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Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form

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Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 28 Sep 2018, 01:28
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A
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D
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Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
(B) remaining like that even as
(C) remaining as such whether or not
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 220: Sentence Correction


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Source: OG verbal review 2: Q45.

Spoiler: :: nytimes article
https://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/22/science/with-a-mighty-squeeze-nitrogen-is-transformed.html

The transformation is similar to that of carbon. Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into diamond and remains diamond even when the heat and pressure are taken away.

Originally posted by az780 on 07 Feb 2008, 05:29.
Last edited by Bunuel on 28 Sep 2018, 01:28, edited 5 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: QOTD: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2018, 01:15
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Quote:
(A) remaining this way whether or not

For starters, the parallelism doesn’t make any sense. The parallelism trigger “and” is followed by “remaining”, and there’s no “-ing” modifier that could possibly be parallel to “remaining.”

Also, “whether or not” is apparently considered redundant on the GMAT. “Whether” is enough, and the “or not” is just a waste of words.

For whatever it’s worth, I’m also not crazy about the phrase “in this way.” But I’ll say more about that at the end of the explanation.

In any case, the parallelism alone is enough to eliminate (A).

Quote:
(B) remaining like that even as

(B) has the same parallelism problem as (A). See above for more on that issue.

Plus, the phrase “like that” is a little bit suspect here. I think “that” is trying to act as a singular pronoun (more on “that” in this article and in this video), and it presumably refers to “diamond.” So we have: “graphite… (remains) like a diamond even as the heat and pressure are removed.” Nope, the graphite IS a diamond – it’s not “like a diamond” or “like diamond.”

So (B) is gone.

Quote:
(C) remaining as such whether or not

(C) has the same two problems as (A): the parallelism is wrong, and “whether or not” isn’t really the GMAT’s favorite phrase. See the explanation for (A) for more on these issues.

I’m not sure that the phrase “as such” is completely wrong, for whatever it’s worth. I think it’s awkward and clunky and a little bit antiquated, but I wouldn’t eliminate (C) based solely on that phrase. Fortunately, we have plenty of completely concrete reasons to get rid of (C).

And now things get nasty.

Quote:
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when

The parallelism is fine now! We have “graphite… changes into… diamond and remains…” That’s cool.

So what’s the difference between (D) and (E)? There are only two things, and both are pretty subtle.

First, “in this way” in (D) is pretty goofy. I guess the phrase “this way” is trying to refer to the fact that the substance is now a diamond? I can’t be certain that it’s WRONG, but it’s awfully weird to say “graphite remains in this way” when we’re trying to say “graphite remains a diamond.” How is being a diamond “a way”? That doesn’t make much sense. In (E), “thus” sounds pretentious, but it can reasonably refer back to “as a diamond.”

The other problem is a little bit clearer. The underlined portion in (D) ends with “although”, which basically means “despite the fact that” – so (D) is saying that the substance remains a diamond “despite the fact that the heat and pressure are removed.” (E) says that the substance remains a diamond “even when the heat and pressure are removed.”

That might seem like a really tiny difference, but (E) makes more sense. The point is that the substance remains a diamond even after the heat and pressure are removed – after all, you wouldn’t wear a hot, pressurized diamond in a ring, right? There’s no reason to emphasize the idea that it remains a diamond despite being removed from the heat.

So it’s probably a little bit unsatisfying, but (E) is our answer.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2010, 17:37
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Ron Purewal says (and I post this here for the benefit of the group..I will take the KUDOS anyways :P ):
the correct answer to this problem is (e).

usually "thus" is used to mean roughly "therefore", BUT "thus" can mean "in the same way" or "in the same state".
for instance:
at maturity the caterpillar becomes a butterfly, and remains thus until its death. --> in this case, "thus" means "in the same state", and, therefore, means "as a butterfly".

same thing in choice (e), in which "thus" means "in the form of diamond".

this IS the intended meaning: AT THE TIME WHEN the pressure is removed, the substance stays in the form of diamond.

--

(d) is incorrect.

* "in this way" is unidiomatic here.
"in this way" can refer only to the MANNER IN WHICH AN EVENT OR ACTION OCCURS OR IS PERFORMED.
it CANNOT refer to the physical state of something. for instance, in the above example, you CANNOT use "in this way" to refer to the butterfly stage.

also:
* if you use "although", you are basically declaring that "the heat and pressure are removed".
in other words, "X, although Y" expresses the idea that X and Y are both facts (although they contrast with each other in some way).
this is not the intended meaning; "heat and pressure are removed" is a hypothetical that may or may not happen, and so should be introduced with "when" or "if" rather than "although".

-End of Ron's message

Thank you.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2008, 06:02
3
Parallel Structure

Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
Not parallel to changes into
(B) remaining like that even as
Same as a
(C) remaining as such whether or not
Same as a
(D) remains in this way although
Hold it
(E) remains thus even when
akward

D for me.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2008, 08:07
2
az780 wrote:
Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
(B) remaining like that even as
(C) remaining as such whether or not
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when


A, B, C are out because of "remaining"
D is out because of "in this way"

E is correct.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2008, 09:37
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E for me.

"remains thus" does imply the continuation of status quo or in this case the existential form (diamond).

"although" & "are" together didn't sound right to me. Maybe, it's a tense issue...

someone enlighten me please...
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2008, 12:31
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yeah, i will say e. you want to show that even after the conditions (heat, pressure) are removed, diamond stays the way it is. Therefore, you need 'even when...' sort of construction.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Feb 2008, 00:29
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The sentence has “whether” usage issue -

(A) remaining this way whether or not (Whether implies an alternative or not – eliminate it)

(B) remaining like that even as (“like” is used to compare two same comparable entities (nouns) – eliminate it)

(C) remaining as such whether or not (Whether or not – eliminate it)

(D) remains in this way although (Hold it)

(E) remains thus even when (“When” is time modifier – eliminate it)

Answer: D
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2009, 13:58
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I did not find although very appealing and thus as well

I ended up picking E. Any thoughts on these?
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2009, 14:01
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az780 wrote:
Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
(B) remaining like that even as
(C) remaining as such whether or not
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when


Hi mates,

IMO E

Because of //ism, A, B and C out: graphite changes [...] and remains [...]

Between D and E... well, for me Diamon is a state not a way, so, E

OA and Source?

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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2009, 17:21
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D
The "thus" in E is too awkward.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2009, 17:37
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az780 wrote:
Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
(B) remaining like that even as
(C) remaining as such whether or not
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when

parallelism dictates that it should be remains parallel to changes.
D would have been my choice if it would just say remains this way and not remains in this way.
So I go for E.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2009, 01:39
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I will chose E instead of D...I think "in this way" is not making sense in D...On the contrary "remains thus" usage can be found in a lot of writings...
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2009, 03:33
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E it is:

Dictionary meaning in WordWeb
thus (adverb) means: In the way indicated

although is inappropriate in D.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2009, 10:07
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nik1608nik wrote:
There you have the full question.

Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not-out
(B) remaining like that even as-out
(C) remaining as such whether or not-out
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when

can say which is is wrong exactly either D or E.Plz help.


E IMO. As for difference between D and E
e.g.
The substance remains warm although ice is added.
The substance remains warm even when ice is added.
In the second sentence the emphasize is on the fact that even if you add ice, the substance remains its quality. This moment is not emphasized so strongly in the first sentence, just like in D and E
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2009, 07:36
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IMO E.

Original meaning "whether or not" heat and pressure are removed. This is bidirectional, heat and pressure can be removed or not removed.

Choice D is using "although" means heat and pressure are certained to be removed, thus changing the meaning.

Choice E is using "even when" also a bidirectional.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2010, 10:07
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az780 wrote:
Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
(B) remaining like that even as
(C) remaining as such whether or not
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when


A, B and C should be eliminated due to lack of parallelism.
'although the heat and pressure are removed' suggests an action being performed when in fact we're only making a statement of a potential occurence. Therefore D is out.
The use of 'thus' is awkward but gramatically correct as it suggest that the subject remains in its state. The use of 'when' properly completes the statement by conveying a potential occurence - that the subject retains its state even when heat and pressure are removed. I'd go with E.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2013, 14:44
Hi I have read the OA is E, can somebody explain what is the exact meaning of "thus" and when it can be used ?
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2013, 14:59
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Darmody wrote:
Hi I have read the OA is E, can somebody explain what is the exact meaning of "thus" and when it can be used ?


Hi Darmody,

Your question is very much justified; this usage of "thus" is rare. Usually it is used to mark a conclusion, but in this sentence it is used to express the present state of something; "in this way".

"Thus" is used in this sentence to expresses the present state of the transformed graphite, i.e. diamond.

To put it in simpler word you can replace "thus" with "in this way"

So the choice can be reworded as - remains in this way even

You may use "thus" as a replacement of "in this way" or "the same way"

As an example:

Mary is extremely sad and is expected to remain thus until she hears some good news. --> You may replace "thus" with "in this way" and the meaning would remain the same.

Vercules
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2013, 11:21
vercules,
Can you please explain why the use of although is wrong in this sentence...
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form   [#permalink] 11 Mar 2013, 11:21

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