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V02-10

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V02-10  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:56
1
7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

56% (00:53) correct 44% (00:44) wrong based on 95 sessions

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This process resulted in a total of fifteen new townships; of which, to date, seven are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, seven are still in existence.
B. of which number, seven of the fifteen are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number fifteen, seven, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these fifteen, seven are still in existence.
E. to date, seven of the fifteen are still in existence.

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:56
Official Solution:

This process resulted in a total of fifteen new townships; of which, to date, seven are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, seven are still in existence.
B. of which number, seven of the fifteen are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number fifteen, seven, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these fifteen, seven are still in existence.
E. to date, seven of the fifteen are still in existence.

This question requires phrasing that will clearly relate the numbers seven and fifteen to each other, and correctly place the temporal marker to date.
  1. The words of which at the beginning of the clause do not clearly refer to any antecedent.
  2. The words of which at the beginning of the clause do not clearly refer to any antecedent, and the parenthetical expression to date is awkward and unnecessary.
  3. The word number in the first part of the clause is redundant, and the string of parenthetical expressions – 7, to date – makes the clause awkward and unclear.
  4. The phrase to date is misplaced and seems to refer to these 15 rather than any appropriate temporal marker.
  5. The phrase to date is correctly set off by itself, the phrase 7 of the 15 clearly positions the two numbers relative to each other.

Answer: E
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New post 22 Oct 2014, 07:06
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
B. of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
E. to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.

This question requires phrasing that will clearly relate the numbers 7 and 15 to each other, and correctly place the temporal marker to date.
  1. The words of which at the beginning of the clause do not clearly refer to any antecedent.
  2. The words of which at the beginning of the clause do not clearly refer to any antecedent, and the parenthetical expression to date is awkward and unnecessary.
  3. The word number in the first part of the clause is redundant, and the string of parenthetical expressions – 7, to date – makes the clause awkward and unclear.
  4. The phrase to date is misplaced and seems to refer to these 15 rather than any appropriate temporal marker.
  5. The phrase to date is correctly set off by itself, the phrase 7 of the 15 clearly positions the two numbers relative to each other.

Answer: E


The explanation to option A (highlighted) IMO seems to point towards the antecedent 'townships' unlike what the explanation states.
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Re: V02-10  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2015, 00:40
earnit wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
B. of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
E. to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.

This question requires phrasing that will clearly relate the numbers 7 and 15 to each other, and correctly place the temporal marker to date.
  1. The words of which at the beginning of the clause do not clearly refer to any antecedent.
  2. The words of which at the beginning of the clause do not clearly refer to any antecedent, and the parenthetical expression to date is awkward and unnecessary.
  3. The word number in the first part of the clause is redundant, and the string of parenthetical expressions – 7, to date – makes the clause awkward and unclear.
  4. The phrase to date is misplaced and seems to refer to these 15 rather than any appropriate temporal marker.
  5. The phrase to date is correctly set off by itself, the phrase 7 of the 15 clearly positions the two numbers relative to each other.

Answer: E


The explanation to option A (highlighted) IMO seems to point towards the antecedent 'townships' unlike what the explanation states.



i would agree with what he has pointed out
i don't get why a is wrong
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New post 02 Oct 2015, 02:14
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This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
B. of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
E. to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.

A is incorrect as which is singular and cannot refer to plural townships 7 out of 15.
B is incorrect as number is singular as well and we cannot use verb are to refer number 7 of the 15.
C is incorrect as same as of B.
D is incorrect for below reasons

I feel these is wrong for below explanation from Mgmat SC
Quote:
Finally, on the GMAT, do not use this or these in place of nouns. A sentence such as This is great is unacceptably
vague to the GMAT. Also, do not use that or those in place of nouns, unless you modify that
or those to make them New Copies. Instead, use it, they, or them.
Wrong: Her products are unusual; many consider THESE unique.
Right: Her products are unusual; many consider THEM unique.


Correct them if I'm wrong. :)
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Re: V02-10  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2015, 02:25
Mechmeera wrote:
This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
B. of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
E. to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.

A is incorrect as which is singular and cannot refer to plural townships 7 out of 15.
B is incorrect as number is singular as well and we cannot use verb are to refer number 7 of the 15.
C is incorrect as same as of B.
D is incorrect for below reasons

I feel these is wrong for below explanation from Mgmat SC
Quote:
Finally, on the GMAT, do not use this or these in place of nouns. A sentence such as This is great is unacceptably
vague to the GMAT. Also, do not use that or those in place of nouns, unless you modify that
or those to make them New Copies. Instead, use it, they, or them.
Wrong: Her products are unusual; many consider THESE unique.
Right: Her products are unusual; many consider THEM unique.


Correct them if I'm wrong. :)


Hi,
'which' can refer to plural nouns/clauses etc....
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New post 02 Oct 2015, 03:10
chetan2u wrote:
Hi,
'which' can refer to plural nouns/clauses etc....


can u explain this further?
Also explain the difference between the rules for which and of which?
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New post 02 Oct 2015, 07:36
Mechmeera wrote:
chetan2u wrote:
Hi,
'which' can refer to plural nouns/clauses etc....


can u explain this further?
Also explain the difference between the rules for which and of which?


Hi,
which can refer to both singular and plural both....
example of plural... the london museum has a huge collection of historical documents, which were written by famous authors.
only point to be seen is that the verb after 'which' agrees to the noun being referred to...
you can refer to any OG and look at the examples to further clear this doubt, as OG is the bible for GMAT

Difference between which, in which, and of which....
when you are describing the noun in totality, 'which ' is used...
the london museum has a huge collection of historical documents, which were written by famous authors.
when you are describing a part of it, 'of which' is used
as mentioned in the question in this thread...This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence
'in which' is used when we are talking of constituent of something
there were beautiful markets, in which the traders came from far off to sell their artifacts..
hope it helped
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New post 02 Oct 2015, 09:07
chetan2u wrote:
when you are describing a part of it, 'of which' is used
as mentioned in the question in this thread...This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence


sorry to bother you again but according to you in above example of which refers to 15 new townships
but according to the bb solution the same sentence in option A is incorrect as it does not a proper antecedent.

can you explain?
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New post 18 Oct 2015, 06:58
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. This Q is doubtful. A colon, by the way, sh be followed by something that explains the part before the colon. A semicolon makes more sense in this sentence.

This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships; to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.
- this sentence is 100% correct.
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New post 09 Nov 2015, 11:31
I think this is a poor-quality question and the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate.
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New post 09 Nov 2015, 23:57
Can anyone plz confirm the correct ans? Option (A) seems to be correct. The usage "of which" is correct.
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New post 29 Nov 2015, 03:03
of which ,can refer to process or 15 townships..m not sure about this as I selected choice A...
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New post 03 Jun 2016, 03:44
I think this the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate.
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New post 11 Jun 2016, 08:46
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rpriya wrote:
I think this the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate.


Let me try to elaborate further why options 1-4 are incorrect:

1. Since a semicolon is used at the end of the first clause, the underlined part of the sentence must be an independent clause. "of which...." is a dependent clause and hence wrong.

2. Since a semicolon is used at the end of the first clause, the underlined part of the sentence must be an independent clause. "of which...." is a dependent clause and hence wrong.

3. The usage of "number" is not correct. "15" refers to the number of "townships", not the "number" itself. Hence usage of the word "number" is incorrect.

4. The phrase "of these 15" is misplaced, and should follow "7".

If the above does not clarify your queries, please feel free to post further. Please specify your doubt specifically so that we may address the same properly.
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Re: V02-10  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2016, 13:29
[quote="Bunuel"]This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships; of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
B. of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
E. to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence

I have a doubt here. How do we know that we are referring to the Townships, isn't the phrase ambiguous?
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New post 29 Jun 2016, 13:39
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Avigano wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships; of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

A. of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
B. of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
C. of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
D. to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
E. to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence

I have a doubt here. How do we know that we are referring to the Townships, isn't the phrase ambiguous?


This is another example of the subgroup modifier. Once again refer to the list of correct usages in my previous post:
v11-213065.html#p1703401

This time refer to the first correct example:
Right: This model explains all known subatomic particles, SOME OF WHICH WERE only recently discovered.

In the subject question, the structure is the same. "7" replaces "some" and "them" replaces "the 15".
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New post 28 May 2017, 05:07
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. A poor question with a poor explanantion. Please check the solutions you provider. Not at all happy with the quality
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New post 04 Jul 2017, 01:46
I think this is a high-quality question and the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate. The explanation states that 'of which' does not have a clear antecedent. However, isn't '15 new townships' which appears exactly before 'of which' a clear antecedent? I marked A as correct. Please elaborate on what constitutes as a clear antecedent.
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New post 25 Oct 2017, 12:24
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Bottomline... simply look at the semicolon. A semicolon must connect independent clauses which means the clause after semicolon must be independent. A & B are not, hence ruled out. Among C, D & E, E is most concise!

But I agree that the explanations aren't clear. "of which" clearly refers to the antecedent "15 new townships".
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Re: V02-10   [#permalink] 25 Oct 2017, 12:24

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