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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal

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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2010, 20:26
2
6
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

22% (01:29) correct 78% (01:21) wrong based on 245 sessions

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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to wealthy private collectors. Consequently, since thieves steal what their customers are most interested in buying, museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces.

The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?

(A) Art thieves steal both valuable and not-so valuable art.
(B) Art pieces that are not very valuable are not very much in demand by wealthy private collectors.
(C) Art thieves steal primarily from museums that are poorly secured.
(D) Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art.
(E) Wealthy private collectors sometimes sell their stolen art to other wealthy private collectors.
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2010, 01:13
Jamico7 wrote:
Got this question from an LSAT test...

Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to wealthy private collectors. Consequently, since thieves steal what their customers are most interested in buying, museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces.
The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?

(A) Art thieves steal both valuable and not-so valuable art.
(B) Art pieces that are not very valuable are not very much in demand by wealthy private collectors.
(C) Art thieves steal primarily from museums that are poorly secured.
(D) Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art.
(E) Wealthy private collectors sometimes sell their stolen art to other wealthy private collectors.


It has to be D.

B and D are the only contenders.

Conclusion: museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces.

Assumption : Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art.

Also, negate B and D both and you will find if we negate D, the argument falls apart.
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2011, 04:29
if we negate D, then we have 2 cases that could happen
- the museums are already providing better security for the valuable art
- museums are providing better security for not so valuable art

and Garimavyas has also pointed out that negating B also yields multiple cases.
so negation technique wont quite work here

question stem gives us 2 points
-thieves steal the art that wealthy collectors are interested in buying.
-museums ought to increase the security for valuable art to reduce theft.

logical assumptions would be
-wealthy collectors are interested in buying valuable art.(option B comes close but not quite close enough)
-the security for valuable art is not already higher than that for not so valuable art(option D comes close to this but again not quite close enough)

i chose B,but none of the options look correct.
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New post 13 Jul 2011, 07:42
I picked B as well but the OA is D.

I think the way to rule out B is that stem assumes that "most valuable pieces" are stolen because customers are most interested in buying these valuable pieces. This however does not mean that not-so valuable pieces are not in demand.
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2015, 22:05
vinayrsm wrote:
I picked B as well but the OA is D.

I think the way to rule out B is that stem assumes that "most valuable pieces" are stolen because customers are most interested in buying these valuable pieces. This however does not mean that not-so valuable pieces are not in demand.


Hi,

I am happy to help cause IMO D.

Conclusion: museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces
Major Premise: since thieves steal what their customers are most interested in buying

Option B: Talks about art pieces that are not very valuable. Nothing about the ones that are valuable(which is stated in conclusion). An assumption should be something that directly relates to the conclusion. By negation test assuming that "Art pieces that are not very valuable are also in demand by wealthy private collectors." does not translate to same security for all items(atleast directly). There might be same demand for both items but that does not translate to same security necessarily...

Option D: IF "Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art" its in direct contradiction to the conclusion which asks for better security for valuable arts.

Hope this helps. :-D
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2015, 04:27
Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to wealthy private collectors. Consequently, since thieves steal what their customers are most interested in buying, museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces.
The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?
The argument is that museums should focus more security on the most valuable pieces, since those are the most likely to be stolen (and these pieces are in demand by wealthy private collectors.)
(A) Art thieves steal both valuable and not-so valuable art. Given that thieves steal what their customers are interested in buying, this statement cannot be supported.
(B) Art pieces that are not very valuable are not very much in demand by wealthy private collectors.Out of scope - The argument is centered on valuable pieces.
(C) Art thieves steal primarily from museums that are poorly secured. There's no mention of the level of security of the museum.
(D) Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art. The negation strategy for assumption question works here. If most museums didn't provide the same amount of security (provided more security for valuable art), the argument has no function.
(E) Wealthy private collectors sometimes sell their stolen art to other wealthy private collectors.What wealthy private collectors do with the stolen art is not relevant to the argument.
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2018, 15:42
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Guys make sure this OA is wrong, CORRECT OA is B .....
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal &nbs [#permalink] 13 Aug 2018, 15:42
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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to weal

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