GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 25 Sep 2018, 16:28

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: Getting strong now, I'm so strong now!!!
Affiliations: National Institute of Technology, Durgapur
Joined: 04 Jun 2013
Posts: 484
Location: India
GPA: 3.32
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2014, 14:21
3
2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

90% (01:20) correct 10% (01:40) wrong based on 600 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes often spin rapidly on the water’s surface, pecking for food during each revolution. To execute these spins, phalaropes kick one leg harder than the other. This action creates upwelling currents. Because plankton on which phalaropes feed typically occurs in greater quantities well below the surface, it is hypothesized that by spinning phalaropes gain access to food that would otherwise be beyond their reach.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the hypothesis?

A. Phalaropes rarely feed while on land.
B. A given phalarope spins exclusively either to the right or to the left.
C. Phalaropes sometimes spin when they are not feeding.
D. Different phalaropes spin at somewhat different rates.
E. Phalaropes do not usually spin when food is abundant at the surface.

_________________

Regards,

S

Consider +1 KUDOS if you find this post useful

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2010
Posts: 11
Re: When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2014, 20:46
A. Phalaropes rarely feed while on land.---out of scope
B. A given phalarope spins exclusively either to the right or to the left.---out of scope
C. Phalaropes sometimes spin when they are not feeding.---weakener
D. Different phalaropes spin at somewhat different rates.---out of scope
E. Phalaropes do not usually spin when food is abundant at the surface. ---we can check this answer by negation. If phalaropes DO usually spin when food is abundant at the surface. [i]This answers clearly breaks the conclusion. [/i]
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Manager
Affiliations: Manager
Joined: 06 Nov 2012
Posts: 150
Location: India
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Sustainability
Schools: Boston U '19 (D)
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V29
GMAT 2: 680 Q49 V33
GPA: 3
WE: Supply Chain Management (Energy and Utilities)
Re: When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2014, 01:35
3
When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes often spin rapidly on the water’s surface, pecking for food during each revolution. To execute these spins, phalaropes kick one leg harder than the other. This action creates upwelling currents. Because plankton on which phalaropes feed typically occurs in greater quantities well below the surface, it is hypothesized that by spinning phalaropes gain access to food that would otherwise be beyond their reach.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the hypothesis?

Pr.: Phalaropes spin rapidly on water’s surface, pecking for food during each revolution which occurs in greater quantities well below the surface.
Conc.: By spinning, Phalaropes gain access to food that would otherwise be beyond their reach.


A. Phalaropes rarely feed while on land - Doesn't affect argument. Even if they feed primarily on water's surface, it doesn't mean that they do it while spinning.
B. A given phalarope spins exclusively either to the right or to the left - No effect on conclusion how they spin.
C. Phalaropes sometimes spin when they are not feeding - mild weakener instead of strengthener.
D. Different phalaropes spin at somewhat different rates - Irrelevant.

E. Phalaropes do not usually spin when food is abundant at the surface - Correct. It supports hypothesis by stating that they do spin only when food is scarce and do not spin when it is abundant.

Kudos please..... :wink:
_________________

Hard-work, Perseverance and Commitment.....

Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 24 Nov 2015
Posts: 540
Location: United States (LA)
Reviews Badge
Re: When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2016, 14:10
options A,B and D are out of scope options
option C is actually weakening the argument
correct answer - E
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: In the realms of Chaos & Night
Joined: 13 Sep 2015
Posts: 158
Re: When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jul 2016, 03:01
Premise: When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes often spin rapidly on the water’s surface, pecking for food during each revolution.
Premise: To execute these spins, phalaropes kick one leg harder than the other.
Premise: This action creates upwelling currents.
Conclusion: Because plankton on which phalaropes feed typically occurs in greater quantities well below the surface, it is hypothesized that by spinning phalaropes gain access to food that would otherwise be beyond their reach.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the hypothesis?
Question Type: Strength
Prephase: Kicking related to spinning related to food.

A. Phalaropes rarely feed while on land.
B. A given phalarope spins exclusively either to the right or to the left.
C. Phalaropes sometimes spin when they are not feeding.
D. Different phalaropes spin at somewhat different rates.
E. Phalaropes do not usually spin when food is abundant at the surface. - As highlighted in the passage if food is readily available at shallow depths, the need for the birds to spin does not arise.
_________________

Good luck
=========================================================================================
"If a street performer makes you stop walking, you owe him a buck"
"If this post helps you on your GMAT journey, drop a +1 Kudo "


"Thursdays with Ron - Consolidated Verbal Master List - Updated"

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 2982
Premium Member
Re: When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2018, 00:23
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes &nbs [#permalink] 08 Sep 2018, 00:23
Display posts from previous: Sort by

When feeding, aquatic birds known as phalaropes

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.