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A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to

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A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 18 Dec 2018, 00:29
2
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A
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E

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A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to carry out a legislative program.


(A) likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to

(B) likely severely disadvantaged and often unable to

(C) liable to be severely disadvantaged and cannot often

(D) liable that he or she is at a severe disadvantage and cannot often

(E) at a severe disadvantage, often likely to be unable that he or she can

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Originally posted by lahoosaher on 05 Jun 2009, 01:52.
Last edited by Bunuel on 18 Dec 2018, 00:29, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2014, 01:39
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3
noboru wrote:
A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to carry out a legislative program.
(A) likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to
(B) likely severely disadvantaged and often unable to
(C) liable to be severely disadvantaged and cannot often
(D) liable that he or she is at a severe disadvantage and cannot often
(E) at a severe disadvantage, often likely to be unable that he or she can


The correct idioms are:

X is likely to Y
X is at a disadvantage
X is unable to Y

Only answer choice A give us all of these correct idioms.

In answer choice A, likely is an adjective.

Any form of the verb to be indicates a state of being. The subject, which is a noun, cannot be an adverb. The subject can be only an adjective or another noun.

Mary is happy. (noun = adjective)

Mary is an astronaut. (noun = noun)

Not: Mary is quickly. (A noun cannot = adverb).

Hope this helps!
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Re: A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2009, 05:00
amolsk11 wrote:
A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to carry out a legislative program.
(A) likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to
(B) likely severely disadvantaged and often unable to
(C) liable to be severely disadvantaged and cannot often
(D) liable that he or she is at a severe disadvantage and cannot often
(E) at a severe disadvantage, often likely to be unable that he or she can


The tested idiom here is "likely to be", so keep that in mind:
a) seems fine so hold it
b) "likely" without the "to", so it's wrong
c) I don't think that "liable to be" even exists
d) because of the use of "that", it would make better sense to have "so" before "liable", but we don't have that, so wrong
e) "often" and "likely" are redundant.

So option A remains as the correct answer.
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Re: A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2010, 21:06
tarek99 wrote:
The tested idiom here is "likely to be", so keep that in mind:
a) seems fine so hold it
b) "likely" without the "to", so it's wrong
c) I don't think that "liable to be" even exists
d) because of the use of "that", it would make better sense to have "so" before "liable", but we don't have that, so wrong
e) "often" and "likely" are redundant.


Disadvantage is a NOUN or a TRANSITIVE VERB with following usage
a) were at a disadvantage
b) worked to their disadvantage
c) was a serious disadvantage

I found that disadvantaged is also used sometimes like:
The disadvantaged are becoming more economically disadvantaged.

A - CORRECT
Aren't B and C wrong because "severely disadvantaged" is incorrect?
D - liable that seems incorrect
E -often likely to be unable is wordy and awkward

Forgot to mention that I am really confused with this one!
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Re: A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2012, 15:05
1
A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to carry out a legislative program.

(A) likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to
(B) likely severely disadvantaged and often unable to
(C) liable to be severely disadvantaged and cannot often
(D) liable that he or she is at a severe disadvantage and cannot often
(E) at a severe disadvantage, often likely to be unable that he or she can



I picked c as an answer, but I couldn't find anybody who picked c when I googled this question.
People mentioned several reasons why c wasn't the answer, but I am confused with a couple of those reasons.

1. "liable" is incorrect.
( I looked up this word and found the exact same meaning as "likely")

2. "disadvanged" is not idiomatic.

3. "at a disadvantage."
According to "Dictionary.com", it means "in a position that gives one person an advantage over another."
This is an example. Having too little money to spend has put me at a disadvantage with my friends.

Is this correct? Cannot apply this definition to A. If I do, the sentence doesn't make sense to me.

4. "cannot often" changed the meaning of the original sentence slightly.
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Re: A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2012, 19:52
3
I see this one sat unanswered over the weekend so I'll attempt to explain the best I can.

Quote:
1. "liable" is incorrect.
( I looked up this word and found the exact same meaning as "likely")

You're correct, "liable" is not the problem, though a less common in the English vernacular.

Quote:
2. "disadvanged" is not idiomatic.

I believe what the point is here is that "at a (severe) disadvantage" and "severely disadvantaged" imply two entirely different things. In this case, being "at a disadvantage" is a comparative observation between either the President and Congress (assuming US politics) or between the President in his/her final two years in office and the President in his/her term before his/her final two years. Being "disadvantaged" implies the President has some long-standing hardship to overcome. Does reaching the final two years of a President's term inhibit his/her ability to legislate? Assuming no other variables are entering, the answer is "no", so an idiom is used to describe the situation.

Example: GMAT test-taker scores 700+ consistently on GMAT exams. However, on the next exam, the test-taker is sick with the flu. The test-taker is "at a disadvantage" while ill but obviously not necessarily "disadvantaged".

Alternatively, the "disadvantaged" test-taker (perhaps learning disability, no formal education, etc.) is in an entirely different boat than the ill test-taker.

Quote:
3. "at a disadvantage."
According to "Dictionary.com", it means "in a position that gives one person an advantage over another."
This is an example. Having too little money to spend has put me at a disadvantage with my friends.

Is this correct? Cannot apply this definition to A. If I do, the sentence doesn't make sense to me.

See explanation for #2 - President vs. Congress or President vs self at another point in time

Quote:
4. "cannot often" changed the meaning of the original sentence slightly.

I would argue this explanation as incorrect. The second problem I see with C is the omission of "is" following "and". The name for this escapes me (as have most technical terms to describe the English language outside of noun, verb, etc).

Hope this helps.
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Re: A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2013, 03:21
After going through the archives of RON videos and the use of 'and' as a connector here is my doubt:


A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to carry out a legislative program.

AND should connect independent IDEAS. However, in this sentence the disadvantage is not followed by what type of disadvantage , but it is explicitly stated.


A President Blah Blah.........is likely to be at a severe disadvantage, Something about disadvantage.

Enlighten Plz !!
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Re: A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2016, 01:30
disadvantaged.
is not a participle 2 of a verb. it is purely an adjective. it mean having no education money to succeed.

at a disadvantage
mean not a good position to do something

so "at a disadvange" is correct meaning here.

the dictionary offer explanation of these two meanings.
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A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2018, 20:36
lahoosaher wrote:
A President entering the final two years of a second term is likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to carry out a legislative program.


(A) likely to be at a severe disadvantage and is often unable to - Correct: Idiomatic. No issues. Clear meaning and parallelism.

(B) likely severely disadvantaged and often unable to - Wrong: 1) "likely severely disadvantaged" is unidiomatic. Adjective "likely" can only modify a noun and not another adjective "disadvantaged". 2) GMAT prefers choices with repeated helping verb such as "is", which is missing in B but used in A.

(C) liable to be severely disadvantaged and cannot often - Wrong: "liable" distorts meaning.

(D) liable that he or she is at a severe disadvantage and cannot often - Wrong: "liable" distorts meaning.

(E) at a severe disadvantage, often likely to be unable that he or she can - Wrong: 1) "often likely" together are redundant. 2) Unidiomatic: "unable that". Correct idiom is "unable to". 3) Wordy
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