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A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of

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A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of developing heart disease. Regular consumption of red wine reduces that risk. Per-capita consumption of saturated fats is currently about the same in France as in the United States, but there is less heart disease there than in the United States because consumption of red wine is higher in France. The difference in regular red-wine consumption has been narrowing, but no similar convergence in heart-disease rates has occurred.

Which of the following, if true, most helps to account for the lack of convergence noted above?

A. Consumption of saturated fats is related more strongly to the growth of fatty deposits on artery walls, which reduce blood flow to the heart, than it is to heart disease directly.

B. Over the past 30 years, per-capita consumption of saturated fats has remained essentially unchanged in the United States but has increased somewhat in France.

C. Reports of the health benefits of red wine have led many people in the United States to drink red wine regularly.

D. Cigarette smoking, which can also contribute to heart disease, is only slightly more common in France than in the United States.

E. Regular consumption of red wine is declining dramatically among young adults in France, and heart disease typically does not manifest itself until middle age.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2004, 16:57
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E for me
If consumption of wine by youngsters has declined, it would explain why, despite the overall narrowing of wine consumption b/w US/France, there is no change in the overall heart disease; the decrease of wine consumption affects only younger people who are not affected by heart diseases (only middle-aged people are affected)
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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2004, 20:55
Paul wrote:
E for me
If consumption of wine by youngsters has declined, it would explain why, despite the overall narrowing of wine consumption b/w US/France, there is no change in the overall heart disease; the decrease of wine consumption affects only younger people who are not affected by heart diseases (only middle-aged people are affected)


Paul , can you explain what does the last sentence in the passage mean?

I'm comfusing.

Thank you

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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2004, 21:01
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The difference in regular red-wine consumption has been narrowing, but no similar convergence in heart-disease rates has occurred

The above means that either US population has been drinking more red wine or France population has been drinking less wine so that their wine consumption narrowed (the gap in wine consumption b/w the two diminished)
E explains why wine consumption dimished in France (youngsters drink less of it) but why heart diseases are still high(because only middle-aged people are affected). This resolves the paradox at hand
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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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Got E too. Agree with Paul's explanation. To add,

"The difference in regular red-wine consumption has been narrowing" may mean two things - US is drinking more wine OR france is drinking less wine. ETS trap would be make us think that the first (US drinking more wine) has happened, but actually it is the second case (E).

Moreover, E, by bringing in "heart disease typically does not manifest itself until middle age" shows that the convergence of heart disease may happen in future, but not immediately.

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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2004, 08:09
Got E as well with the reasoning same as Paul's

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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2004, 09:30
Thank you, Paul

the OA really is (E)

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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2004, 16:10
chunjuwu - would you mind sharing the source of these CR questions you are posting ? If you can offer some more it would be helpful. I find that your CR series of questions like CR0214, CR0316 are of very high quality. I am only asking because i needed some more CR practice material.

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A diet high in saturated fats increases a person s risk of [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2009, 06:53
A diet high in saturated fats increases a person’s risk of developing heart disease. Regular consumption of red wine reduces that risk. Per-capita consumption of saturated fats is currently about the same in France as in the United States, but there is less heart disease there than in the United States because consumption of red wine is higher in France. The difference in regular red-wine consumption has been narrowing, but no similar convergence in heart-disease rates has occurred.

Which of the following, if true, most helps to account for the lack of convergence noted above?

A. Consumption of saturated fats is related more strongly to the growth of fatty deposits on artery walls, which reduce blood flow to the heart, than it is to heart disease directly.
B. Over the past 30 years, per-capita consumption of saturated fats has remained essentially unchanged in the United States but has increased somewhat in France.
C. Reports of the health benefits of red wine have led many people in the United States to drink red wine regularly.
D. Cigarette smoking, which can also contribute to heart disease, is only slightly more common in France than in the United States.
E. Regular consumption of red wine is declining dramatically among young adults in France, and heart disease typically does not manifest itself until middle age.

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2009, 08:12
reply2spg wrote:
A diet high in saturated fats increases a person’s risk of developing heart disease. Regular consumption of red wine reduces that risk. Per-capita consumption of saturated fats is currently about the same in France as in the United States, but there is less heart disease there than in the United States because consumption of red wine is higher in France. The difference in regular red-wine consumption has been narrowing, but no similar convergence in heart-disease rates has occurred.

Which of the following, if true, most helps to account for the lack of convergence noted above?

A. Consumption of saturated fats is related more strongly to the growth of fatty deposits on artery walls, which reduce blood flow to the heart, than it is to heart disease directly. Irrelevant
B. Over the past 30 years, per-capita consumption of saturated fats has remained essentially unchanged in the United States but has increased somewhat in France. If so, there should not be convergence in F
C. Reports of the health benefits of red wine have led many people in the United States to drink red wine regularly. Similar convergence should occur but not
D. Cigarette smoking, which can also contribute to heart disease, is only slightly more common in France than in the United States. If F has more smokers than US, F should have more lack of convergence.
E. Regular consumption of red wine is declining dramatically among young adults in France, and heart disease typically does not manifest itself until middle age.

So the convergence might be gone soon in F. Previously people were drinking red wine and we are seeing convergence as a result of that. Now they are not and hence it will be gone. Not the best reason but seems to be the best one. I am not sure how it addresses the lack of convergence in US.



E remained.

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2009, 19:26
None of the answer choices seem to be correct

I think E does not adress the lack of convergence

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2009, 03:23
I think its D

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2009, 04:16
IMO E.
Consumption is declining therefore the gap is reducing but no convergence observed till now because disease does not come until middle age.
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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2009, 07:28
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
IMO E.
Consumption is declining therefore the gap is reducing but no convergence observed till now because disease does not come until middle age.


agree with saha's explanation on this.

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2009, 13:15
OA E

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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C

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2009, 17:28
E seems to be the right answer.

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2009, 01:58
E seems 2 b the most relevant choice.

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Re: CR: Red Wine [#permalink]

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Re: A diet high in saturated fats increases a person's risk of [#permalink]

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