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According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of

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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2018, 13:23
chalven wrote:
According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, companies in the United States are providing job training and general education for nearly eight million people, about equivalent to the enrollment of the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.


(A) equivalent to the enrollment of

(B) the equivalent of those enrolled in

(C) equal to those who are enrolled in

(D) as many as the enrollment of

(E) as many as are enrolled in


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 214: Sentence Correction


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The Official Guide for GMAT Verbal Review 2016

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 90
Page: 264


https://www.nytimes.com/1985/04/02/science/education-jobless-workers-learn-new-skills.html

According to a recent report by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, ''Corporate Classrooms: The Learning Business,'' American companies are providing job training and general education for nearly eight million people, about equivalent to the enrollment in the nation's four-year colleges and universities.


Excellent Question. I picked E
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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2018, 04:53
(A) Compares quantity with process of enrolling
(B) Compares quantity with people
(C) Compares quantity with people
(D) Comparesincomparable things (quantity with process)
(E) The subject "people" has been omitted. The sentence is written in an analogous way. Hence (e).
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According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2018, 22:49
Hey GMATNinja
I have got two questions for you!

Quote:
According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, companies in the United States are providing job training and general education for nearly eight million people, about equivalent to the enrollment of the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.

(A) equivalent to the enrollment of
(B) the equivalent of those enrolled in
(C) equal to those who are enrolled in
(D) as many as the enrollment of
(E) as many as are enrolled in


Your explanation makes perfect sense. (as usual!)
But, the reason I eliminated other options was because of some other kind of ambiguity!
Lets make this a simple sentence first -
Companies are providing training to 8 people, about equivalent to the enrollment of the colleges.

I feel we are comparing the "companies" to the "enrollment". Obviously illogical and absurd!
Companies are providing training to 8 people
Equivalent to the training the enrollment provides to 8 people.

All the wrong options have a similar issue. (C) is comparing companies to students in my opinion.

Is my reasoning fine? :?

My other (definitely more important) question is - how can u have a food blog and not let us all know about it? :(
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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2018, 22:55
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According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Dec 2018, 02:31
1
In this question, there are two parts of transformation to form the ellipsis.
Here are the steps to perform the transformation.

Part I - Changing clause 1 from active voice to passive voice, such that both clauses are in the same voice.
Companies in the United States are providing job training and general education for nearly eight million people (active voice)
to,
There are nearly eight million people received job training and general education (passive voice)




Part II - Combine clause I and II with 'as many as' using the same voice, passive voice

There are nearly eight million people received job training and general education (passive voice)
There are nearly eight million people enrolled in the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.(passive voice)



Then, in the second clause, perform ellipsis by removing the dummy placeholder (there), the repetitious phrase ( eight million) and the subject (people)


There are nearly eight million people received job training and general education
as many as
There are nearly eight million people enrolled in the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.

There are nearly eight million people received job training and general education
as many as ... are ... enrolled in the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.


Finally, reversed the first clause to active voice and combine both the first clause, in active voice, and the second clause, in passive voice.

The result,
Companies in the United States are providing job training and general education for nearly eight million people (active voice)
As many as are enrolled in the nation’s four-year colleges and universities. (passive voice)



Take away:
1. A comparison can have a combination of Active and Passive clauses.
2. When in doubt, modify both clauses such that both are in either passive or active voice
3. Then perform ellipsis to the second clause by removing the dummy placeholder, the repetitious phrase and the subject.
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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jan 2019, 11:50
Quote:
Your explanation makes perfect sense. (as usual!)
But, the reason I eliminated other options was because of some other kind of ambiguity!
Lets make this a simple sentence first -
Companies are providing training to 8 people, about equivalent to the enrollment of the colleges.

I feel we are comparing the "companies" to the "enrollment". Obviously illogical and absurd!
Companies are providing training to 8 people
Equivalent to the training the enrollment provides to 8 people.

All the wrong options have a similar issue. (C) is comparing companies to students in my opinion.

Is my reasoning fine? :?

You're right that the comparison in your example is illogical, but I think the sentence is suggesting that the 8 people are equivalent to the enrollment. This also doesn't make any sense. The size of one population can be similar to the size of another population, but humans don't share characteristics with enrollments.

Quote:
My other (definitely more important) question is - how can u have a food blog and not let us all know about it?

Lol! It's mentioned in my forum signature, but so are a ton of other things. Those other things are general much more useful, so I can't blame anybody for missing the food blog link. :)
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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jun 2019, 22:01
GMATNinja wrote:
This one is a classic, and it might make the top-ten list of questions that cause the most frustration in GMAT-land. It’s a comparison question, but with some ugly tweaks – and if you’re not really, really strict and literal with the meaning, you’ll get twisted up in this one. (And if you want more on comparisons, check out this YouTube video and this sequel.)

Before we get rolling: the sentence is clearly trying to compare the number of people who receive job training with the number of people who are enrolled in four-year colleges and universities. And plenty of the answer choices sound decent, but only one really conveys that meaning with precision.

Quote:
(A) equivalent to the enrollment of

So what’s being compared when we look strictly and literally at (A)? Basically, the sentence is saying that “eight million people” who receive job training from companies are “equivalent to the enrollment of the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.

Hm. That’s not quite right. The word “equivalent” generally suggests that two things are similar in quality or function, and “enrollment” generally refers to an entire group of students as a collective. So (A) is literally saying that the eight million people in job training are “similar in quality or function” to the collective group of students in universities.

And that doesn’t make any sense. We’re not saying that the groups of people are similar in quality; we’re trying to say that the groups have the same number of people.

So (A) is out.

Quote:
(B) the equivalent of those enrolled in

The word “those” always catches my eye, especially on comparison questions. “Those” is a plural pronoun, and in this case, “those” presumably refers to “people.”

So that gives us: “…eight million people (in job training), the equivalent of the people enrolled in the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.” Superficially, it’s nice that this compares “eight million people” in job training to “the people enrolled in… colleges and universities”, but we’re still saying that the two types of people are “equivalent” – again, roughly similar in quality or function. And that doesn’t make sense, for the same reasons as (A).

So (B) can be eliminated, too.

Quote:
(C) equal to those who are enrolled in

This one sounds better! Only trouble is, we don’t care about sound on SC.

Since “those” once again refers to “people”, we now have “eight million people (in job training), equal to the people who are enrolled in… colleges and universities.” This is really subtle, but this is telling us that the actual people in job training are “equal to” the actual people in colleges and universities.

Literally, that seems to making a social statement about equality among people in different situations in life. Personally, I like that sentiment, but it really has nothing to do with what the sentence is trying to say. The point isn’t that people in job training are “equal to” the people in universities; the sentence is trying to say that the number of people in each group is the same.

And since (C) doesn’t actually say that, we can get rid of it.

Since (D) and (E) are so similar, let’s line those two up side-by-side:

Quote:
(D) as many as the enrollment of
(E) as many as are enrolled in

Meaning-wise, the phrase “as many as” is a huge improvement over our options in (A), (B), and (C). It’s finally clear that we’re comparing the number of people in each group, so that’s great.

But (E) makes a little bit more sense than (D). Why? Well, the word “enrollment” generally refers to the collective group of students enrolled in colleges and universities, so (D) is saying that “eight million people” receiving training from companies are “as many as” the collective enrollment of colleges and universities. And that’s not quite right: it’s clearer to say that the “eight million people” is the same number of people as are enrolled in colleges and universities.

So (E) conveys the correct meaning just a little bit more clearly, and it's the best answer.

Hello ninja. The problem with grammar is that it's not absolute it's abstract. Given that, once you know the right answer you can always pull out the rules from the subconscious to justify what is right but the problem is how to get it right first time. This kind of uncertainty is prominent in 700+ marker questions.
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New post 29 Oct 2019, 08:31
GMATNinja neither Dazbog Coffee nor Starbucks offer cortado...

I read the analysis and comments and cannot understand whether the original NYTimes article is correct. The original articles uses "enrollment in" while option (A) uses "enrollment of"; otherwise, they are the same.

Can you please comment on the above? Thank you.
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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2019, 11:37
mykrasovski wrote:
GMATNinja neither Dazbog Coffee nor Starbucks offer cortado...

I read the analysis and comments and cannot understand whether the original NYTimes article is correct. The original articles uses "enrollment in" while option (A) uses "enrollment of"; otherwise, they are the same.

Can you please comment on the above? Thank you.

Fun question! I actually did a little sleuthing and hunted down the original Times article to confirm that it was quoted accurately. (April 2, 1985. A tip of the hat to the GMAC grunt charged with combing through random 30-year-old articles to inspire SC questions.) It was.

This is all a testament to the fact that even professional writers will occasionally produce problematic sentences in prestigious outlets. The sentence in the Times is questionable for exactly the same reason that (A) is questionable. A technical error? No, but not as clear or coherent as the OA, which logically compares one number to another.

So there you have it: the GMAT holds you to a higher standard than the editors of the New York Times hold their journalists! (At least the standard they had in 1985.)

I hope that helps!

(And mykrasovski, bonus points for the Dazbog reference. I'm betting that you're the only other person on this particular thread who has ever been to a Dazbog. :) )
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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2019, 11:50
GMATNinja thank you very much for conducting a small investigation :) The GMAT indeed has very strict standards...

Haha, here is the funny fact. I have walked past multiple Dazbog coffee shops in Cherry Creek and other locations, but have never purchased a cup of coffee in the shop. I did try coffee from Dazbog (my friend got me some) and bought packaged Dazbog coffee in Sawefay. But I am yet to actually walk in the Dazbog store and buy a cup myself :)

So.... "Let's grab some, I am buying" :-D
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Re: According to a study by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of   [#permalink] 03 Nov 2019, 11:50

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