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According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso

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According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 25 Nov 2019, 18:50
Hi Tommy,

I have a question about the phrase "four times more likely than are other graduates." Although the "in planning to practice" in A is incorrect, I was still confused with this answer choice because of the comparative phrase. Since the minority graduates are more likely to practice in certain areas, I though the correct phrase would have to be "more likely than" instead of "as likely as." Don't the two phrases mean different things? "More likely" is saying one group is more likely than another group to do something and "as likely" is saying both the groups have the same chances to do something. Can you please advise if my understanding of the phrase "four times more likely than other graduates" correct? I'm not sure if the "are" is needed in the phrase or not. In general, is "more likely than" a correct idiomatic phrase acceptable on the GMAT? Also, if A instead said "four times more likely than are other graduates to practice..." would A than be a better choice than C?


Thank you!

TommyWallach wrote:
Hey All,

I was asked by private message to take this one on, even though there has been plenty of great stuff written already. Here we go:

This is a comparison question, so the whole point is to make sure we're comparing the right two things, and using the correct terminology.

42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
PROBLEM: Should be "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". That's a three-fer!

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
PROBLEM: Again "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". This one doesn't ever complete, because the "who" opens up a new modifier, and we never return to the main clause.

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
PROBLEM: "Four times AS likely" and RATHER THAN implies preference, which makes no sense here. Also, it's totally unclear what's being compared.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice
PROBLEM: "for minority graduates than other graduates" makes absolutely no sense at all. Where's the comparison?

Hope that helps!

-t

Originally posted by Gmatstudent2018 on 25 Nov 2019, 18:38.
Last edited by Gmatstudent2018 on 25 Nov 2019, 18:50, edited 1 time in total.
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According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2019, 18:44
Hi Payal,

I have a question about the phrase "four times more likely than are other graduates." Although the "in planning to practice" in A is incorrect, I was still confused with this answer choice because of the comparative phrase. Since the minority graduates are more likely to practice in certain areas, I though the correct phrase would have to be "more likely than" instead of "as likely as." Don't the two phrases mean different things? "More likely" is saying one group is more likely than another group to do something and "as likely" is saying both the groups have the same chances to do something. Can you please advise if my understanding of the phrase "four times more likely than other graduates" correct? I'm not sure if the "are" is needed in the phrase or not. In general, is "more likely than" a correct idiomatic phrase acceptable on the GMAT? Also, if A instead said "four times more likely than are other graduates to practice..." would A than be a better choice than C?

Thank you!

egmat wrote:
kinjiGC wrote:
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges,

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

Meaning : According to a survey, MG are nearly four times more likely than OG to plan on practicing Z

Option D) “rather” doesn’t make sense. - Eliminated

Option E) “to plan to practice” there are two intents in the same sentence, making the sentence awkward – Eliminated.

I am confused for Option A/B/C.

One of the rule I follow is more should have “than”. Both A and B satisfy that rule. e-gmat, can you please point out the mistake?


Hi Kinjal,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

Option A is incorrect because "likely" is not followed by "to verb". This word is always followed by a "to verb". For example: Kinjal is likely to understand this explanation. However, in this choice what we have is "likely... in planning to practice". This is the incorrect idiom here. Now, the other idiom "more... than..." is fine. But it has been out so cleverly between this "likely" idiom that we only focus on that. There is no problem with "four times more likely" here.

Option B is also incorrect for the same reason. In fact, the "who clause" just provided additional information. The whole planning part now belongs to the "other graduates" and do not even relate to "minority graduates" in the main clause.

Option C is the correct answer as it rectifies the idiom error in Choice A. The choice says "likely... to plan on practicing".

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2019, 04:23
egmat wrote:
kinjiGC wrote:
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges,

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

Meaning : According to a survey, MG are nearly four times more likely than OG to plan on practicing Z

Option D) “rather” doesn’t make sense. - Eliminated

Option E) “to plan to practice” there are two intents in the same sentence, making the sentence awkward – Eliminated.

I am confused for Option A/B/C.

One of the rule I follow is more should have “than”. Both A and B satisfy that rule. e-gmat, can you please point out the mistake?


Hi Kinjal,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

Option A is incorrect because "likely" is not followed by "to verb". This word is always followed by a "to verb". For example: Kinjal is likely to understand this explanation. However, in this choice what we have is "likely... in planning to practice". This is the incorrect idiom here. Now, the other idiom "more... than..." is fine. But it has been out so cleverly between this "likely" idiom that we only focus on that. There is no problem with "four times more likely" here.

Option B is also incorrect for the same reason. In fact, the "who clause" just provided additional information. The whole planning part now belongs to the "other graduates" and do not even relate to "minority graduates" in the main clause.

Option C is the correct answer as it rectifies the idiom error in Choice A. The choice says "likely... to plan on practicing".

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha



Hi egmat,
Does the following convey the same meaning?
1. four times more likely than (option A)
2. for time as likely as (option C)

If the idiom in option A is correct, then option c changes the meaning because both of the above idioms convey different meaning.

Thank you.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by Asso   [#permalink] 23 Dec 2019, 04:23

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