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According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso

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According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 14 Dec 2018, 03:11
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According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Association of American Medical College, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.


(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as are other graduates to plan on practicing

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice


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Originally posted by sdrandom1 on 27 Jun 2009, 19:28.
Last edited by Bunuel on 14 Dec 2018, 03:11, edited 4 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2010, 12:00
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Hey All,

I was asked by private message to take this one on, even though there has been plenty of great stuff written already. Here we go:

This is a comparison question, so the whole point is to make sure we're comparing the right two things, and using the correct terminology.

42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
PROBLEM: Should be "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". That's a three-fer!

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
PROBLEM: Again "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". This one doesn't ever complete, because the "who" opens up a new modifier, and we never return to the main clause.

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
PROBLEM: "Four times AS likely" and RATHER THAN implies preference, which makes no sense here. Also, it's totally unclear what's being compared.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice
PROBLEM: "for minority graduates than other graduates" makes absolutely no sense at all. Where's the comparison?

Hope that helps!

-t
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2010, 08:23
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In this sentence both "more likely than" and "as likely as" are correct but the problem is that "likely" should be followed by "to" in the sentence.


I fell for A....but the correct answer is C.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice - "likely to" is the correct idiom..."likely..... in" is incorrect

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than [are] other graduates who plan on practicing - "likely...... who" is incorrect

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as [are] other graduates to plan on practicing - "likely......to plan...." is correct
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2010, 18:53
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Tommy

Can I can infer that "X as likely as Y" ---> is comparing two nouns?

thanks
TommyWallach wrote:
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2010, 08:51
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Hey Nusma,

Well, technically, it would be "X is Y times as likely as Z to do something". That's the full on comparison construction. But yes, the two things have to be nouns, because the verb comes after the Z (to do something).

-t
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2010, 00:19
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey Nusma,

Well, technically, it would be "X is Y times as likely as Z to do something". That's the full on comparison construction. But yes, the two things have to be nouns, because the verb comes after the Z (to do something).

-t



Tommy,

Can u plz explain how (or if) 'more likely' can be used? Not just in this example, but in general.
e.g., is it right to say, "X is more likely to succeed than Y"?
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2010, 11:20
Okay. Lots of questions.

Werewolf: I think I overemphasized this issue. A and B have tons of other problems, and it may be legit to say "four times more likely." However, D is definitely wrong, because it can't be four times more likely with nothing to compare to grammatically.

I also want to address Ramana's issue, which was also sent to be privately by another student. The preferred form is "plan to VERB." I don't know for certain is the correct answer choice here would be correct on the GMAT. Just know the preferred form, and that this form is also possible. I doubt you'll ever be asked to make a direct choice between the two, with no other issues to look at.

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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2010, 11:22
I've done some searching, and I do think "as likely as" is definitely preferred, to the extent that it's legit to remove A and B for that reason. Phew!

-t
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2010, 06:52
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First of all, "more likely than" and "as likely as" are bothe correct. But "more likely that" and "as likely for" are unidiomatic. Hence we are left with A B and C

A can be ruled out because the two portions being compared by "more likely than" are not parallel. "Minority graduates" and "are other graduates". Instead it should be "minority graduates" and "other graduates".
Hence we are left with B and C

One rule to keep in mind is that infinitives are preferred when a certain action will occur in future. Hence in this case "to plan" is preferred. Also, option B compares "minority graduates" with "other graduates who plan on practicing" which is not correct.

Hence option C is the correct ans.
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2013, 17:05
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Hi Dhairya

According to GMAC and MGMAT, both idioms "plan on Verb-ing" and "plan to Verb" are correct.

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical College, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

1. minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
Wrong. four time + more than ==> wrong in GMAT (see MGMAT Sentence correction, page 260)

2. minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
Wrong. four time + more than ==> wrong in GMAT

3. minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
Correct.
- Four time + AS .... AS ==> correct comparison usage.
- Plan on VERB-ing ==> correct idiom.

4. it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
Wrong. four time + more rather than ==> wrong in GMAT; In addition future tense "will" is not necessary.

5. it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to pratice
Wrong. As + than ==> wrong grammar.

Hope it's clear.
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2013, 17:13
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Dhairya275 wrote:
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical College, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

1. minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
2. minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
3. minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
4. it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
5. it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to pratice


Question : Is 'plan on' an idiom ? I guess 'plan to' is a more familiar usage


correct idiom usage:

more ....than (more....rather than =>wrong)... (more.....as=>wrong)
....likely....to (...likely ....in =>this is wrong)
as .....as (as.....than=>wrong)


1. minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
WRONG.
likely ...IN ==>incorrect usage.

2. minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
WRONG.
who plan on practicing is a modifier ,so sentence should make sense after removing this,but on removing it is not clear four times more likely what??

3. minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

4. it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
WRONG.
MORE..RATHER THAN =.incorrect.

5. it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to pratice
WRONG.
AS.....THAN =>incorrect usage.


plan -to ....and ......plan - on ==>both are correct usage.

hope it helps
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2014, 07:19
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges,

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

Meaning : According to a survey, MG are nearly four times more likely than OG to plan on practicing Z

Option D) “rather” doesn’t make sense. - Eliminated

Option E) “to plan to practice” there are two intents in the same sentence, making the sentence awkward – Eliminated.

I am confused for Option A/B/C.

One of the rule I follow is more should have “than”. Both A and B satisfy that rule. e-gmat, can you please point out the mistake?
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2014, 14:03
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kinjiGC wrote:
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges,

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

Meaning : According to a survey, MG are nearly four times more likely than OG to plan on practicing Z

Option D) “rather” doesn’t make sense. - Eliminated

Option E) “to plan to practice” there are two intents in the same sentence, making the sentence awkward – Eliminated.

I am confused for Option A/B/C.

One of the rule I follow is more should have “than”. Both A and B satisfy that rule. e-gmat, can you please point out the mistake?


Hi Kinjal,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

Option A is incorrect because "likely" is not followed by "to verb". This word is always followed by a "to verb". For example: Kinjal is likely to understand this explanation. However, in this choice what we have is "likely... in planning to practice". This is the incorrect idiom here. Now, the other idiom "more... than..." is fine. But it has been out so cleverly between this "likely" idiom that we only focus on that. There is no problem with "four times more likely" here.

Option B is also incorrect for the same reason. In fact, the "who clause" just provided additional information. The whole planning part now belongs to the "other graduates" and do not even relate to "minority graduates" in the main clause.

Option C is the correct answer as it rectifies the idiom error in Choice A. The choice says "likely... to plan on practicing".

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 13:24
Hi Shraddha,

Can you please explain the role of underlined portion below in answer choice A? Also, this underlined portion isn't present in B, does that set the comparison correctly(provided the error with who is fixed in 2nd choice)?

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

Thanks in advance :)
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 14:14
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sk5002 wrote:
Hi Shraddha,

Can you please explain the role of underlined portion below in answer choice A? Also, this underlined portion isn't present in B, does that set the comparison correctly(provided the error with who is fixed in 2nd choice)?

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

Thanks in advance :)


Hi sk5002,

In both Choice A and B, the comparison is logical and absolutely unambiguous. Presence or absence of "are" does not affect the comparison because there is nothing else in the sentences with which "minority graduates" can be compared. the only logical entity in the sentence that can be compared to "minority graduates" is "other graduates". Hence, presence or absence of "are" does not lead to any ambiguity and hence, its presence or absence is OPTIONAL but NOT INCORRECT.

For example:

Ronny is a better bowler than Roy (is). --> In this sentence, we may or may not choose to repeat the helping Verb "is" because the comparison is absolutely clear. he two compared entities in this sentence are "Ronny" and "Roy". When a sentence presents CLEAR COMPARISON, repeating the helping Verb becomes OPTIONAL as we see in this official sentence.

Repeating the helping Verb becomes mandatory when the sentence conveys AMBIGUOUS COMPARISON. For example:

Ronny is familiar with Roy longer than Ria.

This sentence presents AMBIGUOUS COMPARISON because we can interpret two comparisons here:

1. Ronny is familiar with Roy longer than is Ria. --> Entities Compared - Ronny and Ria

2. Ronny is familiar with Roy longer than with Ria. --> Entities Compared - Roy and Ria

So, if the author intends to communicate the first meaning, then he MUST repeat the helping Verb "is". In absence of this helping verb, the sentence leads to ambiguous comparison. You can also read this article on Ellipses in Comparison for more clarity on this topic: how-far-ellipsis-is-permissible-in-comparison-148973.html

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
SJ
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2018, 22:22
sdrandom1 wrote:
Source : GMATPrep Default Exam Pack

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Association of American Medical College, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as are other graduates to plan on practicing

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

Attachment:
sc03.JPG


Dear experts, mikemcgarry, MagooshExpert Carolyn,sayantanc2k, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja
Anyone can help point out the error of answer choice D?
Honestly, I picked up D
But I have no idea what's wrong with it?

Here is an example,
It is more likely that he will get the job.
I think this example is correct.

D works similary, but D is more complex, the subject of that clause is a comparison -- minority graduates rather than other gradutes.

I didnot pick up D because plan on,

Genuienly need your help.

Have a nice day

>_~
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2018, 13:38
zoezhuyan wrote:
Dear experts, mikemcgarry, MagooshExpert Carolyn,sayantanc2k, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja
Anyone can help point out the error of answer choice D?
Honestly, I picked up D
But I have no idea what's wrong with it?

Here is an example,
It is more likely that he will get the job.
I think this example is correct.

D works similary, but D is more complex, the subject of that clause is a comparison -- minority graduates rather than other gradutes.

I didnot pick up D because plan on,

Genuienly need your help.

Have a nice day

>_~


Hi zoezhuyan!

The most obvious error in D) is "four times more likely that". When we are saying that something is a certain number of times as likely as something else, we need to use "as", not "more". If we use "more", then "four times more likely" actually means 5 times the probability (this has been explained by others above). Here, the intended meaning is four times the probability, which means we need to say "four times as likely". We can definitely say something like:

It is more likely that he will get the job.

But we CANNOT say:

It is ten times more likely that he will get the job.

When we're talking about numbers in regards to probabilities like this, we need to be more careful about our wording.

I hope that helps! :-)
-Carolyn
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2018, 05:42
MagooshExpert wrote:
zoezhuyan wrote:
Dear experts, mikemcgarry, MagooshExpert Carolyn,sayantanc2k, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja
Anyone can help point out the error of answer choice D?
Honestly, I picked up D
But I have no idea what's wrong with it?

Here is an example,
It is more likely that he will get the job.
I think this example is correct.

D works similary, but D is more complex, the subject of that clause is a comparison -- minority graduates rather than other gradutes.

I didnot pick up D because plan on,

Genuienly need your help.

Have a nice day

>_~


Hi zoezhuyan!

The most obvious error in D) is "four times more likely that". When we are saying that something is a certain number of times as likely as something else, we need to use "as", not "more". If we use "more", then "four times more likely" actually means 5 times the probability (this has been explained by others above). Here, the intended meaning is four times the probability, which means we need to say "four times as likely". We can definitely say something like:

It is more likely that he will get the job.

But we CANNOT say:

It is ten times more likely that he will get the job.

When we're talking about numbers in regards to probabilities like this, we need to be more careful about our wording.

I hope that helps! :-)
-Carolyn


Hi MagooshExpert Carolyn
Thanks so much for your explanation.

I thought the original sentence intends to mean 5 times , so I though it is ok that " it is nearly four times more likely that..."


But how should I catch that the original meaning is "4 times likely", rather than "5 times" or "4 times... more..." ?

Please

Thanks in advance

Have a nice day
>_~
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2018, 15:17
zoezhuyan wrote:

Hi MagooshExpert Carolyn
Thanks so much for your explanation.

I thought the original sentence intends to mean 5 times , so I though it is ok that " it is nearly four times more likely that..."


But how should I catch that the original meaning is "4 times likely", rather than "5 times" or "4 times... more..." ?

Please

Thanks in advance

Have a nice day
>_~


Hi zoezhuyan,

Saying "4 times more likely than" is a very awkward way to say "5 times as likely", and so you can pretty safely assume that unless it's explicitly stated, the intention is "4 times as likely". You will probably never see "X times more likely" as a correct construction.

Hope that helps :-)
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2018, 03:56
Option A is incorrect because "likely" is not followed by "to verb". This word is always followed by a "to verb".In this choice what we have is "likely... in planning to practice". This is the incorrect idiom here. Option B is also incorrect for the same reason. In fact, the "who clause" just provided additional information. The whole planning part now belongs to the "other graduates" and do not even relate to "minority graduates" in the main clause.Option C rectifies the idiom error in Choice A. Hence (c).
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso &nbs [#permalink] 19 Dec 2018, 03:56
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