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Use of "In Which" and "Whereby"

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Use of "In Which" and "Whereby" [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2008, 16:07
Can you guys help explain when to use "in which" and "whereby" on gmat sentence correction...i'm stumped.
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Re: Use of "In Which" and "Whereby" [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2008, 18:21
Can you give us an example?

I don't believe the two ('in which' and 'whereby') function the same. It seems 'in which' is going to refer to a noun that does an action. Here is what Wiktionary.com had to say about "whereby":

Wiktionary Comment on 'whereby' wrote:
Use of whereby as a formal equivalent of where is nonstandard and is avoided by careful speakers and writers, who use where or in which instead. The term typically fails readability and comprehension review so it is generally avoided in published works. The term is also avoided by speakers as it makes it difficult to understand the message that's trying to be communicated.


If I see the term "whereby" in a SC question, I'm probably going to look for the sentence that doesn't use "whereby".

I've come up with a few examples of the proper usage of "in which":

1) The car, in which Jason rode, was a restored 1965 Mustang convertible.
2) Yesterday's game, in which she scored 3 goals, was her best game of the season.

These are not great examples. Each can be rewritten to be clearer such as:

1) Jason rode in a restored 1965 Mustang convertible.
2) She scored 3 goals in yesterday's game, her best game of the season. (I'm not sure I like this version better than my first attempt).

I hope this gives you some help. Generally, we want sentences and spoken English to be clear and understandable. When someone begins to use words and phrases such as "whereby" and "in which" I laugh to myself. Most of the time, the person is trying to sound intelligent. Few people actually have these words in the daily vocabulary.

jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
Can you guys help explain when to use "in which" and "whereby" on gmat sentence correction...i'm stumped.

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Re: Use of "In Which" and "Whereby" [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2008, 18:27
jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
Can you guys help explain when to use "in which" and "whereby" on gmat sentence correction...i'm stumped.


"whereby" ="by which", so I think "whereby" is different from "in which"

"in which" = where, but do not say "by which" = "by where" :lol:
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Re: Use of "In Which" and "Whereby" [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2008, 19:03
Would Whereby & In Which be consider redundant?
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Re: Use of "In Which" and "Whereby" [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2008, 05:05
I would not consider Whereby & In Which redundant. Each has a use and when used properly they do add to the sentence. The problem is, the usage of these words creates a rather complex sentence. While we spend so long on our writing learning how to get beyond "The cat jumped over the hat" and to "The red cat, infested with fleas, jumped over the large brown hat.", sometimes the most effective writing is very simple and focused.

Also, using "in which" will often create a passive sentence if we do not carefully construct the sentence.

PASSIVE VOICE
The car, in which Michael rode, was going 20 mph over the speed limit.

ACTIVE VOICE
The car, in which Michael rode, raced down the road at 20 mph over the speed limit.

The sentence kind of sounds odd to have an inanimate object such as a car doing some action.

jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
Would Whereby & In Which be consider redundant?

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Re: Use of "In Which" and "Whereby" [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2018, 06:15
jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
Would Whereby & In Which be consider redundant?


No they are not redundant

As per MGMAT SC guide in which modifies metaphorical place such as , condition, situation, case, circumstance or arrangement. In which can also be used to refer time i,e, in place of modifier WHEN

So GMAT typically uses in which / when split or in which / where split.



Q70/OG 12 His studies of ice-polished rocks....concept of an age in which / when great ice sheets had existed in now currently temperate areas

Q 92/OG 12 The energy source on Voyager 2....reactor, in which atoms.....

Q104/OG 12 El nino, the periodic ..... , a phenomenon in which changes....

Q74 / OG12 Despite its covering the entire planet,......
OE - A dangling modifier is an error in sentence structure whereby a participle is associated with a word other than the one intended or with no particular word at all.

whereby = by means of which

GMAT prep Q In Alexandria, the Ptolemys founded a library in which / therby the written remains of Greek literature could be gathered together and systematized
OA - in which
OE clealy states use of wherby indicates that library is a means of gathering....

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Re: Use of "In Which" and "Whereby" [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2018, 11:40
jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
Can you guys help explain when to use "in which" and "whereby" on gmat sentence correction...i'm stumped.


"In which" is a weird one, because we don't use it very often when we write or speak. But there's nothing wrong with it.

There are actually a lot of similar phrases that mean similar things: "on which", "near which", "with which", "without which", etc. All of these phrases are used to begin a modifier, just like the word "which" by itself.

Correct sentences:

The waiting room, in which patients sometimes must spend upwards of two hours, is barren and lifeless.

I carefully walked around the table, on which sat a priceless antique vase.

Joe is very attached to his bicycle, without which he would lose his delivery job.

Here's what these phrases are for. Normally, when you just use 'which', you're saying that the noun being modified is the direct object of the action in the modifier. For instance, in the sentence "I threw the ball," 'ball' is the direct object of the action 'threw'. So when you turn that into a modifier instead, you'd have a sentence like this:

The ball, which I threw, disappeared over the wall.

In the sentence "Joe owns a bicycle," 'bicycle' is the direct object of 'owns'. Likewise, you'd just use "which":

The bicycle, which Joe owns, is red.

But sometimes, the thing you want to modify isn't the direct object. In the sentence "the vase sits on the table," 'table' is NOT the object of 'sits'. You can tell because 'table' is part of a prepositional phrase: 'on the table'.

Similarly, in 'He would lose his delivery job without his bicycle', 'bicycle' is NOT the object of 'lose'. In fact, 'delivery job' is the object of 'lose'.

So when you turn sentences like these into modifiers, you'd use phrases like 'on which' or 'without which':

I carefully walked around the table, on which sat a priceless antique vase.

Joe is very attached to his bicycle, without which he would lose his delivery job.
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Re: Use of "In Which" and "Whereby"   [#permalink] 21 Jan 2018, 11:40
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