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Will You Be at Columbia Next Year?  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Will You Be at Columbia Next Year?
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Dreaming of starting your MBA at the “very heart of business” in NYC – at Columbia Business School? Whether you’re focused on finance (like 37% of CBS grads) or interested in any of a truly dazzling array of strengths (Entrepreneurship! Luxury retail! Consulting!) – CBS is an exciting program in one of the world’s most dynamic cities.

Not coincidentally, as one of the top b-schools in the country, it’s also very selective. That can create stress for applicants like you: How can you prove to the adcom that you have what they’re looking for in a Columbia MBA student? How can you position yourself for a successful application season?

To give you the tools you need, we’ve created our must-attend webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia!

Drawing on decades of admissions expertise, Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, will share a strategic framework for application success. You’ll learn what CBS is looking for, how you can prove you’re a great fit, and how you can stand out in the oh-so-crowded applicant pool. And because we know you’re busy with work, application plans, and life, we’ve distilled all of this into just one hour.

The webinar is free, but registration is required. Reserve your spot today and mark your calendars for Wednesday, November 7th at 10am ET / 1pm PT and again at 5pm ET / 8pm ET.

Register Now:

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Will You Be at Columbia Next Year? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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What Questions Do You Have? [MBA Interview Questions Series]  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What Questions Do You Have? [MBA Interview Questions Series]
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This blog post is part of a series of articles analyzing some of the most popular MBA interview questions and how to best respond to them. In this post, we’ll address “What Questions Do You Have?

Reason for asking the question:
To make sure the candidate has all pertinent information necessary about the school, as well as to confirm that he or she has thoroughly researched the program and consequently has thoughtful questions.

How to prepare:
This will most likely be your last opportunity to ask questions of the program before you find out the admission decision, so make sure the questions count. Take enough time to consider this prior to your interview, since this is perhaps the only question you can be positive will be asked in the interview. Write your questions down if need be.

You do not want the questions to be procedural in nature, such as, “When will I find out about your decision?” Those types of questions can be asked at the very conclusion of the interview (if necessary), but well after your primary questions. Questions should be well thought out and perhaps give the interviewer pause before answering. After all, the interviewer has had YOU in the hot seat for the last thirty minutes with challenging questions, so you should have some in return!

The best questions are the ones that make the interviewer have to dig deep into his/her knowledge to answer, or better yet, might be ones the interviewer can’t answer then and there. In this case the interviewer will need to check into a question and get back in touch with you. YES! One final opportunity to have a connection with someone critical to your admission decision. Thoughtful questions could focus on “big picture” things like school strategy, trends or specifics related to particular coursework.

Important things to remember:
Even if you have memorized all the content on the school’s website, visited campus and already asked (and had answered) all the questions you think you could possibly ever have, you better not have a blank stare, or a simple, “None,” answer.

Additional things to consider:
As a general rule of thumb, plan on two-three questions (not of the procedural type).

Nervous about your upcoming interview(s)? We’d be delighted to help. Our MBA admissions consultants have a combined experience of 100+ years working either within an MBA admissions office or as a consultant. We know what it takes to be successful in your interviews, and we’d love to work with you to bring out your best self when interview day comes. Check out our interview services here, and contact us today!

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Jen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing. Want Jen to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews, a free guide

What to Expect at Your In-Person MBA Interview with an Adcom Member

• 4 Steps to Preparing for MBA Interviews

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What Questions Do You Have? [MBA Interview Questions Series] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Stanford MSx Application Application Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford MSx Application Application Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Both the relatively complex MSx application form and your resume will establish you as a leader in your organization (and possibly even your domain), and that’s essential to be a qualified MSx applicant. Hence, you don’t need to, and shouldn’t try to, prove your qualifications with these essays. In reviewing current and former MSx student profiles, one thing stands out: they’re vibrant. They shine. They have impact, not just because of solid career strategies and impressive results, though that’s part of it. They are propelled forward by qualities of character: passion, courage, energy, curiosity, commitment, rigor, vision, big thinking, heart. These essays are your opportunity to reveal your own special character and clarify how it will add to the mix. You’re already a substantial leader organizationally. To shape the future, you must have something to say, a point of view, a distinctive voice – so don’t hesitate to take a stand in these essays.

Stanford MSx Application Essays:
Our essay questions are meant to be straightforward, not trick questions. This is an opportunity for you to share reflections on your life and career and further describe your aspirations. (Your answers to the two essays questions combined may not exceed 1,200 words.)

Stanford MSx Essay #1
What matters most to you, and why?

To really hit a home run with this essay, you need to bare your soul, at least a bit; take a risk, be open and probing about some essential aspect of yourself. That doesn’t mean the topic must be about your personal life, though for many applicants it is. You could, for example, discuss a political belief that truly drives you, and if it’s that strong, it will reflect your deepest values and relate to your significant experiences. I do suggest using a topic that has some profound meaning to you and that will allow you to ground this essay in your experience. Ultimately, it’s your experience and how you “process” or synthesize it that will be a key part of this essay.

Sometimes my clients worry when facing this question that their most intuitive topic isn’t “unique” – to which I say, it will be by the time you’re done with the essay, if you delve deep into your experience and deliver your message via detailed anecdotes and frank reflection.

Don’t make this essay overly or overtly strategic; that ends up feeling superficial and manipulative given the topic. One straightforward approach is to structure the essay as a story, with reflection and insight at various pivotal points.

Last, don’t forgot to explicitly address “why” your chosen topic is what matters most to you. The explanation need not be long, and the “why” may already be obvious from the bulk of the essay. But do still address it.

Stanford MSx Essay #2
Why this program now? What are your personal and professional objectives, and how will the Stanford MSx Program help you achieve them?

I suggest starting with your professional objectives – include specific details about position, company, anticipated responsibilities, etc. Equally if not more important, however, is why you want to pursue this position/role: what motivates this projected career path, what impact you aim to have. This information will invigorate the essay and turn a competent essay into a compelling one. It ideally will get the adcom excited about being a part of your career journey.

Toward the end of this section, add a specific point or two about your personal objectives for attending this program – this part of the question also reflects the program’s emphasis on holistic growth, and your application should respond to that emphasis. Personal objectives need not be divorced from professional ones – often, development of a given trait or capability will benefit various aspects of one’s life.

Do be explicit about “why now” – it’s an especially important point for mid-career professionals pursuing a full-time program. If you are being sponsored, you can include aspects of that condition as context; if you are shifting career focus, your answer to why-now may be more complex, e.g. market conditions combined with career factors.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs. Also refer to the structure, culture, and special features of the program, detailing how they will support you and your goals.

Additional Information
If there is any information that is critical for us to know and is not captured elsewhere, include it in the “Additional Information” section of the application. Pertinent examples include:

  • Extenuating circumstances affecting academic or work performance
  • An explanation of why you do not have a letter of reference from your current direct supervisor
  • An explanation of any academic suspension or expulsion
  • Work experience that did not fit into the space provided
  • Academic experience (e.g., independent research) not noted elsewhere
The wording of this question indicates that you should use this optional essay to explain things that need explaining in some way – not to add additional points that you think will enhance the application. Indeed, the app form plus the essay questions provide ample opportunity to present your holistic candidacy, so adhere to the spirit as well as the phrasing of this question, and stick to necessary topics – if any.

For expert guidance with your Stanford MSx application, check out Accepted’s Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top schools and look forward to helping you too!

Stanford MSx Application Deadlines for 2018-19

Submission Deadline
Decision Notification

  Round 1
  September 18, 2018
  Early December 2018

  Round 2
  January 10, 2019
  Late March 2019

  Round 3
  March 13, 2019
  Mid April 2019

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Leadership in Admissions, free guide

• Stanford MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives, a podcast episode

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Stanford MSx Application Application Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Columbia Business School MBA Class of 2020 Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Columbia Business School MBA Class of 2020 Profile
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Here’s a look at CBS’s MBA entering 2018 class profile, taken from the Columbia Business School website:

  • Applications received: 6029
  • Admitted: 1028
  • Enrolled: 756, divided into 11 clusters
  • January entry class size: 204, divided into 3 clusters
  • August entry class size: 552, divided into 8 clusters
  • Average GMAT scores: 732
  • Range of GMAT scores: 530-790
  • Middle 80% of GMAT scores: 700-760
  • Average undergrad GPA: 3.6
  • Middle 80% of undergrad GPA: 3.2-3.9
  • Average work experience: 5 years
  • At least 1 year of work experience: 99%
  • Average age: 28
  • Middle 80% of Age Range: 25-31
  • Women: 39%
  • Minority of US origin: 33%
  • International citizens: 42%
Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

  FIELD
  PERCENT

  Business
  29%

  Economics
  19%

  Engineering
  17%

  Social Science
  15%

  Humanities
  8%

  Sciences
  7%

  Other
  3%

  Technology
  2%

Breakdown of Previous Industries:

  INDUSTRY
  PERCENT

  Financial Services
  25%

  Consulting
  23%

  Marketing / Media
  11%

  Technology
  8%

  Private Equity
  7%

  Other
  7%

  Nonprofit
  5%

  Real Estate
  4%

  Healthcare
  3%

  Military / Government
  3%

  Energy
  2%

  Manufacturing
  2%

Do you want to learn how to increase your chances of gaining acceptance to Columbia Business School? Register for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to CBS, airing live on Wednesday, November 7th, and learn how to GET ACCEPTED! For one-on-one guidance, check out our MBA Application Package.

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Related Resources:

Ask Me Anything: Columbia Business School Admissions Director Answers Applicant Questions

• Columbia Business School MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

The Applicants That Stand Out at Columbia Business School

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Columbia Business School MBA Class of 2020 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Welcome to the Accepted Family, Dr. Shirley Chan!  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Welcome to the Accepted Family, Dr. Shirley Chan!
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The team at Accepted is pleased to welcome Dr. Shirley Chan as a new consultant.

Dr. Chan has a Masters of Education and a Doctor of Education from the University of Southern California. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of California.

During her college years, Shirley worked as a High School Outreach Coordinator, organizing conferences to teach disadvantaged youth how to apply for college and get financial aid. This inspiring experience has led Dr. Chan to dedicate her career to advising college and grad students, as well as consulting for working professionals.

Advised USC MS, PhD Students and Was Associate Director of MBA Admissions USC Marshall
Shirley’s work as a Graduate Academic Advisor for the USC Computer Science Department included advising students on course selections that would help them qualify for different positions or PhD programs following graduation. She evaluated thousands of apps and interviewed thousands of potential students in her position as Senior Associate Director for the USC MBA Admissions Office. Dr. Chan also worked as a Career Advisor at the USC MBA Career Center, where she took pleasure in assisting MBA students in their career tracks, and then preparing them for job interviews. Her success stories include students who now work at Deloitte, EY, McKinney, Houlihan Lokey, Morgan Stanley, Mattel, Johnson & Johnson, and Amazon. Shirley coaches her students on what to think about while completing their grad school applications, and on their long-term career goals as well.

Undergrad and Grad Admissions Consultant for 5+ Years
Dr. Chan has worked as an undergrad and grad admissions consultant for over five years. Her success is seen in the schools her clients have been accepted to: Carnegie Mellon University, Columbia University, Cornell University, MIT, USC, all of University of California campuses, and New York University.

We’re thrilled to have Dr. Chan join our team!

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Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Welcome to the Accepted Family, Dr. Shirley Chan! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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3 Keys to Successful Interview Preparation  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Oct 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Keys to Successful Interview Preparation
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“3 Keys to Successful Interview Preparation” is excerpted from MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools, by Linda Abraham and Judy Gruen.

Throughout this book I’ve emphasized the importance of knowing your goals, knowing the schools where you apply, and knowing yourself. Finding where these points converge is essential for a successful MBA candidacy, including the interview process. For this reason, when you enter the interview phase, know three things and know them cold:

Know how you fit the program
You already have demonstrated your fit with the program substantially in your application, and yet you will be asked to cover that ground again in your interview. Review your notes from your initial school research to remind yourself of all the reasons this program stood out to you. Refresh your memory about how your own professional and educational background matches the school’s methodology, strengths and career opportunities. Review your essays again (yes, those too!) so when you have coffee with your interviewer, you have total recall about the programs and curriculum that drew you to the school in the first place. Interviewers are likely to ask questions that are meant to test your commitment to that school, such as: If you are accepted to this school as well as your other top choices, why would this MBA Program suit your professional needs best? Be prepared with an answer.

Sometimes applicants are caught short during interviews, especially when they are asked for more specifics about how they will contribute meaningfully to the program and cannot answer with any specifics. So if you’re applying to Chicago’s Booth School of Business and say that you look forward to joining Net Impact, a community service club, be prepared to mention whom you have spoken to in the club, and which of their current initiatives you find most appealing. Nobody can anticipate every question that an interviewer might ask, and it’s unrealistic to speak with an active member of every club you’re interested in at every program to which you apply. Still, a little contact can go a long way. Be prepared to mention at least one or two school clubs in ways that show you know what they’re about and that you’ve made contact with someone from the group.

Know yourself
The interview is about you, not only professionally, but personally. One Harvard applicant noted on her resume that she had a passion for singing, and was actually asked to sing during her interview. Be careful what you write about in your essays or list on your resume regarding personal interests, or your interviewer may ask you to sing, too!

Have a strategy for what you want most to reveal about yourself in a very limited amount of time. Especially in a blind interview, be prepared with a list of your five top skills, experiences, or accomplishments, and have examples ready to substantiate each of your top points. At Accepted, we’ve received feedback from hundreds of MBA applicants who reported on their interview experiences. Surprisingly, many report that questions they found the most difficult to answer were the ones they should have been prepared to answer even in their sleep. These include talking about a weakness in your profile, what your plans are immediately post-MBA, how you personally have contributed to your team and explaining a career change. These are all part of knowing yourself and knowing how the program fits into your professional goals and matches your personal style. Like the motto of the Boy Scouts, “be prepared.”

Know the school
Does the school you are interviewing for value innovation? Leadership? Teamwork? Challenging conventional thinking? Most top schools claim that they value all of these qualities, but some emphasize one more than another. Understand how the schools define the qualities they value, and be prepared to speak knowledgeably about how they try to put these qualities into practice and how you will too.

Get individualized interview coaching when you set up a mock interview with an MBA admission expert! Check out Accepted’s MBA interview assistance packages to get started.

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Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews, a free guide

The Morphing and Multiplying MBA Interview

5 Steps to Follow After You Receive Your MBA Interview Invite

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 3 Keys to Successful Interview Preparation appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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MBA Admissions Consultant
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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Writing About Your Experiences Abroad  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Oct 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Writing About Your Experiences Abroad
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You studied, worked, or volunteered abroad and now you want to include part of this in your personal statement. Maybe you want to show that you’ve experienced a different culture or that you’ve managed to go outside of your comfort zone. Maybe you’ve had interesting experiences – met people, climbed mountains, or lived without air-conditioning. Or maybe you had the opportunity to help people who genuinely needed it.

How to Make Your Experience Stand Out
But, at this point, you’ve also realized that many other applicants have had similar experiences. While the experience may have been transformative for you, requiring you to learn how to operate without your usual safety net in a foreign environment, you need to ensure that your study abroad experience serves a role in your essay as something other than window-dressing.

There’s an old Onion article which jokes that someone’s short work experience in Africa allowed her to post a better Facebook photo, and, without the proper analysis, descriptions of abroad experiences can feel the same way in an admissions essay. Often, I read essays with lush descriptions of exotic scenery and people who speak different languages, yet you the writer – the most important person – stays the same. Without showing admissions committees why a study abroad experience was transformative, these types of stories simply blend together and give the impression that you were there simply to add another notch to your resume.

Don’t Forget the Most Important Question: WHY?
Studying abroad can be a pivotal moment in your personal journey, but a personal statement needs to explain exactly why. If, indeed, gaining experience with other cultures was important to you at that stage, what exactly did you learn? It can’t be enough to just give a story about someone you met while traveling, you have to explain why that person changed you. An admissions committee member once told me that it mattered less what an applicant’s experience was, what mattered was how they talked about it. Even the most seemingly dull experience can be transformative to someone who is really paying attention.

Do you need help taking your experiences and using them to create a unique, compelling – even exciting – personal statement? Explore ourAdmissions Consulting & Editing Services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will guide you through the admissions process to acceptance.

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Jessica Pishko graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University. She spent two years guiding students through the medical school application process at Columbia’s Postbac Program and is a former Accepted admissions consultant. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

• How to Add Detail to Your Social Enterprise/Community Service Goals

5 Elements to Telling an Attention-Grabbing Story

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Writing About Your Experiences Abroad appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
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Wharton’s Executive MBA, Where East and West Meets and Mixes  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton’s Executive MBA, Where East and West Meets and Mixes
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Interview with Barbara Craft & Diane Sharp, Wharton Executive MBA Admissions Directors [Show Summary]
In today’s podcast we talk with Barbara Craft and Diane Sharp, Directors of Admission at Wharton’s Executive MBA programs in Philadelphia and San Francisco. They share information on the intricacies of the programs, how they relate to each other and to the full time MBA program, and how to stand out in the admissions process. Listen in!

Wharton’s Executive MBA, Where East and West Meet and Mix [Show Notes]
So what are Wharton’s Executive MBA options? Who is Wharton’s EMBA program for? And how do you as an applicant show the program is right for you? Today we speak with Barbara Craft and Diane Sharp, both Directors of Admissions at Wharton’s Executive MBA programs located in Philadelphia and San Francisco.

Can you share a bit about the history of the Wharton MBA Program for Executives with our audience? [1:44]
University of Pennsylvania has been around a very long time. It was founded in 1740 by Benjamin Franklin. Wharton is the oldest collegiate business school, founded in 1881. I mention this because we were also one of the first to have a format for working professionals – we’ve had it for 45 years – and now almost 20 years in San Francisco. We are the only Ivy League offering a [non-distance learning] MBA for executives on the west coast.

We are especially proud of the fact that our EMBA program is the same as our full-time MBA program. It’s the same number of credits, and same level of academic rigor. It is not MBA-lite by any means.

Who should choose an executive program vs. a full time program? [3:58]
There are a lot of good reasons for choosing either, but we find that professionals further along in their career choose the EMBA program. They are typically at the cusp of higher level management and prefer not to jump off their career track and lose trajectory. Sometimes it is a life-style issue as well, as they have families and moving for a couple years is not feasible. You also have to have the buy-in from your company.

Full-time students tend to be more junior and often are looking to make a career switch, so having the internship makes it easier to have a change.

The average age of matriculants in the EMBA program is 35-36, with 12-13 years of experience. We like to see at least eight years of work experience, and also some management experience.

What are the distinctive elements of Wharton’s Executive MBA program (as opposed to other EMBA programs)? [6:31]
We are one program, two locations, so we span the country. Either cohort starts the program together in Philly as one big group, then everyone goes back to their respective coast for the first year of core classes. Later on in the first year the east coast cohort comes west for a week-long marketing simulation class. We also offer four different locations for global business residency, so there is another opportunity for merging of east and west. Second year students can take electives on the east or west coast. We have the largest selection of electives of any business school in the world, so in no way are our students limited, they can absolutely specialize if they like. We draw from students that are all over the country, and we attract from other countries as well – on the west coast we have students currently from Singapore and Mexico, and on the east coast we have students from Copenhagen and Jamaica.

What are you looking for in Wharton Executive MBA candidates? [9:05]
We are offering the Wharton MBA. We have the same admissions requirements, and faculty have the same expectations, and therefore we are looking for the academic foundation to succeed, and the energy to maintain the same academic standards while working, having families, and other things. We look for people who have shown a history of always wanting to be challenged. We don’t have a set expectation of where you are coming from. Sometimes people are concerned they don’t see their function or industry represented in the data. Check us out – we love to see diversity in any way we can get it.

We want to know about your goals, but we also want you to come in with an open mind. Sometimes students come in and take a class and then head off in a different direction, but having some direction prior to coming in is important.

The GMAT is required, though we do accept the GRE as well, and we started piloting the Executive Assessment for applicants with 10 or more years of work experience. A standardized test is required of every applicant regardless of advanced degree. It is just one piece of the application, however. We look at it along with work experience, level of support, and academic rigor of the institution. If someone didn’t perform as well as they liked in undergrad it can be really helpful to see the current skill level.

What about sponsorship? Is it recommended? Required? Nice to have, but strictly optional? [13:28]
We require sponsorship, and it is required at the time of your application. We don’t admit and then ask for sponsorship. Sponsorship comes in many different forms, and we don’t have a template for a letter of sponsorship. The minimum level of sponsorship is that time is made available. Whoever has the authority to sign the letter – HR, division head, etc. – needs to say, “We know he or she is applying and we support the time off. We understand the need to be in Philadelphia or San Francisco two Fridays per month.” Financial sponsorship is not a requirement for the program, and could be anything from 0 to 100%. We are not seeing as much of the 100% as we used to in the current economy. Again, this is an agreement between you and the company. Fellows candidates (candidates with less than eight years of experience) require financial sponsorship. They do need at least 50% of the cost covered by company, because if the company is not investing in you and you are at the lower end of experience level, then the full-time program might be a better option.

Wharton EMBA has 4 essay question: a goals question, a question about giving and taking in the program, a question about managing the time demands of the EMBA, and an optional where Wharton invites applicants to “explain any extenuating circumstances” or “share other defining aspects of [their] life.” What’s the “why” behind each question? They’re quite different. [16:33]
Please know we put a lot of time and attention into the application, so really be thoughtful and hone in on whether you are ready for this as you prepare the application – the circumstances we are asking about, and do they have this under control. What we are really trying to understand from the essays is “What kind of person are you?” Is this person a good fit? Is it a good time to get an MBA? We encourage applicants to write and rewrite, be very reflective, and be themselves. We want to know the true applicant, not answers they think we want to hear. We do have an optional essay to explain something if an applicant feels something may not be coming across in the rest of the application. Going back to undergrad performance, people might use that to explain a circumstance that had an impact on their performance. If you don’t take the optional essay to explain it, we’ll end up using our own imagination, which you don’t want.

Each essay comes from a different angle. The first one, what are your goals – we want to make sure you have some idea of what you want to do, and that what you want is what we offer. The second essay is one we tend to change from time to time, and we hope reflects your uniqueness. We are looking for people who are self-aware, thinking about things in a unique way, and also the voice they will have and bring into the program. The third essay forces you to think about time management. Not surprisingly people often write they juggle things and are always busy, but they don’t necessarily always talk about buy-in from their boss, or their family if they have one. We don’t expect flow charts, but we want to make sure you have thought about the stress of adding school to everything already in your life.

What are your admission deadlines and when does the program start? [23:33]
We admit one class per year that starts the end of May. The first deadline is December 5 and the second is February 6. There is no particular weight put on one deadline over another. Shoot for whichever deadline works for you, but I encourage people to aim for round one and then you have a buffer for the second deadline in case a recommendation letter is late, or other circumstances prevent you from completing before the first deadline. Otherwise you are looking at the following year. First and foremost, don’t compromise the quality of the application to reach the first deadline.

Would you tell me a bit about your students? Any stories that stand out in particular? [24:53]
Geographically our students come from many parts of the world. Even many of those based in the US are not US citizens originally, so classes are very diverse. We have quite a variety of industries represented – healthcare, biotech, physicians, veterinarians, public sector, military, etc. Also more than half have advanced degrees already.

One alum we like to mention is the CEO of Johnson & Johnson. He is a great alumnus, graduated in the 90s, and we see him a lot. On the other end of the spectrum are folks who start companies. In New York last week I saw someone who graduated four years ago and started a company having to do with online videos. It was bought by another company and was just bought again by ABC, so it’s an entrepreneur’s dream come true.

In San Francisco I was recently speaking with an alum in the program who was with Cesar’s and just took over as CMO of PetSmart, and he says he feels like he landed where he always should have been, and attributes a lot of that to the Wharton network.

Our students work with a fantastic career management team. It is almost like each student has an individual career coach, teaching you how to use the Wharton network, and figure out what you want to do. It continues after graduation, too. People really develop their personal brand. All students have access to all of our career services, including those who are sponsored. For the sponsored group they just can’t place their resume in the Wharton resume book or participate in on-campus recruiting unless they have express permission from their companies.

How much mixing if any takes place among Wharton MBA and Wharton EMBA students? Between SF and Philly EMBA students? [30:59]
With full-time students we have a cohort that does a semester in San Francisco in the fall and another in the spring. Just last weekend we had a mixer between executive and full-time students, when students finished class on a Friday. They don’t mix for academics except for the elective portion of the program when there is global modular programming in other places of the world – 3-7 day courses offered all over the place.

If someone lives in Kearney, Nebraska, which according to Travel Math is the “best city” and only city 45 miles away from the halfway point between Philadelphia and San Francisco, why should that person choose the Philadelphia program? The San Francisco program? Is there any reason someone would choose the east EMBA program vs. the west EMBA program or vice versa? [32:19]
We recruit in the center of the country together. We tell people to check both campuses out if they have the opportunity. There are a lot of reasons to pick one vs another. Perhaps someone in finance wants to be with more finance folks in Philadelphia. Another person who works in finance might want to get more of a perspective outside of finance, so choose San Francisco. Sometimes it is as straightforward as the schedule – whether it’s easier to catch a flight to Philly vs. San Francisco.

Whether you head east or west might also be determined by companies you work with, or you have family or friends in one area vs. another. A student currently in the San Francisco class is from New York, but opened a restaurant/brewery in San Francisco and is looking to eventually relocate to the Bay Area and wants to further build out his network here.

What are mistakes applicants make in their application to Wharton’s EMBA programs? [35:30]
Not engaging with us earlier in the process. We read all the apps together and oftentimes think, “If only we had known this person earlier we could have helped them remediate.” For example, maybe it’s a person who has a mixed undergrad and an ok GMAT. The competition is tough, and we could have given them advice to retake the GMAT if they’d contacted us, but now we don’t have the opportunity. We encourage people to have a 15 minute phone chat before applying so we can help them put together the best application and give advice on whether or not it is the right time to apply.

How do reapplicants do? [37:54]
We always give people a year and once they engage with us again we are happy to work with them. It is an open and interactive process. We want to make sure they understand what we are looking for in a candidate. I always ask what makes them a better candidate now. In some cases it should be a few years out – they need more managerial experience, for example. We do look at every reapplication as a new application, and just because they weren’t admitted the first time doesn’t mean they won’t be in the future. We don’t look on reapplicants negatively at all, and in fact it can be considered positive, as they are showing they really want Wharton and are willing to try again.

What do you see in your crystal ball for Wharton’s EMBA programs? [40:36]
We see what is reflected in the economy. When you see Wharton, you see the reflection of the global economy and the business world. Professors are so engaged that they are a part of it. Wharton will always first and foremost be doing the top research and with incredible depth and breadth. Students bring to the program what is happening in the real world. What we are teaching them hits the mark.

What parting words of advice for applicants to Wharton’s Executive MBA program? [43:46]
I want to re-emphasize the engagement factor. Chat with us, interview, don’t miss these opportunities. Really read the instructions on the website. When we interview someone, you get to spend the day with us. We want to see you on campus. You get to spend time one-on-one with a member of the admissions committee, you can sit in on class, and it is a really good thing. Do take advantage of it if you can! We encourage people to do this for any school they are considering. It is a large investment in time and money, and there are lots of programs out there. Visit campus, sit in on a class, talk with faculty, the admissions team, and experience as much as you can for any school considering.

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Related Links:

• Wharton EMBA’s Website

• Wharton EMBA Application Essay Tips and Deadlines

• Ace the EMBA, a free admissions guide

Accepted’s EMBA and MBA Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

• MIT Sloan EMBA and Sloan Fellows Programs

• Meet Dr. Nadia Afridi, Plastic Surgeon, Recent Columbia EMBA, and Mom

• Meet Dr. Akshat Kumar, Wharton MBA ‘19

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice

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The post Wharton’s Executive MBA, Where East and West Meet and Mix [Episode 283] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Would You Benefit From a Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion?  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Would You Benefit From a Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion?
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“Chance favors the prepared mind,” said Louis Pasteur, and I agree.

A successful Wharton Team-Based Interview is all about the team’s success and your contribution to the team. It’s not about strutting your stuff or dominating the conversation. It’s also not about being a wallflower or going with the flow.

You need to listen carefully and contribute constructively. The team’s success is paramount.

Most traditional interviews are the opposite. They focus on you, and you are supposed to engage in a dialogue that highlights your individual contributions and fit with the interviewing MBA program. There is no team. The TBD – or any group interview – is a new ballgame and one you need to train for – unless you want to leave the results to chance.

This is your opportunity to show the adcom what you’ll contribute to Wharton – an opportunity you truly don’t want to miss. Train and practice for it with Accepted’s Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion. Our Mock TBD is a prime-time rehearsal. Details and prices are here.

Don’t take our word for it, though. Here’s some of the feedback we’ve received from mock interview participants:

“I truly valued the opportunity to practice discussing the interview topic with other skilled and motivated candidates. I believe after participating in one of these groups, the candidates are much more prepared for the real interview.”

“This exercise gave me the opportunity to practice with students who actually have received the interview invite as well. It gave me a clear picture of how the discussion would flow and identify areas I need to focus on to improve my performance in the actual interview. Thank you!”

“The benefits of the Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion include: Trying out the experience of the group IV with other people invited to interview. Seeing my own weaknesses and other people’s strengths.”

Be ready. Be poised. Be confident.

Learn more about Accepted’s Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion here.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsPerfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

• 3 Tips for Your Team-Based Discussion

• Do I Really Need a Mock Admissions Interview?, a short video

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Would You Benefit From a Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Columbia Business School: Do You Have What it Takes?  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Columbia Business School: Do You Have What it Takes?
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An MBA is a serious investment in your future – it’s two years out of your career, sure, but it’s also training, a credential, and a network that you’ll have for the rest of your life. That’s why your application strategy is so important: choosing (and getting accepted to) the right school for your goals isn’t just admissions talk – it can determine whether your MBA experience is amazing or just so-so.

Applying successfully to a top MBA program like Columbia Business School takes organization, effort, smarts, and strategy. With Columbia’s rolling admissions schedule, it’s time to get serious about crafting and implementing that strategy.

To help you do just that, we’ve created our intensive one hour webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia. Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, will show you how to approach the CBS application strategically. You’ll learn what the adcom is looking for, and how you can stand out in the application process – all in just one hour. Reserve your spot today! Wednesday, November 7th at 10am ET / 1pm PT and again at 5pm ET / 8pm ET.

Register Now:

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Columbia Business School: Do You Have What it Takes? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Application Essay Tip: The Devil is in the Details  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Application Essay Tip: The Devil is in the Details
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You can argue about the devil, but certainly the substance, distinctiveness, and success of your essays depends on the details.

Bringing Out Your Uniqueness in the Details
Many applicants tend to bury their uniqueness and success under vague assertions. You don’t want to hide your achievements; you want to trumpet them loudly and clearly. For instance, if you led a team working on a software development project, was it a three-member team or a thirty-member, cross-functional team with representatives from five different divisions and two continents? Was the potential market for the product $5 million or $200 million? Did you launch the product on time and in budget? Did it zoom to the top of the market-share charts?

Using details in your application reveal the:

  • Level of your responsibility
  • Confidence others have in your abilities based on their prior experience with you

  • Significance of your accomplishment

Detailing Your Volunteer Work
Do you simply “volunteer”? If you do, you aren’t saying anything distinctive or substantive. Are you an EMT working five hours per week? Do you volunteer at a legal aid clinic? What have you seen or experienced? What have you learned? Have you launched a bereavement group in a country where such services were previously unheard of? What were the challenges you overcame to establish that group? What did you learn from the experience? How has it influenced you?

Keeping Details Within Word Limits
You may ask, “How can I fit all these details into a short essay?” Good question. Include many of the specifics in the work history sections (the boxes of the application) or in an attached resume if allowed. Then in the essay, use enough detail to provide context and create interest. Balance your profound insight and reflection with devilishly dazzling detail.

Do you need help transforming your detail-less writing into an explosion of vividness? Do you need help bringing your writing to life with the impressive details of your experiences? Work one-on-one with an expert Accepted consultant to create an application that truly reflects the distinctness of your candidacy. Check out our Admissions Consulting & Editing Services for more information on how we can help you get ACCEPTED.

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Related Resources:

Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

• Review Your Essays Like an Admissions Consultant: Use the Editing Funnel

• Personal Statement Tip: Less is More

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Application Essay Tip: The Devil is in the Details appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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4 Tips For Team Interviews  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 4 Tips For Team Interviews
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“4 Tips For Team Interviews” is part of our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

Since so much of b-school life and learning includes team discussions, the adcom needed a tool for assessing how applicants will fit in the team-based discussion culture of their programs. Thus, the Team-Based Discussion (TBD) was born.

In team-based interviews, applicants need to use a different set of skills than they use during traditional, individual interviews. Personal interviews require one-on-one presentation, interpersonal skills, and self-awareness, while team interviews require critical thinking, listening, persuasion, and leadership.

Here are four to-do’s to help you win an Academy Award for your performance in an interview:

  • Review school material.
    This includes the specific materials that the school provides prior to the interview, as well as all other material about the program. As with an individual interview, you need to know the school well – its mission, curriculum, teaching style, etc. Review the school’s website and speak with current students and recent grads so you get a clear picture of what it’s like to be a student at B-School X.

  • Read Case in Point.
    This is an excellent book by Marc Consentino that will teach you how to state your position during team-based interviews, and then clearly and succinctly support your position.

  • Role-play.
    Use family, friends, colleagues, and consultants at Accepted to role-play with you. The more in-the-know your mock interviewer and peers are, the better idea you’ll get of how the interview will run on the big day.

  • Take notes.
    You are allowed to bring notes to the interview, and while you don’t want to read off a piece of paper or even refer to it frequently, it may help you feel more confident knowing that some of your key points are written down in case you need them. You never know how performance anxiety may set in, and if your brain freezes and you completely forget your plan, you’ll be glad you jotted some ideas down beforehand.

TIP: Don’t bring a 400-page stack of papers! You don’t want to spend the whole time shuffling through your notes, making noise and ignoring your co-interviewees while they speak. Paperless notes on a tablet may reduce the shuffle, but they won’t reduce the distraction – keep paperless notes to a minimum as well.

Team-based interviews are totally different from your typical interview experience, which means you need to prepare for them in a completely different way. Check out Accepted’s Mock TBD Interview Services to learn how we can help you prep for your group interview.

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Related Resources:

• MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interview, a free guide

• Are You Selling Yourself Short?

• How to Ace Your Team Based Interview [4 Tips for the Big Day]

Tags: MBA Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Harvard MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Harvard MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020]
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Here’s a look at HBS’s Class of 2020 taken from the Harvard Business School website:

  • Number of Applications: 9,866
  • Enrolled: 930
  • Countries Represented: 69
    • U.S.: 64%
    • Asia: 14%
    • Europe: 8%
    • Mexico, Central & South America: 6%
    • Canada: 5%
    • Africa: 2%
    • Middle East: 2%
    • Oceania: 1%
  • Women: 41%
  • International (including U.S. permanent residents): 37%
  • U.S. ethnic minorities (includes U.S. permanent residents): 26%
  • Average age: 27
  • Average GPA: 3.71
  • Median total GMAT: 730
  • Percent of class taking GMAT: 85%
  • Median GRE verbal: 165
  • Median GRE qualitative: 163
  • Percent of class taking GRE: 15%
<<Check out our webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School!>>

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors (134 Domestic Universities and 154 International Universities):

Major
Percent

  Economics & Business
  46%

  STEM
  37%

  Humanities & Social Science
  17%

Breakdown of Pre-MBA Industry

Industry
Percent

  Consulting
  16%

  High Tech/Communications
  16%

  Venture Capital/Private Equity
  16%

  Financial Services
  11%

  Government/Education/Nonprofit
  8%

  Healthcare/Biotech
  7%

  Consumer Products
  6%

  Energy/Extractive Minerals
  6%

  Other Services
  6%

  Military
  5%

  Industrial/Heavy Manufacturing
  4%

The “big” news in these stats is relatively small: Harvard Business School’s application volume declined from 10,351 in the 2016-17 application cycle to 9,866 in last year’s application cycle, a roughly 4.7% decline. The application volume is still above the volume from 2015-16.

Does this drop mean that it is now “easy” to get into HBS? No. Is it “easier”? A tad, if application volume declines again this year, and I suspect that it will. Application volume tends to be counter-cyclical without the additional impact of ever-increasing tuition and the Trump administration’s immigration policies. So there is opportunity in the decline, but it’s not changing the fundamentals: It’s still very difficult to get into HBS.

Other items of note:

  • More accepted applicants are taking the GRE: 15% in this year’s entering class compared with 12% last year.
  • HBS experienced a tiny decline again in women’s enrollment, which was down 1% again after declining 1% the previous year too.
  • The international percentage of the class actually went up to 37% from 35% in the previous year. Please note that HBS includes U.S. permanent residents in its “International” category.
Perhaps the real news here is the stability in the HBS class. Any change is slow and incremental.

Do you want to be part of HBS next entering class? Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services…and get ACCEPTED!

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsHarvard Business School Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

• What Does Harvard Business School Want?, a video

• What HBS is Looking For, a blog series

Tags: MBA Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Last Call! Get Accepted to Columbia  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Last Call! Get Accepted to Columbia
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There are still a few seats available for Get Accepted to Columbia! In this not-to-be-missed one-hour webinar, Accepted founder Linda Abraham will share a proven strategy for application success, and guide you through each part of the CBS application.

When you’re applying to a program as competitive as CBS, it’s easy to be intimidated. But we can help! You’ll benefit from our decades of admissions expertise as you learn specific, action-oriented strategies that will assist you in crafting a stand-out application.

The webinar is free, but you must register. Hurry – don’t miss it! Mark your calendars for Wednesday, November 7th at 10am ET / 1pm PT and again at 5pm ET / 8pm ET.

Register Now:

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Last Call! Get Accepted to Columbia appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Why Write a Series About MBA Goals?  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Why Write a Series About MBA Goals?
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A few years ago, in the good old days when Wharton still offered feedback to rejected applicants, I talked with a potential client who was reapplying to Wharton. I asked him whether he’d obtained feedback on his application, and he said yes. Well? “Actually they said they really liked my application. They said I was well qualified, and I would be a good fit for the school.” Pause. “The problem was my goals. Venture capital. They said it wasn’t a feasible goal for me.”

Like many people, this person dreamed of going into VC – he surely could do it, given the chance, and it would be wonderful for him – just that his chances of getting a VC job post-MBA were about zero. The adcom knew that, and he should have known it too.

Inappropriate goals, ineffectively presented goals, and impractical goals can get otherwise well-qualified applicants dinged from top MBA programs. This story is not an isolated case. I have heard similar ones every year for the 20+ years that I’ve been involved in the admissions world.

How do you avoid this scenario?
Effort. Thought. Research.

Many people start their MBA application process with their goals sort of sketched out in their head. But sketched out won’t cut it, and if you focus only on what you’d like theoretically, without figuring out how you’re going to make it happen, you might not realize that there are obstacles, as the person in the above story belatedly discovered. It’s not that you should never present complex or difficult goals in an MBA essay, but rather that if you do you should acknowledge that fact and have some concrete sense of how to achieve them.

If the above applicant had said in his original essay that he knew how hard it would be for him to land a VC job and here’s how he was planning to go about it, and if it still didn’t work out, here’s what he’d do instead that would also take him to his long-term goals, he might have been admitted, considering how positively the adcom viewed the rest of his application.

So what exactly are well-articulated, credible, engaging – and ideally exciting – goals, and how do you craft them in the goals essay? The next four posts in this blog series will walk you through that process step by step.

Do you need help identifying, defining, and writing about your goals? Work one-on-one with an expert admissions advisor who will help you clarify your goals and present them to the adcom so you get ACCEPTED. Learn more about MBA Admissions Services here.

“Why Write A Blog Post Series on Goals?” is excerpted from the Accepted guide, Why MBA? Click here to download the complete guide.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs, a free guide to selecting the right one for you

• Business School Selectivity Index, a tool to help you discover the schools where you are competitive

Getting Your MBA Goals in Shape

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Why Write a Series About MBA Goals? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Tell Me About Your Weaknesses [MBA Interview Questions Series]  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Tell Me About Your Weaknesses [MBA Interview Questions Series]
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This blog post is part of a series of articles analyzing some of the most popular MBA interview questions and how to best respond to them. In this post, we’ll address “What is your weakness?“:

Reason for asking the question:
To ensure the applicant is humble enough to recognize that nobody is perfect, and to see how introspective he or she can be in an assessment of oneself.

How to prepare:
This question requires some real reflection. Nobody is perfect, yes, but one can always be striving to be his or her best self. In a work context, what areas do you need to develop? Where do you find yourself stuck? Is there a consistent theme that comes up in your annual review – something you need to work on? Jot a few things down as you work on answering this question. Sometimes we don’t want to acknowledge our weaknesses to others – a natural thing!

Once you have identified a few areas for improvement, think about how to portray those weaknesses so they could also be considered strengths. For example, being too detail-oriented might bog you down with too much work, but it ensures you are thorough, leaving no stone unturned. In this particular example, you are overworked, BUT you also have a strong work ethic.

Important things to remember:
As you detail your weaknesses, be sure you also identify how you are working to improve them.

Additional things to consider:
Try to have at least two weaknesses to discuss, and don’t have them be situational, such as, “my network is weak since I am primarily surrounded by IT people.”

Nervous about your upcoming interview(s)? We’d be delighted to help. Our MBA admissions consultants have a combined experience of 100+ years working either within an MBA admissions office or as a consultant. We know what it takes to be successful in your interviews, and we’d love to work with you to bring out your best self when interview day comes. Check out our interview services here, and contact us today!

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Jen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing. Want Jen to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews, a free guide

6 Steps to Better Self Knowledge and a Successful MBA Interview

• Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays, a short video

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Tell Me About Your Weaknesses [MBA Interview Questions Series] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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We Can Help You Pay for Graduate School!  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: We Can Help You Pay for Graduate School!
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While we’re not offering to foot the bill for you (sorry!), we are more than happy to share advice on how you can pay for graduate school abroad.

Check out the recording of our recent webinar, How to Fund Your International Graduate Degree, during which Prodigy Finance’s Zack Hirschfeld discusses the steps you need to take to fund your graduate school experience in a country that’s not your own.

Topics include:

  • Funding options available for international students
  • How the Prodigy Finance application and funding process works

  • How much you can borrow

  • Interest rates

  • The repayment process

…and more!

Graduate school is expensive for most people, but foreign students encounter additional obstacles – learn what those obstacles are and how you can leap right over them.

View How to Fund Your International Graduate Degree now.

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Tags: Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post We Can Help You Pay for Graduate School! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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MBA Admissions Tip: Explaining Frequent Job Switching  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2018, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Admissions Tip: Explaining Frequent Job Switching
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You’ve got a strong transcript, a solid GPA, and you aced the GMAT. You know you’re a strong candidate for pretty much any top MBA program. There’s just one thing standing in your way…your resume.

You’ve had some good jobs—that’s not the problem. The problem is that you’ve had too many of them, very close to each other. You’re afraid that your job switching past may make the adcoms write you off as a commitment-phobe. Of course, you know that’s not the case. But how do you convince the adcoms that each time you left a position, you had good reason for doing so? Even if you choose to use a functional resume format, there’s no way adcoms won’t notice your frequent job switching habit.

Defenses like: “I got bored,” or “It just wasn’t for me,” or “I hated my boss,” won’t really help your case. You’ll need to explain your fast-paced job changing action with a bit more detail.

Valid reasons for switching jobs:
  • You moved.
    While picking up and moving every few months may require an explanation on its own, it certainly does provide a valid explanation for frequent job changing. Let’s say you had one job during your senior year in Boston, then graduated and moved to D.C. where you landed a second job, and then one of your parents fell ill and you decided to move back home to San Diego to help out, where you got yet another job. While three jobs in the span of a year (or less) is generally frowned upon, your explanation make sense and doesn’t cast any shadow on your abilities to hold down a job.

  • Your schedule changed.
    You had been working part-time while you were in school, and then, upon graduation switched to a full-time job.

  • You were laid off.
    You had a job you liked and where you were liked, but were laid off during the recession, found a job to pay the bills, and then found another job that put you back on your desired career path.

  • You had trouble finding a good job match.
    While this explanation could make you appear a bit wishy-washy, if it’s true, then you should present your case carefully and honestly. While searching for “the one,” you came across some duds that you just didn’t jive with. Maybe they weren’t challenging enough. Maybe they didn’t help you actualize your potential. Maybe you were seeking more of a long-term growth position then these offered. Explain your case maturely—use reasons that don’t show that you’re afraid of job commitment, but that you just wanted more out of a job and were having some bad luck landing the right one.

Make sure to show growth and increased responsibility either as a motivator for some of the job changes or simply as a constant in your meandering.

If everything else on your application suggests that you should be accepted to the b-school of your choice, then it’s unlikely that a fickle resume will get you dinged…just so long as you explain the multiple positions and convince the adcoms that you are, in fact, an extremely committed person, who, post-graduation hopes to find a job that you’ll accept and keep for the long haul.

An expert Accepted consultant can help you take your job history and write about it in the most compelling way possible. Work one-on-one with your personal advisor to create an MBA application that will get you ACCEPTED…despite your job switching past.

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Related Resources:

• The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes

• MBA Admissions Advice for Career Changers

3 Tips for Highlighting Your Strengths in Your Application Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Admissions Tip: Explaining Frequent Job Switching appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Writing Tip: Understanding the Fine Line Between Confidence and Arroga  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Writing Tip: Understanding the Fine Line Between Confidence and Arrogance
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“Tone” is often one of the aspects of writing that applicants find most difficult to pin down. And yet, when you’re writing, it is also one of the most important to control so that you maintain an appropriate tone for your purpose.

One way to think about “tone” is to understand it as conveying your attitude toward your subject. Two key steps can help you become more aware of your tone:

  • First, pause and consider who your audience is and what you are trying to communicate to them.
  • Second, read your writing aloud: hearing your words can enable you to recognize connotations and overtones that you missed on the page.

What type of tone should you strive for in your admissions essay?

For starters, you should ensure that your writing is confident, but not arrogant. How do you draw the line between these two similar tones?

Confidence
Let’s start with confidence.

Here are five tips for staying on the confident side of the confidence-arrogance continuum:

  • When you describe your skills and qualifications, do so with self-assurance. Don’t diminish or hide your contribution – and don’t sound uncertain of yourself.
  • At the same time, focus on showing what you did, how you contributed, and what you learned from it, instead of simply making unsupported statements. For example, instead of just saying “I have strong communication skills,” illustrate those skills in action: “As a research assistant, I met regularly with all members of the research team and made formal presentations of my findings each week.”
  • Quantify whenever possible and provide relevant, impressive specifics. “Led team of five on three continents” is better than “Led team.”
  • Beware of words and qualifiers that make you sound uncommitted to your position. (“Seems,” “appears,” “might be,” etc.). If you mean “is,” say “is.” Better yet, use strong verbs. (If you’re describing provisional research findings, provisional-sounding words are ok!)
  • Remember what you’re interested in. What truly attracts you to this program? Highlight your real enthusiasm, and let your confidence shine.
To summarize:

  • Back up your assertions with illustrations and details.
  • Watch out for words that weaken your position by making you sound uncertain.
  • Find the source of your confidence: the reasons you’re applying to the program in the first place.
Arrogance
The negative flip-side of confidence is arrogance. It is an application killer and a quality you must avoid.

We can’t really overstate how important it is to root out any whiff of arrogance in your essay. Since so many grad programs rely on teamwork, adcoms are looking for candidates who will be good colleagues. It’s critical to come across as someone who works well with other people. How can you avoid errors in tone that project arrogance?

Here are six tips to eradicate arrogance from your essays:

  • As you describe your contribution, don’t make your team’s work sound less important, inflate your work, or (explicitly or implicitly) describe yourself as being smarter or better than your colleagues.
    • Most people don’t make this error explicitly, but I have seen essays where people wrote some variation of “I left this job because I was so much more advanced than my colleagues there.” Please don’t write that or anything close to it.

    • If you’ve left a position, express the decision in a positive way: instead of saying, “I was more advanced than my colleagues there,” or “I didn’t like the environment,” write that you moved to the new position in order to do XYZ, or develop your skills in ABC, or because it gave you more responsibility.

  • Don’t present yourself as being the only qualified candidate. No matter how great you are, there are a lot of other great candidates. So don’t say things like “I am the only one to…”
  • Don’t belittle other people. If you excelled or had a great opportunity, talk about that opportunity and what you did; don’t imply that other people from your school or company were not as successful, ambitious, or prepared. In other words:
    • Instead of: “Coming to college was a revelation, because I had been surrounded by unmotivated students all my life.”

    • Try: “In college, I was in my element, surrounded by other motivated students.”

  • Don’t boast about test scores, grades, or other info that probably shouldn’t be in your essay anyway (i.e., things that are on your CV or application form).
  • Avoid words that can connote arrogance, especially if you use them primarily in reference to yourself and your own accomplishments. (Words like “superior” or “exceptional.”)
  • Similarly, make sure you convey genuine enthusiasm about the program: don’t write as though they should be lucky to have you, but as though you know that it is the right place for you.
To summarize:

  • Don’t belittle other people.
  • Don’t exaggerate your contribution.
  • Remember the adcom is considering you as a potential colleague – not just weighing your stats.
Remember, a helpful way to check your tone is to read your essay aloud. Ask yourself: Do I sound confident? Do I sound like I am making a judgment about something I don’t really mean to be judgmental about? Have I used “I” too much when talking about a group project?

This is also where it’s very helpful to ask someone else to read your essay. Ask them to pay attention to your tone, and mark any places that sound negative or un-collegial.

An upcoming post will address how to maintain a professional tone.

The expert advisors at Accepted can help you ensure that you are projecting a voice of confidence in your application essays. Learn more about our Admissions Consulting & Editing Services here.

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By Dr. Rebecca Blustein, Fellowship Advisor at UCLA and former Accepted admissions consultant.
Want one of our admissions experts to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• From Example to Exemplary, a free guide

• Generic-itis Prevention [Warning: If Untreated, Can Cause Rejection]

Writing Techniques From a Pro

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Writing Tip: Understanding the Fine Line Between Confidence and Arrogance appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Are You Selling Yourself Short?  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Nov 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Are You Selling Yourself Short?
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“I founded a small candy company,” said Roberto.*

I could see in the faces of my fellow admissions committee members that they were not that impressed with the candidate; none of them had ever heard of “Del Sol Candy,”* and Roberto’s modest description did not make it sound all that impressive an accomplishment.

Many times while interviewing international MBA candidates, I have found that some of them sell themselves short, particularly with regards to their work experience. Whether it is because of culture or family upbringing, there is a certain type of candidate who finds it hard to present their professional accomplishments in the best light.

When Cultural Attitudes Don’t Match Expectations
This contrasts dramatically with what is expected from MBA applicants; committee members expect candidates to present their best case and promote their accomplishments. This mismatch between the candidate’s culture and the committee’s expectations can sometimes harm the candidate’s chances of admission. A second layer of complexity also arises for some international students: if an American applicant mentions that they are a regional manager at Hershey’s, for example, the adcom would have at least an idea of the size of the operation, the level of responsibility, and the selectiveness of the company. If, on the other hand, you come from abroad and your company is not well known in the U.S., the adcom may have a harder time evaluating your work experience.

Just by chance, I had been to Roberto’s home city the previous year on a recruitment trip, and I happened to know that the company he had started from scratch was not only the biggest candy maker in the country, but that it exported millions of dollars’ worth of goods to international markets as far away as the Middle East. During the interview I asked him a couple of probing questions about it, and once he started talking about specifics (sales figures, market share, etc.) he became more comfortable. More importantly, the committee was able to assess the magnitude of his accomplishments.

MBA Admissions Tip: Understand the Difference Between Being Boastful and Confident
If you, like Roberto, feel hesitant to promote your achievements for fear of sounding boastful, you need to be aware of those emotions and make a determined effort to overcome that tendency. It is up to you, the candidate, to provide the school with enough information to evaluate your accomplishments.

A good way to overcome any qualms regarding self-promotion is to be ready to provide the adcom with hard data that will document what you have done. If at all possible, do research and be prepared to provide them with a benchmark, a point of comparison with an American company, or at least some details of the level of the operation, but most importantly, the size of your responsibilities. By arming yourself with facts, you will dramatically improve your chances of admission and, later on, your employability prospects for internship and beyond.

Do you need help expressing your qualifications in the most impressive way possible? Work one-on-one with an expert Accepted admissions consultant to create a persuasive application that highlights your greatest qualities, talents, experiences, and achievements – a compelling application that gets you ACCEPTED. Learn more about our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services here.

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

Getting Accepted to U.S. Universities from Abroad, a podcast episode

• “I’m Smart, Really I Am!” Proving Character Traits in your Essays

*All names have been changed.

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Are You Selling Yourself Short? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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Are You Selling Yourself Short? &nbs [#permalink] 11 Nov 2018, 09:01

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