GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 23 Sep 2018, 03:51

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

V61-05

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Founder
Founder
User avatar
V
Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 17334
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V42
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
V61-05  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Sep 2018, 00:13
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

In 2005, near the small town of Dmanisi, Georgia, a 1.8 million-year-old skull was discovered by the anthropologist David Lordkipanidze. The skull was not the first archeological finding uncovered in the area, but in fact was the most recent of five skulls, all said to be from the same era. The skull, simply named Dmanisi skull 5, is the most complete skull specimen of a Pleistocene Homo species, and the oldest complete adult hominin skull found to date. What is truly groundbreaking about the discovery, however, is that it provides evidence to suggest that two species of early hominins, Homo rudolfensis and Homo habilis, are actually both subspecies of Homo erectus. Furthermore, the discovery also implies that the Homo erectus georgicus ventured out of Africa as far back as 1.85 million years ago, hundreds of thousands of years earlier than anthropologists had previously thought.
Naturally, the skull has been the cause of a paleontological controversy, one still going on today. While these findings are quite compelling, even Lordkipanidze himself admits that his interpretation of the Dmanisi discoveries is far from certain. Skeptics tend to point to the clear differences between the skulls of Dmanisi and the skull structure of Homo erectus. They note that the Dmanisi skulls are smaller and rounded instead of angled at the back, which is reminiscent of the earlier species, Homo habilis, which appeared in Africa two million years ago. Those who support the notion of a single lineage mention the multiple features of the Dmanisi skulls, particularly skull 5, which resemble those of classic homo erectus fossils. These features include straight brow ridges, a line of heavy bone running front-to-back across the top of the skull, and the shape of the nasal cavity. Although there has yet to be a clear agreement regarding the meaning of these findings, it is clear that the long-held notions as to which of our ancestors first left Africa, when they left, and why, have been challenged.

The author uses the word ‘naturally’ in the second paragraph because

A. the discovery concerns the natural sciences.
B. the finding would inevitably cause controversy given that it has yet to be authenticated.
C. the interpretation of this finding is so groundbreaking, that it is completely logical that it would cause dispute among researchers.
D. given that the interpretation of the finding is not yet conclusive, it makes sense people will have different opinions about its meaning.
E. this discovery relates to a common and long-held disagreement among researchers.

_________________

Founder of GMAT Club

Just starting out with GMAT? Start here...
OG2019 Directory is here! - New!
Verbal OG2019 Directory is here! - New!

Co-author of the GMAT Club tests

Founder
Founder
User avatar
V
Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 17334
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V42
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re V61-05  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Sep 2018, 00:13
Official Solution:

In 2005, near the small town of Dmanisi, Georgia, a 1.8 million-year-old skull was discovered by the anthropologist David Lordkipanidze. The skull was not the first archeological finding uncovered in the area, but in fact was the most recent of five skulls, all said to be from the same era. The skull, simply named Dmanisi skull 5, is the most complete skull specimen of a Pleistocene Homo species, and the oldest complete adult hominin skull found to date. What is truly groundbreaking about the discovery, however, is that it provides evidence to suggest that two species of early hominins, Homo rudolfensis and Homo habilis, are actually both subspecies of Homo erectus. Furthermore, the discovery also implies that the Homo erectus georgicus ventured out of Africa as far back as 1.85 million years ago, hundreds of thousands of years earlier than anthropologists had previously thought.
Naturally, the skull has been the cause of a paleontological controversy, one still going on today. While these findings are quite compelling, even Lordkipanidze himself admits that his interpretation of the Dmanisi discoveries is far from certain. Skeptics tend to point to the clear differences between the skulls of Dmanisi and the skull structure of Homo erectus. They note that the Dmanisi skulls are smaller and rounded instead of angled at the back, which is reminiscent of the earlier species, Homo habilis, which appeared in Africa two million years ago. Those who support the notion of a single lineage mention the multiple features of the Dmanisi skulls, particularly skull 5, which resemble those of classic homo erectus fossils. These features include straight brow ridges, a line of heavy bone running front-to-back across the top of the skull, and the shape of the nasal cavity. Although there has yet to be a clear agreement regarding the meaning of these findings, it is clear that the long-held notions as to which of our ancestors first left Africa, when they left, and why, have been challenged.


The author uses the word ‘naturally’ in the second paragraph because

A. the discovery concerns the natural sciences.
B. the finding would inevitably cause controversy given that it has yet to be authenticated.
C. the interpretation of this finding is so groundbreaking, that it is completely logical that it would cause dispute among researchers.
D. given that the interpretation of the finding is not yet conclusive, it makes sense people will have different opinions about its meaning.
E. this discovery relates to a common and long-held disagreement among researchers.

We’ll go for the ExamPal Strategy called LOGICAL because the answer doesn’t appear explicitly in the text.

The first paragraph explains how unprecedented these findings and their interpretations are. Since a groundbreaking discovery necessarily contradicts existing opinions (the text explicitly says it implies something different from what anthropologists had thought up to this point) it is logical that it would lead to a dispute

Answer: C
_________________

Founder of GMAT Club

Just starting out with GMAT? Start here...
OG2019 Directory is here! - New!
Verbal OG2019 Directory is here! - New!

Co-author of the GMAT Club tests

GMAT Club Bot
Re V61-05 &nbs [#permalink] 05 Sep 2018, 00:13
Display posts from previous: Sort by

V61-05

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: chetan2u, Bunuel

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.