A.

One note of caution: splitting verbs with adverbs can produce confusion. This excellent synopsis that deals with
splitting verbs simplifies the whole topic and describes the confusion.

I hope that analysis helped. :)



generis thank you SO much for a brilliant explanation. :thumbup: All is clear now :)
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Re: The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2018, 07:00
Curly05 wrote:
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.


A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable

B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable

C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable

D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully

E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable



I always don't understand this point of grammar. Gravity waves do not interact with matter like electromagnetic waves. Clarify on what this means, I think it means it does not interact with matter that is like electromagnetic waves.

Gravity waves do not interact with matter like electromagnetic waves do interact with matter.

Do you cut out the "interact with matter" part to make it more readable. Is that what people do who speak English?

You have to understand stuffed bears are foreigners like someone from Russia or India. :lol: :lol:


daagh

in option (B) isn't 'it is hoped' redundant?
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The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2018, 07:44
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Parth

Redundant means something already used and repeated needlessly. Where has 'it is hoped' been used already in B or for that matter any other choice?

On the contrary, the issue with 'hopefully' is more problematic. Can we precisely say who is acting hopefully? It cannot be said that the use of gravity waves or the waves are acting hopefully. The 'it' in 'it is hoped' is a filler. Therefore, that use is passable.
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