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Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form

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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2013, 13:04
3
skamal7 wrote:
vercules,
Can you please explain why the use of although is wrong in this sentence...


Hi skamal7,

Putting into simple words, you use "although" when you are stating facts that happened or happening. "even when" is usually used when you want to express a hypothetical condition or a habit.

I go to school although it is raining.-->

Incorrect, "I go to school" expresses a habit, where as "although" is expressing a fact, i.e. "it is raining". The question under discussion presents the quality of graphite/ diamond. This is a general truth and in its use of although in (D) the sentence incorrectly means that this one time "heat and pressure are removed" and diamond remains in its current state. However, this does not expresses a general quality properly. The sentence's actual meaning is that diamond will retain its state while and even after removing heat and pressure. The removal of heat and pressure has not happened, it may or may not happen thus it is hypothetical. The use of "even if" would also be correct in this case.

I am going to school, although it is raining. -->

Correct, two facts are being expressed "going to school" and "it is raining".

I go to school even when it is raining. -->

Better, the sentence means that "I will go to school whether it rains or not" is it raining right not? may be or may not be (hypothetical).

I go to school even when it rains. -->

Best, now the sentence expresses a habit, using simple present verbs "go" and "rains".

Hope this helps,

Vercules
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2014, 07:03
Hi E-Gmat,

Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not-out
(B) remaining like that even as-out
(C) remaining as such whether or not-out
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when


Im able to eliminate Choices A,B,&C as and is the parallel marker First Verb is "Changes" and Second should be "Remains"
But not able to eliminate Choice D & E. Please explain ?

Thanks in advance
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2014, 11:37
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Hi Nitin,

As the above poster has pointed out "although" is unnecessarily bringing in a contrast. There is no contrast in the intended meaning of the sentence. The sentence wants to say that even when certain conditions are changed, the diamond doesn't change. So, no contrast is required here.

I hope this helps!

Regards,
Meghna
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2015, 20:30
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Two reasons for option E over D :

- D introduces unnecessary contrast by using Although. (Although changes the intended meaning of the sentence)

- In D (X, although Y) - the subject of X & Y are not related.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2015, 09:06
AryamaDuttaSaikia wrote:
- In D (X, although Y) - the subject of X & Y are not related.

Can you explain this further. It is not clear to me.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2015, 22:14
X, Although Y

- Although introduces "Contrast".

Typical structure of "although" - depedent clause marker - Although X,Y

2 things:

1. X & Y needs to be parallel

2. The subject of X and the subject of Y needs to be related. (Since we are starting a sentence in X with "although" , we need to complete the sentence by referring to a related subject in Y)

Hope it helps!
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2017, 10:58
I am not sure why E is correct?Can somebody explain this?
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2017, 04:47
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Gomze wrote:
I am not sure why E is correct?Can somebody explain this?


Options A, B and C can be eliminated on the same ground:
The use of conjunction "and" calls for another verb (to be parallel with "changes"): "changes and remains" is the correct parallel structure. Therefore options A, B and C can be eliminated because they use present participle "remaining", which cannot be parallel to the verb "changes".

Between options D and E, E is better due to concision (using one word "thus" instead of three "in this way" to indicate the same meaning).
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2017, 07:49
Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

Issues: Parallelism | Meaning

Analysis:
1. In this sentence, we need to make sure that we maintain parallelism between verbs i.e. between "changes" and "remains" ("remaining" in original sentence)

(A) remaining this way whether or not
- not parallel

(B) remaining like that even as
- not parallel

(C) remaining as such whether or not
- not parallel

(D) remains in this way although
- "in this way" is ambiguous
- "although" is used for demonstrating contract and distorts the meaning here

(E) remains thus even when

Answer: (E)
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2017, 23:18
Hi Can anyone explain why D is wrong and E is correct
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 05:08
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Logically speaking, 'this way' can be said only in face-to-face conversations colloquially when you can show someone something pointing with your index or fore- finger.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2017, 02:25
az780 wrote:
Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
(B) remaining like that even as
(C) remaining as such whether or not
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when

Source: OG verbal review 2: Q45.


Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

PRESENCE OF "and" and that too just before the underlined part (is a gift from the Lords of GMAT :cool: ) -- shows a MARKER for parallelism.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
Parallelism issue + whether or not is redundant. INCORRECT.

(B) remaining like that even as (USAGE OF EVEN AFTER WOULD HAVE BEEN CORRECT)
Parallelism issue. INCORRECT.

(C) remaining as such whether or not
Parallelism issue + whether or not is redundant. INCORRECT.

(D) remains in this way although
usage of ALTHOUGH is wrong here! Although is used to show a contrast but here a contrast is not intended. Therefore, incorrect.

(E) remains thus even when
Here, the usage of remains in this way and remains thus is almost equivalent. CORRECT.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2017, 06:39
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"changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way"

The one takeaway from this question is that whenever one sees the construction " and +verbing", it should flash a red signal that that it is a precursor to a potential parallelism error. Immediately look for a similar participle construction on the left of 'and', very often it has been seen that there is a verbed clause rather than a present participle. We can remove a good chunk of faulty choices, as the at least three choices that we can dump in one stone in this given case.
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Re: QOTD: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2018, 00:18
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In D, "although" is not correct as suggested above. I am not sure "this way" is acceptable as it is vague usage.
In E, "thus" can be replaced with "so" and vice versa.

I had a car, thus, I drove.
I had a car, so I drove. (No change in meaning)

Thus, (So,) E is much better choice than D.
Please correct me if wrong.
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Re: Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2018, 09:19
[quote="az780"]Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form of pure carbon, changes into the substance commonly referred to as diamond and remaining this way whether or not the heat and pressure are removed.

(A) remaining this way whether or not
(B) remaining like that even as
(C) remaining as such whether or not
(D) remains in this way although
(E) remains thus even when


look at choice D and E.

the intended meaning is graphite exist in this state. the intended meaning is not graphite exist in this way. what way is "this way"? it is unclear about "this way". the meaning that "graphit exist in this state " is clear and logic.
there is not any "way" in the previous phrase for us to say " in this way" in the ending phrase.

although say about a contrast. the fact after although must exist before the fact in the main clause. this is not applicable in here.
although he study well before, he fail on the test

here the becoming diamond dose not exist before remain, so, although here is wrong
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Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2018, 21:13
nitishkr wrote:
In D, "although" is not correct as suggested above. I am not sure "this way" is acceptable as it is vague usage.
In E, "thus" can be replaced with "so" and vice versa.

I had a car, thus, I drove.
I had a car, so I drove. (No change in meaning)

Thus, (So,) E is much better choice than D.
Please correct me if wrong.



Hi nitishkr

In this particular question, the word "thus" in choice E does not perform the role of "therefore/so". It actually is another way to say "in this way/as described before". Please check out the second meaning in the list at this link https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dicti ... glish/thus to understand the usage of "thus" in this fashion. :)

Also, your example sentence (referred to below) is not correct as "thus" cannot join two independent clauses - I know you wanted to equate the meaning of "thus" with "so", but the two are not interchangeable, grammatically speaking. You need a FANBOY conjunction to do so:

I had a car, thus, I drove.

IC1 = I had a car.
IC2 = I drove.

Hope the above explanation and reference help!

Cheers!

NS
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Under high pressure and intense heat, graphite, the most stable form &nbs [#permalink] 05 Nov 2018, 21:13

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