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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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kntombat wrote:
Got 5/6 correct in 10 mins 29 secs. Sajjad1994, could you provide the OE for question 6, I would love to know where I went wrong.



Hi, I can share my reasoning.

See line 35 onwards.

But the difficulty of the sources, while it might appear to explain why the relevant scholarship has not been undertaken, seems actually to have deterred few: the fact is that few (40) historians have wanted to write anything approaching women’s legal history in the first place.

The author mentions that it might seem that nobody did a study on the legal history of women because of the difficulty of the sources. But author then goes on to mention that even though people might say so, in reality, this difficulty of sources never really deterred anyone. The fact was that only few historians wanted to write about these women's legal history. That is, they were least interested. That's option A.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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Saasingh wrote:
All correct. Total time 14:11.

Waiting for difficulty level update


Hi Saasingh

I have updated the overall difficulty level of the passage, It is 650. Below is the individual difficulty level of each question.

Question #1: 600
Question #2: 700
Question #3: 600
Question #4: 650
Question #5: 700
Question #6: 650

Overall: 650

Remember we are working on the auto-update difficulty level of RC questions behind the scenes, Above stats are just a rough idea.

Good Luck!
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
The official answer should be "the relative scarcity of studies providing a comprehensive overview of women’s legal history" For Question number 6.
As it is clearly mention at the starting of the passage that "serious deficiency" is Scarcity in studies.

Please explain why the answer is E
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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VBudhew wrote:
The official answer should be "the relative scarcity of studies providing a comprehensive overview of women’s legal history" For Question number 6.
As it is clearly mention at the starting of the passage that "serious deficiency" is Scarcity in studies.

Please explain why the answer is E


Answer of question number 6 is A not E. Please clarify if you are looking for something other.

Thanks
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
on what basis we should eliminate option E FOR Q6 ? it seems equally compelling like option A
can anyone help?

thanks .
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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kadamhari825 wrote:
on what basis we should eliminate option E FOR Q6 ? it seems equally compelling like option A
can anyone help?

thanks .


Read the lines 39-41 clearly state the author’s explanation—lack of interest on the part of historians. The sentence that follows clears up which historians the author means here: modern legal historians, most of which don’t give a hoot about how laws affect women. And the sentence in lines 46-48 clinches it:

“Very few legal historians have started with an interest in women’s history . . .” Put it all together and we’ve got choice (A).

Answer Choice (E) gets things backwards. It is the lack of books and articles on this particular topic that makes it difficult, according to the author, to produce such comprehensive studies.

Thank you
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
Sajjad1994

Could you elaborate answers for the Q2 and Q5.
I have chosen two times "E".

Thanks beforehand.
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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Mike20201 wrote:
Sajjad1994

Could you elaborate answers for the Q2 and Q5.
I have chosen two times "E".

Thanks beforehand.


Explanation


2. Which one of the following best describes the organization of the first paragraph of the passage?

Difficulty Level: Hard

Explanation

We’re asked how the first paragraph is put together. Perhaps a scan of the beginning of each choice saved you a little time here—the complaint that underlies the entire passage is that of a lack, a dearth, a “deficiency” as it’s put in line 7 and in correct choice (D). The deficiency is first described as the dearth of books and articles on the author’s chosen subject. The nature of the deficiency is then discussed—that’s all that specific stuff regarding the unanswered questions brought up in lines 16-25. Do we then get a remedy that represents the “sole possible means” of correcting the problem? Yup: Doing quantitative case studies is the “only” way to even begin to answer these questions. A perfect paraphrase, completing a perfect choice.

(A) At best, the first sentence implies that the deficient sources are necessary to the study of this topic, but it goes too far to say that the necessary preparations are actively “discussed.” Even if we let this slide, there certainly are no excuses made for why such “preparations” weren’t begun earlier.

(B) “A problem is described. . .”—fair enough. Uh-oh, it’s downhill fast after that. “. . . a taxonomy of . . . questions relevant to its solution is proposed”? No—examples of questions that are unanswerable due to the problem are presented. There’s no discussion here about what kind of questions might help solve the problem. The author states flat-out that only one remedy is possible, and even that’s not guaranteed to clear up the whole picture.

(C) is way too vague. What “discipline” are we talking about here? Legal scholarship in general? And where’s the prediction? The final sentence is an assertion, not a prediction. (C) just doesn’t match up.

(E) begins a little better than (A); at least here we can say that “resources” refers to court records whereas it’s hard to tell in (A) what “preparations” refers to. But the “list of questions” that follow is meant to demonstrate the kinds of things that can’t be determined without those resources, not highlight the inherent limitations of the resources themselves. The problem is not the court records, but the fact that no one’s consulting them on this matter.

Answer: D


5. As used in lines 37–38, the phrase “the relevant scholarship” can best be understood as referring to which one of the following kinds of scholarly work?

Difficulty Level: Hard

Explanation

When we pursue the line reference, we see that “the relevant scholarship” is followed by “has not been undertaken . . .” That can only mean one thing: The author’s talking here about the kind of scholarship that few have undertaken, the dearth of which forms the basis of his lament—quantitative studies of court records documenting the real effects of medieval English law on women, choice (C).

(A) and (B) deal with the kind of factors that the author proposes, and then dismisses, as reasons why “the relevant scholarship” has not been undertaken. The kinds of scholarly pursuits mentioned in these choices cannot therefore represent the relevant scholarship itself, which again is the scrupulous examination of actual court records to determine the real deal for medieval women.

(D) harks back to the sources in line 12, but we’ve seen time and again how these statutes, treatises and commentaries do not provide the insights the author craves. In light of the author’s concerns, the work described in (D) would be IR relevant scholarship.

(E) What “existing scholarly literature?” According to the first sentence, one would be hard pressed to find such scholarship, due to a “dearth of published books or articles” on the subject. The whole problem, according to the author, is that there aren’t enough sources to write such a comprehensive history on the topic. The “relevant scholarship” can’t refer to reviews of a bounty of material that (according to the author) doesn’t exist.

Answer: C


Explanation Credit: Kaplan LSAT
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
Can someone explain Q3 and Q4..
Thanks
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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sidharth2412 wrote:
Can someone explain Q3 and Q4..
Thanks


Explanation


3. According to the passage, quantitative studies of the kind referred to in line 25 can aid in determining

Difficulty Level: 550

Explanation

What would the quantitative studies of all those court cases be good for? Well, for exactly what the author wants—insight into the real legal experience of medieval English women. When the author says in lines 25-28 that these studies are the only hope to answer “these questions,” the questions he’s referring to are the ones listed above that deal with, as (D) aptly puts it, “how medieval women’s lives were really affected by medieval laws.”

(A), (B) The sources listed in line 12 are the ones that are able to shed light on the intentions of medieval laws. Nowhere are we told that the court records can do this too. And (B)’s “unconscious or hidden motives” is even one step removed from “stated intentions,” and once again we have no way of knowing that the court records will be of any use exposing those.

(C) The author believes that studying the court records from medieval cases can provide insight into the real legal experience of medieval women. What these records could possibly reveal about modern legal institutions is anyone’s guess, and certainly isn’t something that’s stated in the passage.

(E) Categorizing the legal documents relating to medieval women isn’t the issue here—no one seems concerned about that. The author wants to know what’s in these records, not how to categorize them.

Answer: D


4. According to the passage, the sources consulted by legal scholars of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries provided adequate information concerning which one of the following topics?

Difficulty Level: 650

Explanation

Q. 4 represents the flip side of Q. 1. In that one, we were asked to recognize that the sources listed in line 12, much to the consternation of our author, provide little insight on the actual legal experience of medieval English women. However, as we’ve seen, these sources can shed light on what the author refers to as the “latter questions”—namely “how the law was intended to affect them or thought to affect them” (lines 9-10). These topics appear in choice (A): “intent and opinion of commentators” is right on the money.

(B) The sentence beginning “And quite apart from provisions . . .” in lines 19-21 suggests that these sources may indicate aspects of the law that applied to women only, but nowhere is it stated or implied that these treatises, statutes, and commentaries speak to the “overall effectiveness” of English law.

(C) It seems we would need to consult the court records to obtain this kind of specific information. Insights on intent and legal commentaries wouldn’t reveal women’s actual probability of success.

(D) seems to be a takeoff on the question of how women’s privileges may have been thwarted by intimidation or harassment (lines 16-18), but there are two immediate problems with this: First, this is the type of question that the sources in line 12 cannot answer. And second, we’re not told who may be thwarting their rights, so “male relatives” is too specific here. If you axed this choice right off the bat by simply considering male relatives outside the scope, good for you.

(E) Again, this is something that’s too specific to glean from the sources in line 12. Nothing that goes beyond intentions and interpretations can fit the bill here.

Answer: A
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Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
Can someone explain Q1?­ ­I can't find anything related to the "writers of women's legal history". 
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
can someone explain Q6 please.

thanks beforehand
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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janitious wrote:
Can someone explain Q1?­ ­I can't find anything related to the "writers of women's legal history". 

Explanation
­

1. It can be inferred from the passage that the author believes which one of the following to be true of the sources consulted by nineteenth-century historians of medieval law?

Explanation

First up is an Inference question concerning the sources listed in line 12; hopefully you didn’t have any trouble tracking the reference down. These are the things (treatises, commentaries and statutes) that the author laments give no solid information on the real legal experience of medieval English women. They do come in handy, however in answering “the latter two questions,” which refers to the issues in lines 9-10: how the law was intended to affect women or thought to affect them. Any of this will suffice. (D) focuses on the author’s lament as repeated throughout the passage.

(A) The author would not agree with (A), believing as he does that these sources do not illuminate what should be considered a major part of medieval law, namely, the realworld influence it had on women’s lives.

(B) If anything, the author would prefer the medieval sources, because at least contained therein one could find information on just how the law at that time affected women. On that count, the sources listed in line 12 are of no help.

(C) The relevance of these sources to modern legal institutions and ideas is outside the scope. The author bemoans one fundamental lack on the part of these treatises, commentaries, and statutes—and this isn’t it.

(E) If there are writers interested specifically in women’s legal history—and the author seems skeptical of that—they won’t find answers in these sources to the questions that the author thinks they should find interesting. The first three words should have tipped you off: The whole point is that the author doesn’t find these sources valuable for serious inquiries into women’s legal history.

Answer: D
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Re: Until about 1970, anyone who wanted to write a comprehensive history [#permalink]
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kalpita63 wrote:
can someone explain Q6 please.

thanks beforehand

­
Explanation


­
6. It can be inferred from the passage that, in the author’s view, which one of the following factors is most responsible for the current deficiencies in our knowledge of women’s legal history?

Explanation

This is an Inference question, and again the topic doesn’t stray far at all from the main issue at hand, namely the deficiency that so irks our author. Lines 39-41 clearly state the author’s explanation—lack of interest on the part of historians. The sentence that follows clears up which historians the author means here: modern legal historians, most of which don’t give a hoot about how laws affect women. And the sentence in lines 46-48 clinches it: “Very few legal historians have started with an interest in women’s history . . .” Put it all together and we’ve got choice (A).

(B) refers to the difficulties the author introduces, but dismisses, as possible reasons for the deficiency in question.

(C) says that the historians are looking in the wrong place, concentrating on the type of sources listed in line 12. This is tricky, because in Para 1 the author does state that 19th and 20th century scholars did concentrate on treatises and commentaries when writing about medieval law. But it’s not as if modern scholars wanted to understand how the law affected medieval women and they simply got bogged down in the wrong sources. That makes the deficiency sound more accidental than it is, when the reason is more straightforward—they simply lacked the interest.

(D) No such definition of women’s legal history is given. This, therefore, cannot be an obstacle to the type of scholarship the author favors.

(E) gets things backwards. It is the lack of books and articles on this particular topic that makes it difficult, according to the author, to produce such comprehensive studies.

Answer: A­
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