GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 Dec 2018, 07:47

TODAY:

MIT Sloan R1 Decisions - Join MIT Chat for Live Updates | Chat with UCLA Anderson Adcom @9am PT | Chat with Yale SOM R1 Admit 10am PT


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Calling all UCLA Anderson MBA Applicants: (2019 Intake) Class of 2021

     December 19, 2018

     December 19, 2018

     09:00 AM PST

     10:00 AM PST

    Chat with UCLA Adcoms in GMATClub Chat Room. With less than a month to R2 deadline, I hope the chat session will prove to be very helpful. Wednesday, Dec 19 @ 9AM PST
  • Yale R1 Admit is Here to Answer YOUR Questions!

     December 19, 2018

     December 19, 2018

     10:00 AM PST

     11:00 AM PST

    One of our forum members, ak99 recently got accepted at Yale SOM in Round 1. He accepted our invitation to interact with the new applicants, share his insights about the application process, and answer the queries of applicants.

Accepted MBA Updates

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
How to Project Professionalism & Positivity in Your Statement of Purpo  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Nov 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Project Professionalism & Positivity in Your Statement of Purpose
Image
Image

In my previous post, I discussed the importance of maintaining an appropriate tone in your admissions essay, and provided tips for checking your tone, specifically for finding a confident tone and avoiding arrogance.

Once again, “tone” refers to a writer’s attitude toward their subject (and their reader). Your tone comes across in your choice of vocabulary, whether you choose formal or informal language, and so on. It can be subtle, but it is very important.

A strong personal statement or SOP communicates confidence, as we explain, but also professionalism and positivity. How can you ensure your writing conveys the right attitude?

Professionalism
Here are five pointers for writing with a professional tone:

  • First off, what do I mean by “professional” tone in this context?
    Think about whom you’re writing for: admissions professionals, and possibly professors (depending on your field). In other words: a. educated professionals; and b. members of the field you’re hoping to enter. This means that you should address them as you would someone you respect. No need for stilted formality – but this isn’t an email or text message to a friend, either. Grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation all count.

  • Follow all of the adcom’s directions.
    This means several things: answering the questions as they are asked; keeping to the requested length; not submitting additional materials they haven’t asked for; etc.

  • Describe your experiences, interests, and goals in a thoughtful way that shows your mature engagement with your field.
    There is, for example, both a content and a tonal difference between saying you want to study a particular language because it will give you the skills to work in international development in country X, and saying you want to study that language because you just always liked the way it sounds.

  • Let your tone show your positive, collaborative outlook.
    When you describe work you did with a team, use language that reflects that cooperation (“we”), and take a positive tone (for example, show what you gained/learned from your collaboration and how it prepared you for graduate school).

  • Remember that your professional tone should extend to every interaction you have with the school – whether written or spoken.
    Each email, phone call, visit, interview – every interaction with every person you meet at your target school must contribute to their overall picture of you as a courteous, professional, positive candidate.

To summarize:

  • Keep your audience in mind.
  • Keep every interaction you have with the adcom professional, courteous and positive.
  • One of the most common miscalculations in tone relates to this very issue of positivity. If your tone veers into the negative, the adcom will have reason to worry about your attitude.  More on this in a moment…
Positivity
Here are three tips for staying positive and avoiding negativity:

  • Spin the negative into the positive.
    We’ve written elsewhere about how it’s more compelling to read statements that are phrased positively than negatively. In other words, if one experience didn’t work out, don’t say that you decided to do something new because it was not great or a negative experience; say that you chose to move on to a new opportunity in order to develop your skills or explore an area you were excited about or assume greater responsibility. This is important both for the energy and strength of your writing, and also for your tone: if you phrase statements in a negative way, you risk coming across as negative. It’s much better to be moving towards something attractive than fleeing something ugly.

  • Pay attention to qualifying words.
    I taught undergraduate composition – I know that writers sometimes use adverbs to pad their writing! And I’m not saying that all adverbs are bad. Deployed carefully, they can help you pinpoint exactly the description you’re looking for. But sometimes, qualifiers can pull your sentence into territory you should probably avoid. Take these sentences as an example:

    • “In the end, I found the experience genuinely enjoyable.”

    • “I actually enjoyed it.”

    These words can have the effect – not always intended by the writer – of making the experience sound not truly enjoyable or impressive. (To say you “actually” enjoyed something makes it sound like you didn’t expect to – and why risk raising the adcom’s doubts about your attitude?) A more positive phrasing would simply be: “I enjoyed the experience.”
  • Don’t comment negatively on your undergraduate program (or a company you worked for).
    If you’re trying to explain a low GPA or other academic challenge, straightforwardly take responsibility for it and do not attribute your struggles to anyone else.

To summarize:

  • Phrase sentences positively (focus on what you DID, not what you didn’t do).
  • Avoid qualifying words that make you sound halfhearted or grudging.
  • Make a tone check part of your editing process, and you’ll be on your way to finding the sweet-spot: professional, positive, and confident.
[For more advice, check out my previous post, Writing Tip: Understanding the Fine Line Between Confidence and Arrogance.]

The expert advisors at Accepted can help you ensure that you are projecting a professional, positive voice in your application essays. Learn more about our Admissions Consulting & Editing Services here.

Image

Image
By Dr. Rebecca Blustein, Fellowship Advisor at UCLA and former Accepted admissions consultant.
Want one of our admissions experts to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• From Example to Exemplary, a free guide

How to Edit Your Application Essays, a podcast episode

Writing About Resilience in the Face of Failure

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post How to Project Professionalism & Positivity in Your Statement of Purpose appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
HKUST MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: HKUST MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines
Image
Image

Applicants seeking an MBA with high placement rates throughout Asia may find HKUST the perfect fit for their needs. HKUST offers two options for its MBA: a 16-month option that offers hopeful career switchers the opportunity to hold an internship in their target industry and even an experience in an exchange program abroad, and a 12-month accelerated version for students with more experience and/or who plan to return to their current employer/industry.

The Financial Times ranks HKUST #14 in the world, 72% of the class successfully changes functions following the MBA, and 69% changes industries. Thirty-nine percent of the latest graduating class found roles in the financial industry upon graduating, with respectable numbers also entering the consulting (12%), and IT/Technology (17%) industries. In terms of job functions, HKUST graduates thrive in finance roles (42%), general management (26%), and sales and marketing (11%).

The HKUST application has stayed the same this year. My tips are below in blue.

HKUST MBA Application Essays:
HKUST MBA Essay #1
The HKUST MBA mission is to inspire and transform individuals to be future business leaders for Asia and the world. We embrace diversity, and are looking for ambitious and open-minded candidates with a passion to contribute. It is the first day of orientation. Please introduce yourself to your classmates, highlighting what drives you in your personal and professional life. (500 words)

The small class of around 100 students hails from over 20 countries, with 95% of the class coming from outside of Hong Kong. Since HKUST strives for diversity throughout this small group, each applicant must demonstrate a unique perspective and experiences. If your professional background is in a heavily represented group – IT or finance for example, then I highly recommend highlighting not only your most exceptional professional experience in this essay but also the personal qualities, extracurricular involvement and values that differentiate you. When in your professional or personal life have you demonstrated an open mind and contributed? These will prove your potential at HKUST.

HKUST MBA Essay #2
Tell us about your post-MBA goals and based on that, why is the HKUST MBA the ideal program for you and how do you plan to engage and enrich our community? (500 words)

This is a traditional goals essay with a twist of tying those goals to your future engagement and enrichment of the HKUST community. The admissions office is making it clear that they expect to hear how you will enhance the education of your peers. What aspects of the program will you be able to contribute to most and how will your fellow classmates benefit?

For expert guidance with your HKUST MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MBA programs and look forward to helping you too!

HKUST MBA Application Deadlines for August 2019 Intake:

Application Deadline
Admission Notification

Phase 1
November 7, 2018
February 1, 2019

Phase 2
January 9, 2019
April 5, 2019

Phase 3
March 13, 2019
May 31, 2019

Ideally, international students should send through their applications by the first or second deadline to allow sufficient time to process their visas and for making other travel arrangements to Hong Kong. Late applications after all deadlines may be considered subject to place availability.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Image

Image
Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

• Why MBA, a free guide

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

International Student Financing Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post HKUST MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
What's New at INSEAD?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What's New at INSEAD?
Image
Image

What’s New at INSEAD? [Show Summary]
No school exemplifies the trend global business quite as much as INSEAD, which was founded in France, but has campuses in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East as well as partnerships with Wharton in the U.S., Tsinghua in China, and the Sorbonne. Virginie Fougea, Director of MBA Admissions at INSEAD will take you through the unique history of INSEAD, its mission and vision, and how you should approach the application.

Interview with Virginie Fougea, Director of MBA Recruitment and Admissions at INSEAD [Show Notes]
Today it’s my pleasure to have on the show Virginie Fougea Director of MBA Recruitment and Admissions at INSEAD. She began working at INSEAD shortly after I put Accepted on the web way back in 1996. She also participated in Accepted’s old text-only chats, typing madly away. In 2012 she became the Associate Director of Admissions at INSEAD, and on the day that I previously interviewed her for the podcast 3 years ago, she officially became Director of Admissions.

Can you give an overview of the INSEAD’s full-time MBA program for those listeners who aren’t that familiar with it? [2:24]
INSEAD was founded in 1957 by Georges Doriot, a French national and graduate and professor of Harvard. He came back to France after World War 2 and decided to promote peace and prosperity in Europe, with the idea being a common business school with different European countries working together. French, English and German were required languages at the time, though now it is just English. The institution does not belong to any government and is a private non-profit. The curriculum is designed to be taught in one year, and has been since the beginning. We now have 500 students per class, and two intakes per year, one in January and one in August. Students also choose between three campuses – the original in France, in Fontainebleau, which is 60km outside of Paris, Singapore, and Abu Dhabi.

You and I spoke a couple of weeks ago, and before we turn to admissions tips I’d like you to share with listeners some of the exciting recent developments at INSEAD. Let’s start with the €40 million gift from Andrea Hoffman Class of 90. Can you tell us how INSEAD will use the money? [4:38]
This is the single largest gift in INSEAD history and enabled us to launch the Global Institute for Business and Society, which we just launched this past week. It will be a transformative entity – working on theoretical frameworks, strategies, analytics tools, business models or new ways of teaching and disseminating knowledge. The goal is to align businesses with the societies they serve, and goes back to the vision to promote peace and prosperity. The hope is that future leaders from around the world involved in businesses will deliberately account for societal and environmental impact in their decisions as a result. The idea is that this will flow through all the entire INSEAD experience, from the coursework to green campuses.

Can you also tell us about IW50? The 50th Anniversary of INSEAD admitting the first woman to its program. [7:53]
We admitted the first two women to the MBA program 50 years ago, and were one of the first schools to do that. We wanted to recognize the leadership of women in the world, and through different events we wanted to influence the way men and women conceive of women as leaders. We brought people from everywhere in the world, from countries where women don’t have the same rights or access to education or to work even, and by having this celebration we wanted to advance women in leadership roles.

Women currently represent 35-40% of incoming classes (roughly 180 women), so we have come a long way!

Finally, on Oct 1, INSEAD announced an evolution of its mission and branding. “We bring together people, cultures and ideas to develop responsible leaders who transform business and society.”
a. Why the change? [10:25]
The brand has always evolved to reflect the ever changing world, from a European school post-WW2 to a global school based in three different continents, and we felt the need to reflect on that to see if all was still aligned. Indeed with the opening of the Global Institute it aligns with the idea that we area mission-driven school, have to bring people together, and teach people how to do business together for greater impact and return to societies, to populations, and to the environment. The logo and brand is fully aligned with our roots and current mission.

b. What are the implications of this change practically for INSEAD’s students? [12:00]
It is a confirmation of our values of tolerance and diversity, and doesn’t have an immediate impact or implication, but clearly states to the world that we clearly believe in diversity as a force for good. We have always admitted people of many different nationalities, cultures, religions, sexual orientation, passions, and professional backgrounds, and we want to promote that as part of the values of the school.

There are 94 nationalities in the class entering in 2018. With 500 people in each intake that creates tremendous diversity and very interesting discussions.

c. To applicants? [14:08]
It is very important for our applicants to be thoughtful in their applications and reflect on the vision and values as they prepare.

Let’s turn to the application, for just a second.
Can you go through the function of different application elements:
a. Online app including Job Description Questions, Motivation Essays [17:59]
The Job Description Questions are sometimes seen as essays, but here this is to help us understand an applicant’s leadership potential and ability to contribute to class discussion. People need to speak about the nature of their work and feel free to use concrete and specific examples, but it’s not an essay. Understanding the day to day work shows how the person is valued as they move along in an organization. The Motivation Essays I see as the most challenging aspect yet the most crucial. Together with the videos that is the unique opportunity for applicants to introduce themselves. People explain achievements, motivation for the program, the values of INSEAD, thinking patterns, value set, etc.

b. In supporting documentation: CV, Letters of rec, video interview [24:00]
We ask for the CV so they have already started thinking about the job search in the MBA program. Some people have not written a CV since the end of their undergrad studies, perhaps working 3-5 years not needing to update one. It also gives us more information about their activities and responsibilities, and complements the application form. We provide a template which is what is distributed to recruiting companies, so it is the objective for the applicant to use that, but they can use another template if they want.

For recommendation letters, the first thing people need to understand is they should select people who know them really well in their day-to-day activities, since there are questions related to leadership potential and ability to contribute.

With the video interview, it provides the opportunity to introduce yourself, show leadership, motivation for the INSEAD program, etc., and people do a great job with them. It is also a tool to assess English skills, poise, and just to shine. We get an understanding of communication skills and lots of things that are subtle like body language, but shouldn’t be seen as a barrier to entry. It is another element we consider. If the video interview didn’t go as well as you’d hoped, it’s ok.

What can an applicant expect in an INSEAD interview? [30:26]
They are conducted by alumni, which is very specific to INSEAD. We want our alumni to be part of the interview process because we want applicants to be able to ask questions of the alumni. Also, alums know what it takes, what the program did for them both personally and professionally, so the idea is to have an exchange and conversation between alum and applicant, seeing the applicant as if they were in the program. So the alum is assessing how this person would contribute to the program, what will they share with the rest of the class, etc. Because of the diversity of INSEAD, with applicants coming from many different countries, we rely on our alums so applicants don’t need to travel for interviews. We are very careful of potential cultural biases, and having interviewers who are local gets rid of or at least brings awareness to the potential biases. The interviews can be conducted in English or the native language (with at least part in English). The admissions officer in charge of the applicant will carefully select the interviewer, not just randomly pick one who is available. It is someone who has graduated a few years ago, and most likely someone from a sector similar to the applicant.

What advice do you have for an applicant planning to submit by the January 9 (R3) deadline for the 9/2019 Intake or for the Feb. 20 deadline for the R1 Jan 2020 Intake? [35:24]
The first thing that is often asked to be confirmed is if they have more chance in R1. We know the qualities we are looking for, and places will still be available in R4. The only issue for R4 applicants is they are left to non-scholarship offers because scholarship decisions are made earlier.

What advice do you have for applicants planning ahead for the Sept. 2020 Intake or later? [37:17]
First one that comes to mind is talk to alumni if they can, since it is a good way to get a feel for the program. If they happen to be in one of the three locations we are happy to host them on campus. Also, start thinking about who could be the right recommenders.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [38:10]
No questions, I think, but maybe I’d just like to reiterate the point to not hesitate to reach out to the teams we have, as we have people who are happy to guide applicants. It is easy now through social media to get in touch with us.

Image

Related Links:

INSEAD MBA Admissions

INSEAD MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines

Get Accepted to INSEAD, an on-demand webinar

Accepted’s MBA Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School

How to Get a Georgetown MBA

NYU Stern 2018-19 MBA Admissions Scoop: An Interview with Isser Gallogly

• Getting Accepted to U.S. Universities from Abroad

• Yale Som: Integrated in Its Curriculum, with Its University, and to the World

Subscribe:

   Image
       Image

Podcast Feed

Image

Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post What’s New at INSEAD? [Episode 285] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Save Big with Our Fall Sale!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Nov 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Save Big with Our Fall Sale!
Image
Image

Applying to college, b-school, law school, a masters, or PhD program this year? You’re probably finding it’s crunch time, with some if not all of your application deadlines falling between now and the end of January.

Are you worried about whether your application is as strong as it can be? Will you have everything ready in time? Let one of our admissions consultants help you manage the process and put together the best possible application, and save big at the same time!

Between November 13-20, we’re offering a special discount on non-rush purchases. With the discount code SAVENOW, you’ll save $500 on orders over $5000, $200 on orders over $2000, or $100 on orders over $1000.

Don’t let this opportunity to work one-on-one with an admissions expert pass you by. Our consultants can provide assistance with every part of your application journey – from building a strategy, to editing essays and resumes, to helping you prepare for interviews.

Image

Shop today, and save big with SAVENOW!

Image

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Save Big with Our Fall Sale! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
What Exactly Are Goals?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What Exactly Are Goals?
Image
Image

“I want to move from the buy side to the sell side.”

I want to shift from technology consulting to investment banking.”

Not goals.

An engineer once said to me, “I want to go into either finance or consulting.”

Not goals.

A goal isn’t something you want, it’s something you do, something you want to achieve, an impact you want to have, and the process you plan on implementing in order to get there. Therefore, a goal needs to be specific. Start with two key components:

  • Industry
  • Function
A third key component for many people is geography, if it is integral to the goal (e.g., developing solar energy in northern Africa).

Then add the “do” part – what the work will actually consist of, and what you hope to accomplish.

Here are some examples that incorporate the above elements:

  • I plan to return to operations but work at a higher, decision making level, such as Senior Operations Manager, in an East Asian semiconductor firm or a related industry. In this role, I would, for example, oversee $XXX operations, a global high-tech supply chain, and manage a diverse range of technical and business professionals.
  • Currently I’m a BPR consultant; I plan to shift to strategy consulting at a top global firm such as Bain or McKinsey, ideally focusing on clients in the pharma/biomedical space, and help them set up operations in Eastern Europe.
To wrap up this section, I’ll add a couple of cautions about this phase of the process:

  • It’s true that your short-term goals operate as a means towards achieving your long-term goals, but don’t simply focus on what you will learn, the experience you will gain, and the people you will meet; short-term goals should also include the elements noted above – what you want to do and accomplish/contribute.
  • Ensure that your goals really require the MBA education. Of course, any learning is helpful for almost any endeavor; but the adcoms want to see that you really need the resources they offer, which they view as precious and not to be squandered. (And they’re right!)
Do you need help identifying, defining, and writing about your goals? Work one-on-one with an expert admissions advisor who will help you clarify your goals and present them to the adcom so you get ACCEPTED. Learn more about MBA Admissions Services here.

“What Exactly Are Goals?” is excerpted from the Accepted guide, Why MBA? Click here to download the complete guide.

Image

Image
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips, a free guide

The Importance of Defining Your MBA Goal

Your MBA Goals Essay: Get Ready, Get Set, THINK!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What Exactly Are Goals? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Why Do You Need an MBA? [MBA Interview Questions Series]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Why Do You Need an MBA? [MBA Interview Questions Series]
Image
Image

This blog post is part of a series of articles analyzing some of the most popular MBA interview questions and offering tips on how to best respond to them. In this post, we’ll address “Why do you need an MBA?”

“Why do you need an MBA?”
This is one of the most common questions asked in an MBA interview. It seems like a straightforward, simple question, but have you taken the time to ask it yourself? If you have, then you know it’s not as easy to answer as it may seem.

To score an interview with the adcom, you must write a stellar personal background essay. Download this sample essay and see how one student won over the adcom and got accepted into their top-choice MBA program.

Image

So why do interviewers always ask this question, and how do you answer it in a way that will help you show fit, stand out, and gain acceptance to your top-choice business school?

Here is what our MBA admissions experts have to say.

What Is the Reason for Asking This Question?
The interviewer wants to make sure your reasons for getting an MBA match up with what the MBA degree will provide you.

Image

How Do You Prepare Your Answer?
Coming from almost any function, the likely answer to the “Why MBA?” question is that you have a significant amount of depth in a particular field (marketing, finance, IT, engineering), but in order to break free of being labeled as simply a subject matter expert, you need more breadth.

Image

Most people look to get an MBA in order to move into a management role or to change fields. To succeed in management, you need to have an understanding of all functional areas of business, from finance to operations to technology and more. An MBA degree provides the toolbox you need to succeed in management in the shortest amount of time.

For career-switchers, a full-time MBA program provides one of the best opportunities to make that switch. It gives you access to critical coursework, training in “soft skills” and leadership, the all-important summer internship, and more.

Important Things You Should Remember
This is not meant to be a “gotcha” question, and you should in no way feel threatened by it. The interviewer simply wants to ensure that your expectations for the MBA are in line with what the program delivers. They want to know you are realistic.

Additional Things to Consider
There is no doubt that adding an MBA degree to your resume will bolster credibility and prestige. You want to make sure you don’t come across as someone only interested in an MBA degree because of the pedigree. That is a big turn off.

Image

You must be transparent about your MBA aspirations. Your answer must be meaningful, credible, engaging, and of course, genuine. It must clearly explain to the adcom how an MBA will help you achieve your goals.

If you want to prepare for your interviews — and reduce your stress levels — take a look at our Mock Interview Package.

This comprehensive package includes a 20-30 minute mock interview, feedback and suggestions for improvement, and expert strategies and tips for your interviewing school.

Since many applicants possess a similar academic background, GMAT score, and GPA, you must find another way to stand out, and that’s through your personal background essay.

In need of other consulting services? View our full list here!

Image

Image
Jen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing. Want Jen to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interview, a free guide

Getting Your MBA Goals in Shape

• 4 Steps to Preparing for MBA Interviews

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Why Do You Need an MBA? [MBA Interview Questions Series] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Bloomberg Businessweek Announces Best U.S. Business Schools  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Nov 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Bloomberg Businessweek Announces Best U.S. Business Schools
Image
Image

Bloomberg Businessweek conducted its 2018 survey of 10,473 MBA students, 15,050 alumni, and 3,698 recruiters about their business school experiences and their goals. Their answers, in addition to information about salary and job-placement data from each school, combined to create each school’s rank. The ranking of non-U.S. programs will be released in December 2018.

Rankings were determined by how well each school did in each of the four weighted indexes: Compensation (38.5%), Networking (27.9%), Learning (23.1%), and Entrepreneurship (10.5%). These weights were determined by questions asked about the importance of each one to responders of the survey.

Bloomberg Business changed its ranking methodology since the 2017 ranking. Therefore a comparison between 2017 and 2018 rankings is not possible.

Here are the top 25 business schools in the survey:

RankSchoolScore

1Stanford GSB100

2Pennsylvania Wharton92.6

3Harvard Business School91.9

4MIT Sloan88.0

5Chicago Booth87.1

6UC Berkeley Haas86.7

7Columbia Business School86.5

8Northwestern Kellogg85.5

9Virginia Darden85.4

10Cornell S. C. Johnson82.8

11Yale SOM82.6

12Carnegie Mellon Tepper82.5

13NYU Stern80.8

14USC Marshall80.8

15Duke Fuqua80.7

16Washington Foster80.3

17UCLA Anderson80.1

18Michigan Ross78.3

19Dartmouth Tuck78.2

20Georgetown McDonough75.2

21Vanderbilt Owen74.8

22UT Austin McCombs74.7

23UNC Kenan-Flagler73.2

24Emory Goizueta72.7

25Brigham Young Marriott70.7

A Few Thoughts About the Bloomberg Businessweek Rankings
  • The top 10 in the overall Bloomberg Businessweek rankings is not much different from the top 10 U.S. News rankings. Yes, the order is a bit different. Ross and Tuck are included in USN’s top 10 and are not in BB’s. BB includes Darden and Johnson. However, we are not talking about significant differences.
  • Things get much murkier if one filters into the main components of the Businessweek rankings. So if you look at “Learning,” William and Mary is #1, Utah’s Eccles School is #2, and UT Dallas is #3. Stanford is #10 and Harvard is #53. That’s not a typo. But it still doesn’t make a lot of sense.
  • If you filter for “Networking,” the results are more plausible, but still hard to perceive as truly credible. So for example, Howard is #7, right after Chicago Booth, ahead of Northwestern Kellogg, UC Berkeley Haas, and 18 spots above Dartmouth Tuck, which has one of the most active alumni networks in the world.
There is some objective data (salary, GMAT score for example) in the Businessweek rankings. However, much of the ranking relies on surveys, which can be gamed. It’s also very hard to compare subjective elements like “Networking” or even “Learning” especially given that most responding, specifically the students and alumni, have really only experienced one program. Finally, students and alumni know that their responses to these surveys influence the value of their degree. They have an incentive to rate their schools highly.

Critically examining these rankings as a measure of quality, it’s hard to view them as credible both because the component rankings are head-scratchers and because they rely so heavily on surveys of people who have a vested interest in ranking their school well.

So where is there value in the Bloomberg Businessweek rankings? In the data that BB provides about the individual programs, specifically average salary in different industries and the ability to filter that data for geography, industry, and your GMAT score.

Do you need help making sense of the rankings and determining which b-schools are the best programs for YOU? Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you choose your target business schools, build a personalized admissions strategy, and apply successfully to acceptance! Learn more about our services here.

Image

Image

 

Related Resources:

MBA Admissions A-Z, a free guide

• Business School Selectivity Index [Can I Get Into My Dream School?]

U.S. News Best MBA Rankings by Business School 2019

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Bloomberg Businessweek Announces Best U.S. Business Schools appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
November Sale Going on Now!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: November Sale Going on Now!
Image
Image

With deadlines looming, it’s natural to feel some pressure, but don’t let the stress overwhelm you. Instead, refocus and make sure your application reflects your very best work, with help from one of our admissions experts!

We’re currently offering a special discount on non-rush purchases placed through November 20. With the discount code SAVENOW, you’ll save $500 on $5000, $200 on $2000, or $100 on $1000.

Work one-on-one with an admissions expert on any part of your application – from strategy, to essay review, to interview prep. Apply with confidence, knowing that you have submitted the best application possible.

Image

Don’t miss out – save hundreds of dollars with our November special!

Image

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post November Sale Going on Now! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
What Is the Diversity Essay Question & How Do You Answer It?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Nov 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What Is the Diversity Essay Question & How Do You Answer It?
Image
Image

What is the diversity question in a school application, and more importantly, why does it matter when applying to leading programs and universities?

Many applications now include a question – sometimes optional – that encourages applicants with minority backgrounds, unusual education, distinctive experience, or unique family histories to write about how these elements will contribute to the diversity of their target school’s class and community.

How to Show You are Diverse
If you are an immigrant to the U.S., the child of immigrants, or someone whose ethnicity is a minority in the U.S., you may find your response to this question to be helpful to your application effort.. Why? Because you can use it to show how your background will add to the mix of perspectives at the program you are applying to.

Download this sample personal background essay, and see how one student won over the adcom and got accepted into their top-choice MBA program.

Image

Of course, if you’re not a minority and don’t fall into one of those categories, that doesn’t mean that you don’t have anything to write about.

If you are applying to a school and have an unusual or special experience to share, like serving in the military, becoming part of a dance troupe, or caring for a disabled relative, use your experience to convey how you will bring diversity to the school’s campus.

You could be the first member of your family to apply to college or the first to learn English in your household; you could have worked your way through college or raised your siblings.

As you can see, diversity is not limited to one’s religion, ethnicity, culture, language, or sexual orientation. It’s whatever element of your identity distinguishes you from others.

Image

Why Does Diversity Matter at School?
Admissions officers believe diversity in the classroom improves the educational experience of all students.

The more diverse perspectives found in the classroom, throughout the dorms, in the dining halls, and mixed into study groups, the richer the discussions will be and the more creative the teams will become.

Plus, learning and growing in this multicultural environment will prepare students for working in our increasingly multicultural and global world.

In medicine, for example, a heterogeneous workforce benefits people from previously underrepresented cultures in medicine. Businesses realize they will market more effectively if they can speak to different audiences and markets. Schools simply want to prepare graduates for the 21st-century job market.

Listen to our podcast and find out how to approach diversity in your application.

6 Different Ways to Show Your Diversity
Adcoms want to know about your diversity elements and the way they have helped you develop particular character and personality traits, as well as the unusual experiences that have shaped you.

Here are six examples you could write about:

  • You grew up with a strong insistence on respecting elders, attending family events, or learning your parents’ native language and culture.
  • You are close to grandparents and extended family who have taught you how teamwork can help everyone thrive.
    Image

  • You have had to face difficulties that stem from your parents’ values being in conflict with yours or those of your peers.
  • Teachers have not always understood the elements of your culture or outside-of-school situation and how they influence your performance.
  • You suffered from discrimination and succeeded s in spite of the discrimination, because of your values and character.
  • You learned skills from a lifestyle that is outside the norm – living in foreign countries as the child of diplomats or contractors; performing professionally in theater, dance, music, or sports; or communicating with a deaf sibling.
And remember, it’s not just about who your parents are. It’s about who you are – at the core.

Your background, your influences, your religious observances, your language, your ideas, your work environment, your community experiences – all of these factors come together to create a unique individual, an individual who can contribute to a diverse class and a diverse world.

How to Write About Your Diversity
Your answer to the diversity question should focus on how your experiences have built your empathy for others, your resilience, your character, and your perspective.

Whether the school asks you how you think of diversity or how you can bring or add to the diversity of your school, chosen profession, or community, make sure you answer the specific question posed. Your response should highlight a distinctive you that will add to the class mosaic every adcom is trying to create. Adcoms want each student to add to the overall picture. You don’t want to blend in; you want to stand out but also complement the school’s canvas.

Here’s a simple, three-part framework that will help you think of diversity more… well diversely:

  • Identity: Who are you? What has contributed to your identity? How do you distinguish yourself? Your identity can include any of the following: gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, disability, religion, non-traditional work experience, non-traditional educational background, multi-cultural background, and family’s educational level.
  • Deeds: What have you done? What have you accomplished? This could include:
    a. Achievements inside and outside your field of study

    b. Leadership opportunities

    c. Community service

    d. Military experience

    e. Internship or professional experience

    f. Research opportunities

    g. Hobbies

    h. Travel

    Any or all of these could be unique. Also, what life-derailing, throw-you-for-a-loop challenges have you faced and overcome?

  • Ideas: How do you think? How do you approach things? What drives you? What influences you?
Learn more about this three-part framework in this blog post.

Think about each question and how you could apply your diversity elements to the classroom, your school, or your community. Any of these elements will serve as the framework for your essay.

But don’t worry if you can’t think of something totally “out there”! You don’t need to be a tight-rope walker living in the Andes or a Buddhist monk from Japan to pass the diversity test!

Image

And please remember, the examples I have listed are not exhaustive. There are many other ways to show diversity!

All you need in order to write successfully about how you will contribute to your school’s diverse population is to have lived on this planet — and then examine your identity, deeds, and ideas with an eye towards your own distinctiveness and individuality.

Want to ensure your application demonstrates the diversity that your dream school is seeking? Work with one of our admissions experts and download our FREE Diversity Checklist. This checklist includes 30+ different ways to think about diversity to jump-start your creative engines.

Image
By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsDifferent Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

What to Do if You Belong to an Overrepresented Applicant Group

Med School Admissions Advice for Nontraditional Applicants: The Experts Speak

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post What Is the Diversity Essay Question & How Do You Answer It? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Get Accepted to Columbia Business School [On-Demand Webinar]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Accepted to Columbia Business School [On-Demand Webinar]
Image
Image

If you missed Get Accepted to Columbia, don’t worry! It’s now available for on-demand viewing.

With Accepted’s founder Linda Abraham as your guide, you’ll learn what your CBS application needs to accomplish – and how to impress the adcom.

Linda will walk you through each element of the application, and give you tips that show you how you can demonstrate your “fit” with Columbia’s values while also standing out within a very crowded applicant pool.

Image

Image

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Get Accepted to Columbia Business School [On-Demand Webinar] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Everything You Need to Know About Preparing for Your MBA Interview  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Everything You Need to Know About Preparing for Your MBA Interview
Image
Image

Congratulations on receiving your MBA interview invite – you should feel great about making it this far in the admissions process! Just when you thought it was time to sit back and relax, it’s now time to tackle your next challenge: preparing for your interview.

There are four things you need to know when prepping for your MBA interview:

  • Yourself
  • Your interview goal
  • Your school
  • The type of interview
Once you understand each of these steps, you will have a much better idea of how to approach, prep, and then ace the MBA interview. Let’s jump right in!

STEP 1: Know yourself.
This interview is about you, so if you can’t answer some simple questions about who you are and what you want, then you’re in big trouble. Ask yourself, and make sure you can answer, the following questions:

You’ve probably addressed these topics in your essays, which means hopefully you’ve already given them some thought. Go back and read your essays, review your notes (if you still have them), and then think, think, and then think some more about who you are and why this school should value who you are.

What happens if you complete your introspection session successfully and end up with a billion impressive stories and qualities that you think are share-worthy? How do you narrow down your talking points to a reasonable five or six?

Dawna Clark, Former Director of Admissions at Tuck, offers the following advice in an old Businessweek article:

“I would recommend that [applicants] spend some time thinking about five of the top skills, experiences, or accomplishments that they most want to emphasize. I would literally write a list of everything that you’re proud of before your interview and then cut it in half, and cut it in half again and cut it in half again, until you say, ‘You know what? If I have limited time, here are the five points I’m really hoping to get across in this interview.’ With each of those five bullet points come up with some examples and substantiate them.”

STEP 2: Know your interview goal.
Your interview goal is three-fold: You need to show fit; demonstrate your communications and interpersonal skills; and inform the school about recent achievements. Let’s look more closely at each one.

  • Show fit. During your interview, your interviewer will be assessing your fit for the program. To demonstrate this fit, you’ll need to think about how your educational and professional background, as well as your post-MBA career goals, mesh with the school’s mission, strengths, methodology, and career opportunities. And remember, fit is not simply calculated as an algorithmic formula; you need to demonstrate how your personality and passions as an individual will be compatible with the program.
  • Demonstrate your communication skills. If you want to survive in the business world, you’re going to need to know how to convey your thoughts and ideas coherently. If you want to survive in business school, you’ll need that same skill. While proving you can talk the talk and carry on a friendly conversation is important for all applicants, it’s particularly important if English is not your first language or if your test scores/transcript indicate a less-than-stellar communication skills.
  • Inform the interviewer about recent achievements. For example, did you get a promotion at work? Earn an A in Micro Econ? Did you retake the GMAT? Immerse yourself in a new community service project? Take on a new leadership role? Updating your interviewer of these new developments will demonstrate your commitment to strengthening your profile and your ambitions to grow and learn as an individual.
STEP 3: Know the school.
You can’t very well demonstrate your fit with your target program if you don’t know what your target program stands for – what it values, what its strengths are, what teaching method it uses, etc.

Regarding values: All programs are going to emphasize values like leadership, innovation, and teamwork, but some programs will emphasize certain values more than others, or in specific nuanced ways. So what you need to do is first understand those nuanced values and then explain how you share those same values.

Regarding teaching methods: You should prepare to explain how your learning style matches the program’s teaching style. To do this, you’ll need to understand how the program works. Are there learning teams? Cohorts? Lectures? Cases? Projects? The better you understand these methodological elements, the better you’ll be able to demonstrate how the program seems especially designed for you – for your educational needs, for your professional goals, and for your non-professional interests.

It’s during this step that you should think about how you will contribute to the school. Knowing what the school offers and what they are looking for will help you explore the ways in which you can contribute.

STEP 4: Know the type of interview.
Hopefully you’ll have access to this information – either from the school itself or from your fellow applicants who have already completed their interviews.

These are your options:

  • Blind: The interviewer has seen your resume, but nothing else. For these interviews, you can draw from material in your essays and other components of your MBA application since this will all be new information to the interviewer. Don’t feel limited to application-only stories, though; feel free to share new stories!
  • Informed: The interviewer has thoroughly gone through your file. You’ll need to think of skills, experiences, and achievements that you haven’t discussed in your application. You don’t want to bore them with info they already know. Also, be prepared to address weaknesses in your application. You may also be asked to elaborate or further explain stories in your application.
  • Case presentation: You’ll be asked to analyze a business case usually in a group setting. Your personal background and goals are not a part of this kind of interview. A personal interview may occur separately.
  • Team interviews: This is an interview consisting of you and other interviewees, designed as a conversation or discussion. See Tips for Team Interviews for more information and advice on this one.
Whatever the school, whatever the interview style – we can help! Check out our MBA Interview Services and work one-on-one with an admissions expert who will help you prep and ace your interview!

Image

Image

 

Related Resources:

• Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

• 5 Steps to Follow After You Receive Your MBA Interview Invite

The Morphing and Multiplying MBA Interview

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Everything You Need to Know About Preparing for Your MBA Interview appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Final Day of November Sale – Don’t Miss Out!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Final Day of November Sale – Don’t Miss Out!
Image
Image

Today, November 20, is the final day to benefit from the special discount that can save you up to $500 on any non-rush service.

With the discount code SAVENOW, you’ll save $500 on $5000, $200 on $2000, or $100 on $1000.

Work one-on-one with an admissions expert on any part of your application – from strategy, to essay review, to interview prep.

Apply with confidence, knowing you’ve submitted the best application possible.

Image

Image

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Final Day of November Sale – Don’t Miss Out! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Nov 2018, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders!
Image
Image

By following the advice in the previous post you can create goals that are clear, credible, and convincing, but they won’t necessarily be exciting. They won’t make the adcom reader think as she reads, “Wow, it would be great if he could do that!” And this latter reaction is really what the goals essay should aim for. As all my clients have probably heard me say, you want to make your reader your cheerleader.

To generate such a response, deliver “goals plus” – show how your goals developed from your experience, and describe your motivation and vision for your goals.

  • Experience means when, where, and how your goals developed.
  • Motivation is the pivot point when something gained traction with you. When did you become engaged and captivated in some way so that you wanted to pursue a given path?
  • Vision is the broader impact of achieving the goal, beyond your own immediate efforts.
These three elements are separate words but in actuality will likely be intertwined. Here is a brief example, taken from a sample goals essay:

Last year, when I was in Taiwan advising a global financial services company on consolidating its Asia strategy, I found myself thinking what a shame it was that my relationship with the client proved responsive rather than proactive. With my knowledge of the region’s changing demographic and logistical realities, I could have recommended strategic opportunities a year ago to prevent the client from getting bogged down in redundant acquisitions and incompatible markets. Following that experience, I envisioned a new consulting paradigm resembling primary care medicine, based on a long-term, prevention-focused relationship between the consultant and client.

Adding experience, motivation, and vision turns the goals from static to dynamic. There are three other advantages of “goals plus”:

  • The experiential basis enhances credibility.
  • They create a story, which is more engaging and memorable than pure exposition.
  • Your goals inherently differentiate you; because it’s your story, it’s naturally unique.
Do you need help identifying, defining, and writing about your goals? Work one-on-one with an expert admissions advisor who will help you clarify your goals and present them to the adcom so you get ACCEPTED. Learn more about MBA Admissions Services here.

“Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders!” is excerpted from the Accepted guide, Why MBA? Click here to download the complete guide.

Image

Image
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips, a free guide

4 Things To Do If You Can’t Define Your MBA Goals

How to Clarify Your Goals for Your MBA – And Beyond

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Chicago Booth MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2018, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020]
Image
Image

Here’s a look at the Class of 2020, taken from the Chicago Booth website.

  • Class size: 591
  • Average GPA: 3.6
  • GPA range: 2.7-4.0
  • Average GMAT: 731
  • GMAT range: 610 – 790
  • Percent of GRE test-takers in class: 7%
  • Average student age: 28
  • Countries represented: 52
  • U.S. minority students: 31%
  • International students: 30%
  • Female students: 42%
  • Average work experience: 5 years
<<Check out our webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth!>>

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors

  Major
 Percent

  Economics
  25%

  Business
  24%

  Engineering
  24%

  Liberal Arts
  15%

  Physical Sciences
  7%

  Other
  4%

  Law
  1%

Breakdown of Industries Represented

  Industry
Percent

  Consulting
  24%

  Financial Services
  21%

  Other
  10%

  Non-profit/Government
  9%

  Technology
  9%

  Private Equity/Venture Capital
  8%

  Healthcare
  6%

  Consumer Products
  4%

  Energy
  3%

  Arts/Media/Entertainment
  2%

  Accounting
  2%

  Manufacturing
  2%

Breakdown of Geographic Representation

  Area
Percent

  United States
  70.1%

  Asia
  13.4%

  Central/South America & Mexico
  10%

  Western Europe
  2.5%

  Eastern Europe
  1.4%

  Canada
  1%

  Middle East
  1%

  Other
  0.3%

  Africa
  0.2%

Would you like to be part of Chicago Booth’s Class of 2021? Check out our webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth, learn the critical steps you need to take to get noticed by the adcom…and get ACCEPTED!

For personalized consulting services, check out Accepted’s comprehensive MBA admissions services.

Image

Image

 

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs, a guide to selecting the right one

• Chicago Booth 2018-19 MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

The Chicago Booth Approach – and You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Chicago Booth MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines
Image
Image

For its essay questions, the UCLA EMBA adcom is bucking the “less is more” trend in terms of length. The two main essays are both a hefty 750 words, long enough to allow – indeed to require – in-depth exposition, reflection, analysis, and description. These two questions together cover past, present, and future, in that order. Essay 1 addresses the past by asking for a particular story, and essay 2 addresses the present and future by asking about why now is the right time for you to be pursuing this degree. The questions indicate that the adcom believes the personal informs the professional; who you are defines your career and your work. Consequently, who you are as a person matters.

It helps to see these essays as two phases of a continuum:

  • In essay 1, portray qualities, skills, and experience(s) that support your goals.
  • In essay 2 show that your future plans fulfill the mission and purpose of the character portrayed in essay 1.
UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essays:
UCLA EMBA Essay #1
Legendary UCLA basketball Coach John Wooden once said that one’s leadership is derived from one’s character. Please provide an example of a time when your own leadership was at its best. (750 words max)

There are two key words in this question: leadership and character. The implication in the latter word is that UCLA seeks applicants who not only have the requisite track record of leadership and impact that is commonly sought by top EMBA programs, but also gravitas, depth as a human being. Your chosen example should include leadership/impact and gravitas/depth.

You can select a topic for this essay either from your work experience or outside it – but keep the phrase “at its best” on your radar. What does “your leadership at its best” mean to you? This point reflects your character. For most people, I suggest going with a professional example in order to give the adcom a glimpse of you in your work environment, handling important and high-stakes situations. Go with a non-work example if it has some specific strategic value for your application. Also, use a relatively recent experience if possible, to allow the adcom to see the person who will show up in the classroom.

Let the story itself carry most of the weight in the essay – depict not just the story of leadership but how you inspired others to follow due to your character, example, and leadership style. At the end of the essay, write a short concluding paragraph explicitly summarizing why this is you as a leader at your best.

UCLA EMBA Essay #2
Why is this the best time for you to pursue your MBA? (750 words max)

This is a unique take on a goals essay – 750 words essentially zooming in on “why now?” In many goals essays, you’ll cover this point in one sentence. Here, given the length, present “why now” in both a micro and macro view.

The micro view looks at the particulars of your current situation – your current responsibilities and challenges and likely immediate next step. This part should position you at the right experience, responsibility, and decision-making level for a competitive EMBA, and the next step should be a role for which the EMBA learning is either essential or at least a clear asset.

The macro view looks at the longer-term career vision and the continuum of your career from past to future. Within that continuum, why is now the pivot point where you should make the investment of time, effort, and (most likely) money? How will the Executive MBA propel you forward not just for the next step but for the long term?

In describing your goals, indicate why you are planning that step. For shorter-term goals, detail specific positions, company, scope of responsibilities, and desired impact (i.e. what your desired “footprint” would be). Longer-term goals need less detail, but they should present a clear direction, building on the earlier roles.

The question does not ask you why you are choosing UCLA’s EMBA, but you can add a brief discussion of this point. If you do, be specific: describe how the program meets your key learning needs; refer to the features of the program that are most important to you.

UCLA EMBA Essay #3 (For reapplicants)
Please describe your career progress since you last applied and how you have strengthened your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals. (750 words max)

As a reapplicant, you should show growth from the previous application. Discuss professional developments such as promotions, awards, and new projects, as well as any significant community involvements and/or educational endeavors. Describe the activity/experience and note its positive impact if any. Try to include an anecdote for at least 1-2 of the activities discussed – given the word allowance, you have room for some detail. Finally, be selective and present only those activities that are relevant and enhance your application and candidacy in some way.

In the goals update, if the goals are still the same, mention developments that further prepare you for those goals (skills/knowledge gained, broadened network, etc.). If you have refined or revised your goals in some way, explain why and make a strong case for why you now are pursuing this altered path.

For expert guidance with your UCLA Anderson Executive MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to UCLA’s EMBA program and look forward to helping you too!

UCLA Anderson’s EMBA Application Deadlines for January 2019 Intake

Application Deadline

Round 1
December 1, 2018

Round 2
February 1, 2019

Round 3
March 1, 2019

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Image

Image
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

• 5 Key Qualifying Factors the EMBA Adcoms Look For

• Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Applying to Regular Full-Time MBA Programs as an Older Applicant  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Applying to Regular Full-Time MBA Programs as an Older Applicant
Image
Image

“An MBA? Why aren’t you going for an EMBA?” You’ve probably heard this from friends and acquaintances when they learn that you are planning to pursue full-time graduate business studies, even though you are several years older than the average MBA applicant. This may also be the response of MBA admissions committees – unless you make a convincing case for pursuing a regular MBA at this point in your life and career. You may have very good reasons for seeking an MBA and not an EMBA. But the adcoms won’t know that unless you explain it persuasively in your application essays. Instead, they may make negative assumptions, such as “unfocused,” or even worse, “too set in your ways,” and “too difficult to place.”

What exactly is an “older applicant”?
Generally, an older applicant is someone who is about 5+ years older than the average age for a given school; another way to view it is 1+ years older than the upper age of the middle 80% age range. For example, Columbia’s 2018 average age is 28 and the middle 80% range is 25-31, so if you’re 32 or older, you fall in the “older applicant” category for Columbia.

Within that generalization, however, there are nuances that beg attention – most notably, the reason for applying later. Back to our example, if you are applying to Columbia as a 32-year-old who wants to pursue a career in finance, the adcom may only view you as an older applicant in certain circumstances:

  • Adcom more likely to view you as an older applicant: You started in advertising after college, then shifted focus and entered an investment bank as a marketing and sales professional. Now you want to transition to a finance-specific role.
  • Adcom less likely to view you as an older applicant: You earned a Ph.D. in math after college, then joined a hedge fund in a quant product development role, and now want to help lead the business.
What’s the difference? The first example shows some (thoroughly understandable) zigzagging during the process of goal development, whereas the second example shows a direct, straightforward path. The second applicant above would not necessarily raise the concerns that a typical “older applicant” does (though, that comfort level would diminish with each year beyond 32, and would not pertain to a 40-year-old!). Examine your circumstances. Most older applicants fall into the “more likely” category above, but not all.

Addressing the “difficult to place” concern
MBA admissions committees are hugely concerned with the post-MBA employability of applicants and thus consider this factor seriously in their assessment. In a tight employment market, this concern is all the more urgent. They know that it will be harder to place you than someone with similar qualifications who is younger, because the younger applicant more closely fits the expectations of the recruiters.

There are two important steps you can take in your essays to counteract this possible negative factor.

  • Delineate concrete goals. Use practical terms to spell out your goals step by step, identifying position titles, companies or types of companies you might work for, and expected responsibilities and challenges.
  • Develop and describe a plan for obtaining employment post-graduation that does not rely exclusively on the school’s recruiting process. As an older applicant, it is especially important to demonstrate your resourcefulness and awareness of the placement challenge. Older career-changers are in particularly hot water unless they show that their network and resources can get them a job in their new field. Your plan should include a description of your marketability and “positioning,” contacts you may have in the field, and action items. Not only will such a plan overcome the “place-ability” concern, but it also will strengthen your competitive advantage overall.
Addressing the “lack of focus” concern
Say, like many (probably most) people, you went through some trial and error after college to discover your best professional fit. That process, while landing you in the “older applicant” category, gives you some assets as well:

  • Insight into your strengths, weaknesses, and interests based on mature self-reflection
  • Relative breadth of experience
  • An interesting “story” to tell about the development of your goals
Use these assets to counteract the notion that your road to your goals evidences lack of focus. In doing so, you can simultaneously tackle a critical issue – why you need a full-time MBA now. Integrate the following two aims in your essays with the following tactics:

  • It is imperative to present a positive reason for pursuing a full-time MBA now.
    Thus, reasons such as “reaching a plateau” and “desiring a change” will not suffice – they will only enhance the “unfocused” image. Explain why this is the right moment to devote two years to an MBA – it should be linked to your next career step.

    Next, identify several skills or aspects of knowledge that you will need to succeed in those goals, that you do not presently possess, and that the MBA program in question will provide.

    Then connect those dots in the “why MBA/why this program” part of the essay. Taking this approach will enable you to follow up your concrete goals with a compelling rationale for earning an MBA now.

  • In more or less detail, for conventional goals essay questions, link your career experience to your goals.
    Your challenge is twofold: (a) discuss a career that is longer than average while leaving space in the essay for other important information; (b) make your current goals seem an inevitable, logical outcome of your experience.

    The key is to be selective in what you discuss. Do not just condense your experience. Review your goals, and then determine which aspects of your experience are most relevant to them.

    Take the “more likely” applicant above. In discussing their early marketing experience, this applicant would focus less on creating ad campaigns and more on analyzing market needs, noting that they discovered a previously unrecognized talent for and enjoyment in analytic work. After establishing this logical basis for their goals, they add that their marketing experience will give them a deeper qualitative understanding of real companies’ operations – turning a possible negative into a positive.

Addressing the “set in your ways” concern
While you must show focus and direction in your goals, some schools have voiced concern that older applicants are more set in their ways and thus less interested in or able to absorb the “transformational experience” that their program provides. Using your essays to demonstrate an innovative streak and openness to new ideas is the ideal way to counteract this possible objection. You might tie these qualities in to your goals, your non-work activities, and/or your reason for pursuing a full-time MBA.

Special contribution as an older applicant
Being an older applicant may give you an edge in how and what you will contribute as a classmate, in one way in particular: older applicants tend to have experience across industries and functions, which creates a multi-dimensional, dynamic perspective. Basically, it is the “1+1=3” idea. If you have worked in both the hierarchical finance industry and the flatter, agile high-tech manufacturing industry, for example, you know the two industries. But you also have a comparative view of how different functions and positions work in two vastly contrasting environments, and the effects of those environments – which environment encourages and discourages which types of achievement, which produces what problems, and so forth. Experience in varied functions has a similar benefit. If you believe you bring this type of value, in your essays don’t just state that fact, but portray it through specific examples.

Finally, consider your older-applicant status when making your list of schools. Some programs, such as Kellogg and Wharton, will be more receptive to a thirty-year-old applicant than will others.

Bottom Line
Your status as an older-than-average MBA applicant is an obstacle that you can turn into an asset if you formulate an effective essay strategy. After the adcom reads your application, they will wish that all applicants had such a fascinating developmental process, such compelling and well-articulated goals, and so much to contribute to their classmates!

Are you looking for the guidance and support of an experienced consultant as you devise your strategy to apply as an older applicant? Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services to learn how we can help you gain acceptance to the MBA program of your choice despite – or even, in spite of – your age!

Image

Image
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Focus on Fit, a podcast episode

4 Tips for Proving You’re an “Easy to Place” Older Applicant

• Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Applying to Regular Full-Time MBA Programs as an Older Applicant appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
MBA, Private Equity, Cop: Meet Nik Kumar, Columbia MBA 2019  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA, Private Equity, Cop: Meet Nik Kumar, Columbia MBA 2019
Image
Image

Interview with Nik Kumar, Columbia MBA Class of 2019 [Show Summary]
Want to know what it’s like to be a Columbia MBA? How about what it’s like to be a police officer? Nik Kumar (CBS ’19) can answer those questions, and in this episode he shares the ins and outs of both. Listen in for the scoop!

A Current Student’s Perspective on Columbia Business School [Show Notes]
Our guest today, Nik Kumar, earned his bachelor’s degree from Cornell in Industrial Labor Relations and Economics. He joined Bank of America/Merrill Lynch as an analyst in 2010, moved into PE in 2012, and became a CBS MBA student in January 2018. While working on Wall Street, he also served as a volunteer auxiliary police officer for the NYPD.

Can you tell us about your background? Where you grew up? What you like to do for fun? [1:45]
I grew up in the Dallas area, and by the time senior year of high school rolled around I really wanted to get away from Texas, so I went to Cornell and had a wonderful time there, enjoying the experience and being away from a big city. Many people I met there are still great friends to this day. When I graduated the allure of Wall Street was too much to pass up so I joined the investment banking program at Bank of America/Merrill Lynch as an analyst in their leveraged finance group. I then had the unique opportunity to join a smaller firm, Sound Harbor, focused on distressed debt, and then went to another larger firm, AEA Investors, where I was for 2.5 years before starting at Columbia.

How did you get interested in becoming a volunteer police officer? [3:08]
In looking back it started kind of with 9/11. As I grew older and saw the terrorist incidents I hated being unable to do anything about them. I thought about joining the military, going to West Point, but quickly learned I might not be the best fit to lead a platoon in Afghanistan or Iraq. I decided to pursue a more regular career path, but always had the desire to do some sort of service. When I found out about the NYPD program I knew I wanted to be a part of it. It is essentially a reserve police unit that operates during big events, like parades, visiting dignitaries, etc. It is a 12 hours/month commitment. Training is over 16 weeks, once a week at the police academy and includes training in self-defense, penal law, reacting to terrorist incidents, and military style training, so very different from anything I had ever done previously. People in my class were from very different backgrounds – students, mechanics, city workers – and it was an amazing way to meet people I wouldn’t otherwise have the chance to. We did not have guns, and our responsibility was mainly to observe and report, crowd control, etc.

What experience as a police officer stands out for you? [6:28]
New Year’s Eve always stood out. I did that for four years in Times Square. With so many people in such a tight area, my responsibility was to be on the lookout for anyone acting suspiciously and also crowd control – that people are safe, crowds don’t spill over barricades and stampede. It was our job to make sure it didn’t happen.

You have an undergrad degree in business and extensive experience in investment banking and private equity. Other than the credential, why do you need an MBA? Are you actually learning much from your studies? [9:47]
The decision to go back wasn’t easy. I spent a lot of time thinking about it. I spent a lot of time doing research, visiting schools in the Northeast, and talking to students. I also talked to a lot of people senior to me. The perspective I got was that you get out of it what you put into it. It is a major investment in time and money, but I went back because I knew I wanted to be an investor long term and I had only done one form of investing. I had also never taken marketing or operations or personal leadership, and so far it’s completely changed the way I think about investing and companies. If I were to go back to the exact job I was doing before school, I would do it differently now – I would look at opportunities differently, and ask different questions. Another thing that Columbia does particularly well is integrating the real world into the experience, with some of the top minds in the investing world – hedge fund guys and those from other asset classes coming to speak. Having the opportunity to get inside their minds is amazing, and a very unique opportunity to ask them questions and learn how they think.

An example of how my perspective has changed is I came in with very technical training. With no marketing experience, I was never able to recognize when a company’s marketing department was overburdened, or whether their marketing strategy was effective. I now know what to ask and what to look for. It enables me to have a 360 degree view as opposed to one-dimensional view.

What did you find most difficult in the MBA application process? [15:41]
Choosing whether or not to go was the biggest challenge in terms of whether to even apply. In terms of the application itself a lot of my thinking and reflection had to come through in the essays to make a successful argument as to why I needed an MBA. That took a lot of self-reflection, hashing out my reasons and how things would be different with an MBA vs without one. Every school is different, and some of the material you might be able to use for other schools as well, but really look at the school you want to go to and be thoughtful as you answer the essay questions.

What do you like best about Columbia’s MBA program? [17:45]
They really use New York to their advantage and integrating guest speakers into the curriculum is really phenomenal. For example, I don’t know if I want to go into venture capital, but in my class they’ve brought in some top practitioners so I have learned so much. Second is my classmates. The school has comprised a class with very diverse backgrounds, from all over the world, from non-profits, the military, all sectors of business, and I have learned so much from my classmates.

What can be improved at CBS? [19:12]
I think the one thing that everybody mentions is the facilities that are out of date. It is a well-known problem, and they are building a new campus, but that won’t be done for a few years. Over the summer they did a nice job of renovating some of the classrooms. They have also built out some space for MBA students to meet, but it is space-constrained and I’m hoping that the new campus will help.

Tell me about the community feel at Columbia? [20:55]
I think the school does a really nice job of fostering a community environment. We have CBS Socials with the school coming together every Thursday or Friday and integrating with other members. The school organizes each class into clusters (sections) and within that you have your learning team (5-6 students). Members of your cluster tend to be your closest friends, and you take all core classes with them. There are so many opportunities to meet other students, like after school events with presentations, alums, and through those I have met so many students from other clusters and other years. Just two days ago we had the CBS Supper Club, where someone hosts a dinner for eight other students. Names are drawn out of a hat, and you don’t know them beforehand, but you get together at one person’s apartment for dinner and it’s a really nice way to meet other students.

What did you do during your summer internship? [22:51]
I actually started in January so I didn’t do the traditional summer internship. I am doing the J term , which starts in January and finishes in May 2019, which means I did my second semester during the summer. Since I am not looking for a career change I didn’t need the internship. However I did decide to do a part-time internship this fall and am currently working at a private equity firm that does business services and software investments since I wanted exposure to those industries. It’s a great way to take advantage of being in the city, and is almost like being in another class.

What are your plans for the future? [26:13]
I want to go back into the private investment world with a different perspective and more solid tool kit. I may be looking to focus on security and defense as those things are clearly a passion. I don’t plan to rejoin the NYPD in the future, and now am looking to make longer term impact by investing in firms that fight terrorism, focus on cybersecurity, etc.

Any tips for MBA applicants? [27:07]
The most valuable thing I did was visit campus and speak to students. If you have the opportunity to visit campus, do it, because it really helps determine whether you want to apply and if you can see yourself at that school. It also helps with your essays in justifying why you are interested in the school.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [28:25]
I would just emphasize that even people with traditional backgrounds can get value from an MBA. Some people from banking or consulting, for example, might write it off because they already have a business background and think they might not get as much out of it. For me, I’m going to go back with a completely changed perspective, and it has been a really worthwhile experience.

Image

Related Links:

Get Accepted to Columbia Business School, an on-demand webinar

Ask Me Anything: A Discussion with Columbia MBA Admissions Director Emily French Thomas, a recording

• Columbia Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Accepted’s MBA Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School

• Meet Dr. Akshat Kumar, Wharton MBA ‘19

Subscribe:

   Image
     Image

Podcast Feed

Image

Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post MBA, Private Equity, Cop: Meet Nik Kumar, Columbia MBA 2019 [Episode 287] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
How to Edit Your MBA Goals Essay  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Edit Your MBA Goals Essay
Image
Image

Short- and long-term goals
Before you start drafting your MBA goals essays, work out three levels of goals: short-term, intermediate, and long-term. It helps to have this whole picture in your mind regardless of where you’ll “zoom in” for a particular essay. Short-term applies to the timeframe immediately post-MBA to about two years later; intermediate covers the time about two to five years post-MBA; and long-term applies to the time following that. Usually essays ask for short- and long-term goals, but you’ll need to know your intermediate goals as well to bridge the short and long term.

Short-term goals are the most specific, for obvious reasons – they’re closer in time and they’re also the direct link to the MBA program. As you describe successive steps, use less and less detail in each, because the further out you project, the less certain things are. Don’t go beyond what’s practical, e.g., describing in detail what you’ll be doing in twenty years. Adapt each phase to reality too. If your targeted industry (say, healthcare) is in great flux, that point should be reflected in your goals.

Image

Responding to specific goals questions
Different sets of essay questions will emphasize different aspects of the goals; they’ll require different lengths and have different tones. Some are open, while others are focused and directed. The key is to “read” not just the words but the tone of the question. Anecdotally, I’ve noticed a trend toward short, focused goals essay questions; there are fewer 1,000-word goals essays, fewer essays asking for your “vision.” Most want the facts, straight.

Read the question carefully, and emphasize in your essay what the question emphasizes (e.g., is there an equal focus on short-term and long-term or on just one or the other, or do they just mention post-MBA goal without specifying which?). In other words, be guided by the question. That doesn’t mean you can’t bring in other elements, but they should support your main points.

Often the question asks why you want an MBA or want to attend the particular program. Link these points directly to your goals. If you can weave in your school visit and/or interactions with students and alumni, great!

Do you need help identifying, defining, and writing about your goals? Work one-on-one with an expert admissions advisor who will help you clarify your goals and present them to the adcom so you get ACCEPTED. Learn more about MBA Admissions Services here.

“Why Write A Blog Post Series on Goals?” is excerpted from the Accepted guide, Why MBA? Click here to download the complete guide.

Image

Image
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs, a free guide to selecting the right one for you

How to Clarify Your Goals for Your MBA – And Beyond

• 6 Tips for Creating Your Compelling MBA Goals Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How to Edit Your MBA Goals Essay appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
Which Applicants Get Accepted to Chicago Booth?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Which Applicants Get Accepted to Chicago Booth?
Image
Image

This is part 2 in a series about the “Chicago Approach.” If you missed part 1,check it out here.

Introducing 4 Chicago Booth Students:
  • Qi: A female Chinese investment banker (who is also a fashion blogger).
    Goals: A leadership role in Chinese PE or VC focusing on consumer goods following a stint in private equity in the US.

  • Jay: An American male environmental engineer working for a wind-power startup.
    Goals: Join a similar, young clean-energy venture still in growth phase, leading its business development.

  • Sandeep: An Indian male working in global supply-chain and IT consulting.
    Goals: Strategy consulting, with focus on pharma manufacturing.

  • Marya: A Russian female high school assistant principal.
    Goals: Start up an Internet-based language-instruction venture.

As you can see, despite Booth’s reputation as a finance school, it seeks and admits people from a wide range of industries and sectors. From my perspective shaped by 20 years of experience, these four examples (to preserve confidentiality, these profiles are fictional composites of successful Booth applicants I have worked with, not actual clients) together represent the exciting and impressive scope of Booth students.

<<Register for our webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth!>>

They’re not all even quant geeks! So, what do they have in common?

  • They all demonstrated in their applications an affinity for intellectual exploration (aligning with Booth’s academic freedom, freedom to define one’s impacts, and intellectual culture – see preceding post). This affinity originates in their curiosity to learn the truth (or varied perceptions of the truth) and their enjoyment of the process of intellectual exploration itself. E.g., Jay discussed in his essay how his experience led him to feel dissatisfied with his and his company’s impact, which in turn prompted him to explore the current state of the clean energy sector, its main players, its technologies and markets, and the existing business models for wind and solar power. He concluded that he could have greatest impact in the future through leading business development.
  • They all conveyed their inclination and ability to work, play, grow, and contribute as part of a community (aligning with Booths’ focus on culture of community in all facets, from intellectual to social). E.g., while Sandeep was delivering efficiencies in global pharmaceutical supply chains, he learned that a plant in Romania was consistently encountering quality failures. Although product quality failure was not his responsibility, communicating that “we’re all in this together” he contacted the plant’s supply-chain manager and together they reviewed the plant’s supply process and discovered a sourcing inconsistency. He supported the supply-chain manager in alerting the senior managers, and together they talked confidentially with parties involved to learn as much as possible about the failure. His approach reflects the “community culture” of Booth and also the “freedom to take risks” it offers, for there were indeed risks. E.g., the risk of going beyond job parameters led Sandeep to be particularly mindful in his interactions with the supply-chain manager to apply social and emotional IQ so as not to step on toes or raise turf concerns.
  • All these successful applicants presented in their applications (essay, resume, interviews, etc.) positive outcomes they have achieved and constructive differences they have made that were the result of group effort. E.g., while leading a stream of due diligence for a prospective transaction, Qi discovered possible environmental lapses in the African subsidiary of an otherwise attractive company. She convened an informal group of people with relevant experience and knowledge to analyze and provide perspective on the situation and its ramifications for the prospective deal. While the group did not reach consensus on the actual risk, they did agree with her encapsulation of their contrasting findings, which she presented with her recommendation to pursue the deal and factor in cost for environmental remediation – and they agreed to be available should further questions arise. Qi in turn offered to give a “third eye” review of her colleague’s evaluation of the Chinese cleantech sector about which she knew a good deal. This story portrays Qi exercising her freedom to define her impact on the world and performing with a community-oriented mindset, both elements of Booth’s approach.
While I’ve emphasized certain elements of the Chicago approach in each of these stories, it’s clear that all these people (and Marya too!) reflect all these elements. Equally important, they have effectively presented that fact in their Booth applications. And given the outcome of those applications, the adcom clearly saw their fit with and understanding of the Chicago Booth MBA program.

Do you want to ensure that your application demonstrates your fit with Chicago Booth? Do you need help highlighting your strengths and proving that you truly encapsulate the Chicago approach? [b] I would be happy to work with you on your application and guide you to acceptance at Chicago Booth or any other of your top-choice MBA programs. Click here to get started[/b][b].[/b]

Image

Image
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

Chicago Booth MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020]

• Chicago Booth MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Which Applicants Get Accepted to Chicago Booth? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5164
Location: Los Angeles CA
3 Mistakes Successful MBA Applicants Don’t Make  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Dec 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Mistakes Successful MBA Applicants Don’t Make
Image
Image

You already know what you need TO DO. Now let’s take a look at three things you DON’T want to do if you want to get accepted to your top-choice MBA program.

Don’t make these mistakes when applying to b-school:

Mistake #1: Applying without a clear idea of what you want to do after you earn the degree.
Having clear career goals is a MUST for successful MBA applicants. You may think you can cover up this lack of direction in your application, but the adcom are trained to see who has focused goals and who does not. Business schools are looking for applicants who will both succeed as students and as businesspeople in the post-MBA career world. If you don’t show direction early on, then there’s a chance you’ll flounder through b-school and won’t smoothly transition back into the workforce. YOU won’t get the most out of your MBA experience, and nor will the school. It’s a lose-lose for everyone.

Instead, solidify (with some degree of flexibility) what you want to do post-degree so that you present yourself as a strong, focused candidate in your applications. Remember, you’ll personally benefit from this research and direction, in addition to it boosting your chances of admission.

Mistake #2: Writing what you think the admissions committee wants to know as opposed to what you want them to know.
You THINK that by writing what the adcom wants to hear, that your essay will be creative – ingenious even. But what ends up happening, is that everyone thinks the committee wants to hear the same thing and they end up writing something UN-original in order to fit those imagined specifications. Instead, look deep into yourself and think about what you truly would like to share with them – that’s the ONLY way that your final product will be authentically original, and the only way that you’ll really impress the adcom.

Mistake #3: Applying exclusively to schools based on the rankings and without any sense of your own competitiveness.
If all applicants made this mistake, then Harvard, Stanford, and other top five programs would be even more selective than they are and VERY few people would ever gain admission. Yes, HBS is good for some people, and Stanford is good for others, but they’re certainly not the best schools for everyone. If there’s no possible chance that you’ll get accepted to a top five, top ten, or top fifty program, then start your quest by crossing those off your list. Save yourself the heartbreak of rejection and the costs and setback of reapplication by choosing reasonable programs to apply to.

That being said, so long as you apply to at least one safety and a few on-pars that you’d be thrilled to attend, then it certainly can’t hurt to try for a few reasonable reaches.

Accepted’s expert advisors can help you check off your admissions to-do’s and ensure that your application is mistake-free (of these three blunders and others). Explore our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services to learn more about how we can help you get ACCEPTED.

Image

Image

 

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs, a free guide to selecting the right program for you

• The Ultimate Guide to Becoming a Competitive MBA Applicant, a free guide

B-School Selectivity Index: Discover the schools where you are competitive

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 3 Mistakes Successful MBA Applicants Don’t Make appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

GMAT Club Bot
3 Mistakes Successful MBA Applicants Don’t Make &nbs [#permalink] 02 Dec 2018, 09:01

Go to page   Previous    1  ...  71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82    Next  [ 1629 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Accepted MBA Updates

  new topic post reply Update application status  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.