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New post 23 Jan 2018, 03:22
ReachIvy wrote:

My Experience at IESE Business School – A Student’s First Hand Experience



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I was exactly two years ago when I was hustling through the 2nd round application process, introspecting deeply to identify exactly what makes me an ideal candidate for a world’s leading MBA program, trying to figure out the best stories for my essays and speaking to alumni and students of the MBA schools I was applying to.

During these interactions and research on school IESE Business School stood out to me and I realised that it was the right fit for me.

First of all, it is truly an international MBA. IESE has a cohort from over 60 countries with over 80% international students. This gives great exposure to diverse cultures outside the class as well as diverse perspective in the class.

Secondly, the collaborative culture. From the very beginning I got into contact with IESE community I felt a genuine warmth and a willingness to help. I experienced this first hand over the past year as I have navigated through my life at IESE. Be it career services, classmates (a bunch of geniuses in their own fields), professors and support staff, this made a lot of difference in my MBA experience.

Thirdly, the focus on case methodology. IESE focuses on active learning methods such as simulations and the case method which allows looking into situations of real-world problems, hence developing a rich general management perspective.

Over the past 16 months in the amazing city of Barcelona, I have met some incredible people, some with dreams to become an entrepreneur, some looking to understand what they really want to do in their careers and other with clear goals to work in a corporate role. Conversations with the classmates have enriched my view towards my own professional as well as personal life. I came to IESE with an aspiration to get into strategy consulting and IESE has helped me achieve that. I will be starting with one of the top three consulting firms in Asia-Pac post my MBA (so sad MBA is going to end in 5 months). During my MBA, I worked for a start-up in Barcelona and interned at a tech giant during the summer. These experiences helped me explore and understand what I truly wanted. IESE network provided me these opportunities to explore and for my full-time role, I was able to switch function, industry, and geography as an international candidate.

In my view, IESE has three main support pillars towards understanding and achieving one’s career goals. Here’s what every student should exploit for their own growth:

Take advantage of the career services that consists of highly qualified professionals who are willing to spend time with students to answer their questions, and push students to think critically so that they help them find the right path.
Be a part of professional clubs. These clubs are primarily driven by students and over the years have developed a structured approach of helping students to pursue their dreams and keep students updated with the latest in the business world.
Interact with the highly qualified professors, who take a personal interest in talking students through their doubts and dilemmas. The conversations with them help steer students towards the right path.
However, ultimately if you are an MBA candidate aspiring for the best of roles post MBA, you should take ownership of your career and drive the job-hunt. This multiplies the effect of the support provided by the school.

Here’s my personal advice for those who are sweating it out through the application process right now.

The first step is to reflect and understand what you are looking for in your dream school. Make sure you connect with as many students and alumni you can to understand what the school is really about and will it fit you or not. In your essays, don’t shy away from writing stories that exemplify you as a leader with purpose.

Good luck with applications as you set yourself up for the best two years of your life.

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* Searching for online classes taught by experts? Wondering how to build your resume further? Have an interest that you are curious to learn more about?
Check our masterclass selection to know more! Click here

* Overwhelmed by the study abroad options available to you? Looking for reliable and accurate information to get you started? Have country and/or degree specific questions?
Check our video tutorials to know more! Click here

* Want to hear first-hand experiences from students at top schools? Keen to gain insights on life at the best global schools? Eager to know more about different campuses while you weigh your options and make a decision?
Check our campus vibe section to know more! Click here

* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
Check guides by ReachIvy.com experts to know more! [url=http://www.reachivy.com/resources/guides.html]
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New post 23 Jan 2018, 03:26

8 Tips for Women to Be Safe While Studying Abroad



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Consider the following statistics.

According to Open Doors (2002), the leading source of US national statistics on study abroad, twice as many undergraduate women study abroad as men.
According to a report by UNESCO, more women than men travel overseas to study.
In the US, research reveals that women account for two-thirds of participation in overseas programs.
As it is clearly seen from the figures above, women prefer to study in international schools. Women are more open to change, adapting themselves to new environment and the fact that they seem to have a natural flair to tackle challenges.

If you are a woman, reading this article, you may suddenly want to whoop with joy! The statistics are clearly in your favor. But before you pack your bags to head to your new campus, you need to ensure that you have done a thorough risk assessment, and taken every precaution possible to prevent unwarranted risks. It is always better to be safe than sorry. Here are some risks women students could potentially face, and what you can do to protect yourself.

1. Be Wary of Your Surroundings and the People You Interact With

As a precautionary measure, keep your guard up at all times. Whether you are interacting with ‘friends on campus’ or outside, stay alert for anything that raises a red flag. Place your trust on someone only when you feel secure. If your sixth sense rings an alarm, though you don’t understand why, it is always better to listen to your inner voice.

2. Don’t Hitchhike a Ride or Get Into an Unlicensed Cab

Whether man or woman, it is never safe to hitchhike a ride. It’s not a safe practice in any city of the world. Also, on the same note, if you are driving, don’t stop to hitch a ride on the highway.

3. Don’t Leave Your Drink or Food Unattended at a Gathering

It’s a commonly known malicious prank to ‘spike’ a drink or food of women who are not cautious. Always hold your drink or your plate of food in your hand or keep it close to you. Stay alert, as you may get engrossed in conversation, while someone mischievously adds intoxicating elements to your food or drink. If you find yourself feeling light-headed or dizzy, seek help of a known and trusted friend to take you back home.

4. Understand the Social Etiquettes are Different in Other Countries


If you have lived in a conservative society, you may find the western way of social behavior too liberal for your liking. Not just that, you may misread some social signals and face a moral dilemma. Before you go abroad to live in the new campus, it would be a good idea to read up about social etiquette and norms that are followed in your host country.

5. You Don’t Have to Compromise on Your Values to ‘Fit In’

Many women think that they will have to shed their values to be a part of the western society. That’s not true. It’s a personal choice. You have to do what you feel is right, not what others dictate to you. Don’t let yourself be bullied into giving up your comfort zone. Make sure that you remain flexible, but only as much as you feel comfortable. Those who assert their own views earn the respect of their colleagues and friends in the long run.

6. When in Rome, …


It is always a good idea to meet the basic acceptance level in terms of cultural adaptation. Find out what behavior, dress, or tradition is acceptable for women in your host country. What you may find acceptable, may be considered unacceptable in other cultures. Make sure you are not crossing the line, and unknowingly offending others.

7. Learn How to Handle Your Finances Independently

Back home, you may have taken the help of your parents or friends in managing your accounts. But as a student abroad, you will have to take care of your daily expenses independently. You will also have to learn how to transact with foreign currency, understand exchange rates, and save money diligently. Also you have to take all precautionary measures to make yourself financially secure. If you have not learnt the ropes of finance management, it is a good time to pick up the basics. Don’t depend on friends to take care of your money. You, and you alone will need to look into your monetary affairs.

8. Try Not to Stand Out in the Crowd When Traveling


Wearing flashy clothes or expensive jewelry is invitation to trouble. You don’t want the attention of muggers in the subway or a lonely sidewalk. As far as possible, blend in with the locals while traveling around the city.

The good news is that foreign universities offer extensive help and support for their women students. There are special groups and international student bodies that focus on women’s needs. If you run into trouble, contact the international student community immediately for help. Make sure to do your due diligence in order to ensure your safety. As a woman abroad, you have the opportunity to spread your wings. You can open the gate to unlimited possibilities. So, keep your common sense intact, and enjoy your study in the college of your dreams.

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* Searching for online classes taught by experts? Wondering how to build your resume further? Have an interest that you are curious to learn more about?
Check our masterclass selection to know more! Click here

* Overwhelmed by the study abroad options available to you? Looking for reliable and accurate information to get you started? Have country and/or degree specific questions?
Check our video tutorials to know more! Click here

* Want to hear first-hand experiences from students at top schools? Keen to gain insights on life at the best global schools? Eager to know more about different campuses while you weigh your options and make a decision?
Check our campus vibe section to know more! Click here

* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
Check guides by ReachIvy.com experts to know more! [url=http://www.reachivy.com/resources/guides.html]
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New post 23 Jan 2018, 03:36

How to Tackle Homesickness When You are Studying or Working Abroad



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Homesickness can arise from a number of different factors — difficulty adjusting to a new environment, feeling lonely or cut off from your regular support system, confusion or problems understanding a new environment/culture/language, a perceived lack of control over what’s happening around you, culture shock, and the list goes on. FOMO while abroad is a real thing, and it can be brutal.

1. Create a Routine
Figure out what you’re going to do as a daily and weekly routine. This means not just waking up at the same time and cooking yourself a great breakfast, but also incorporating something fun or interactive

2. Plan a Holiday or a Festival Party With a Friend From Home

Make a festive occasion on Christmas, Diwali or Holi. Call your friends from campus to join you. Teach a few things about your culture to your new friends at school. Enthral them with goodies from home, and cultural significance.

3. Make a Bucket List for Exploring Your New Country
Do a little research about where you’re living and find a few places you absolutely have to explore –- the ten best coffee shops in the city, the favourite locations for local street artists or all the different places you can go kayaking.

4. Learn Something New

Research has shown absent mindedness is common in those with homesickness. Studying a topic or learning every day will keep your mind active. No better time than this to start learning a new language, how to cook every one of your host nation’s favourite dishes, or begin that yoga/martial arts/diving course

5. Document Your Positive Moments
Negative feelings have a tendency to snowball: you start off annoyed about a bus running late, and end up blaming an entire country and looking up the cheapest flights home. This is natural, but it can get out of control quickly if you allow it to.

6. Talk to Others About How You’re Feeling
It might seem like you’re the only person who isn’t immediately enamoured with Florence, but the truth is that you’re not the first person to feel homesick – you’re likely not even the only one in your program. You might feel a lot of pressure to be positive about the whole experience, especially if you had high expectations when you arrived, or feel the need to put on a happy face when you talk to folks back at home, but there’s no shame in being homesick.

7. Don’t Feel Guilty About Immersing Yourself in Your Home Culture
Just, don’t over-immerse. Sometimes when we’re abroad, we feel like we’re supposed to be 100 percent invested in absorbing every bit of our new culture – but that doesn’t mean you have to completely distance yourself from your own culture.

8. Always stay busy.
This one should be easy. Don’t spend hours sitting in front of your laptop looking at Facebook photos of your friends back in the States. Staying in contact with them is one thing. Constantly wishing you were back with them is another.

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* Searching for online classes taught by experts? Wondering how to build your resume further? Have an interest that you are curious to learn more about?
Check our masterclass selection to know more! Click here

* Overwhelmed by the study abroad options available to you? Looking for reliable and accurate information to get you started? Have country and/or degree specific questions?
Check our video tutorials to know more! Click here

* Want to hear first-hand experiences from students at top schools? Keen to gain insights on life at the best global schools? Eager to know more about different campuses while you weigh your options and make a decision?
Check our campus vibe section to know more! Click here

* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
Check guides by ReachIvy.com experts to know more! [url=http://www.reachivy.com/resources/guides.html]
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New post 23 Jan 2018, 03:43

35 Questions to Ask Before Preparing the Perfect Statement of Purpose Essays



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Writing a statement of purpose from scratch unnerves even the best of writers. This is no ordinary essay. This essay is a compilation of your goals, dreams, and your milestones. Not just that, you have to write an essay stunning enough to take you through the golden gates of your dream college abroad.

So how do you begin to write the perfect statement of purpose? What should you do to ensure that you have covered all ground to create a jaw-dropping good essay that positions you as the ideal applicant?

The best way forward is to create a bank of pertinent questions that help to answer the key questions about your life goals. As you chalk out your answers, you will achieve two things:

1. Clarity of thought.

Some of you may feel confounded by the multiple options, the lack of clarity, and an inability to make a decision. If you are plagued with doubts, answering the questions from a question bank helps to clear your mind. You see your goals clearly, and understand how to work towards them.

2. Comprehensive presentation of your profile.

The question bank will ensure that you have all aspects covered. You may want to mention an important event that changed your life. Or you may want to talk about how you developed leadership skills in a outbound program. If you use a comprehensive question bank, you can make sure to include all important aspects that go into making a well-rounded letter of intent.

35 Questions to Help Write the Perfect Essay for Your Study Abroad

Write down detailed answers to each of these questions. Some questions may have overlapping answers, but to evade the risk of missing out an important detail, write the point again.
As far as possible, give details. Flesh out the story, express your feelings, thoughts, and dreams wherever required. This helps the admissions committee to get a greater insight about you.
To make your story real, make sure to include some failures you may have encountered. But don’t leave the failures unaccounted for. You have to explain what you learned from your failures, and how you plan to overcome them in the future.

Wrap up your essay with a powerful thought, that reflects your aspiration. Use specific examples, numbers and details to establish credibility to your story.
Tie all loose ends. Your essay should be consistent with the content in your resume, letter of recommendation and transcripts project about you. For example, you couldn’t possibly say that you are an avid computers fan, when you have no accolades, recognition or achievements to add weight to your statement.
Questions:

1. Describe any special, unique, or distinctive quality about you.

2. What details of your life might help the admissions committee understand you or help set you apart from other applicants?

3. When did you originally become interested in applying for this program?

4. What are your learnings about the program?

5. What are your learnings about yourself that has further stimulated your interest and reinforced your conviction that you are well suited to this field?

6. How have you learned about this course – through classes, readings, seminars, work or other experiences, or conversations with people already in the field.

7. If you have worked in a professional setup, what have you learned (leadership or managerial skills, for example), and how has the work contributed to your personal growth?

8. What are your career goals?

9. Are there any discrepancies in your academic record that you want to explain?

10. Any unusual obstacles or hardships that you may have had to overcome (e.g., economic, familial, physical) in your life?

11. Any personal you possess that would enhance your prospects for success in the field or profession? (Examples you may want to consider: integrity, compassion, persistence, hardworking, relationship building, leadership, quick learning, team player, etc.)

12. Is there a way to demonstrate or document that you have these characteristics?

13. What skills (leadership, communicative, analytical, number crunching, logical thinking, organizational skills, etc.) do you possess?

14. Why might you be a stronger candidate for graduate school – and more successful and effective in the profession or field — than other applicants?

15. What are the most compelling reasons you can give for the admissions committee to be interested in you?

16. What you want to study at graduate school?

17. Why this particular course or specialization?

18. Why do you want to study at this college?

19. Why us? List at least 3 points that you like about our school.

20. Why study in this country? List compelling reasons why you chose this country.

21. How much and what kind of experience you have in your area of specialization.

22. Is your experience related to your choice of degree?

23. If you already work in the same field, what additional skills do you hope to gain from the specialized program?

24. Would you choose to take up a job or pursue research?

25. What are your expectations from both the graduate program, and the university?

26. Would you like to study or do research under any particular professor?

27. How can you contribute to our university and our program?

28. Apart from work and education, what are your hobbies, interests, and habits?

29. What do you understand about our student community and culture?

30. Why do you think you will fit in?

31. What is that one unique aspect/characteristic about you that we should know?

32. Why does it matter to us or to the fellow students of your class?

33. What in your life story makes you special, unique or impressive?

34. What interests you about the field of work/study for which you are applying and how did you learn about it?

35. What are your relevant work experiences?

These questions will help you draft the perfect statement of purpose. Use these questions to form the skeletal structure of your essay, and craft a winning essay with the help of the points you noted.

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* Searching for online classes taught by experts? Wondering how to build your resume further? Have an interest that you are curious to learn more about?
Check our masterclass selection to know more! Click here

* Overwhelmed by the study abroad options available to you? Looking for reliable and accurate information to get you started? Have country and/or degree specific questions?
Check our video tutorials to know more! Click here

* Want to hear first-hand experiences from students at top schools? Keen to gain insights on life at the best global schools? Eager to know more about different campuses while you weigh your options and make a decision?
Check our campus vibe section to know more! Click here

* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
Check guides by ReachIvy.com experts to know more! [url=http://www.reachivy.com/resources/guides.html]
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New post 23 Jan 2018, 03:53

How Indian Students Can Cope With Culture Shock While Studying Abroad



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“The first two months abroad were excruciatingly difficult. Finding roommates to share the room, adjusting with their cultural and personal lifestyle, and then the challenges of adjusting in the sea of diversity in class. Every day was a new experience at the cafeteria. Initially, it was fun to try out new foods, but I started to miss the aromas and tastes of my home. At times, this distance and homesickness would drive me crazy. I would sit up nights thinking about the overload of cultural differences I was going through. Missed my mom so much. I had nobody to help me with my laundry, cooking, and even tiny jobs like fix the light in my room. I thought I’d suffocate!”

What the student was experiencing was culture shock. Believe it or not, most students studying or working in foreign countries go through a state of culture shock. The stark, glaring dissimilarities in cuisine, ambience, language, social skills, and other cultural aspects make you feel like an alien. It is common for students to feel isolated, lonely and homesick. Culture shock is a reality, that needs to be addressed.

What Is Culture Shock?
While studying and living abroad, you may face a ‘newness’ in everything you do. You may not be used to the rules and regulations in your host country. People’s attitudes and behavior may seem strange to you. You don’t recognize or understand social signals, behavior, or speech accents. What you considered taboo, may be the accepted norm, and vice-versa.

Culture shock is not a hair-raising experience. It is the feeling of disorientation, and difficulty to accept and adjust to the change in environment. If you allow the shock to settle in, it will affect your study and work. You will find yourself feeling low, pining for your family back home, and unwilling to blend in your new surroundings.

How Do You Know If You Are Suffering From Culture Shock?

The telltale signs of culture shock could be any one or a combination of the following:

Feeling low, angry, irritated or anxious
Inability to eat, Overeating or Drinking
Not making friends with other international students
Hostility toward host country students
Physical ailments like cold, headaches, or fever.
Severe symptoms could include homesickness, emotional upheavals, inability to concentrate or work, and panic attack.

How Will You Overcome Culture Shock?
Well, the good news is that it does not last for long. According to psychologists, culture shock goes through four different phases: honeymoon, frustration, adjustment and acceptance.

1. The Honeymoon Phase of Euphoria
In the first stage, you feel overwhelmingly positive. You are excited about everything that’s new. You also rationalize by finding the similarities in your country, and accept the newness as a part of the study abroad deal. You enjoy the travel, discovery, and meeting new people.

2. The Frustration Stage of Irritation and Hostility:

When the love season is over, reality starts to bite. The differences now seem to glare in your face. Things that seemed to be fun, special or interesting, now irritate you. You question everything, want to change the way things are, and grow increasingly hostile towards your host country and the culture. Frustration gets triggered for the smallest reason. A roommate’s habits may blow your fuse. Or a wrong turn you took because of confusing traffic signs will frustrate you.

3. The Adjustment Stage or a Period of Acceptance
This stage happens to different people at different times. But it will surely come through. Once you get over the second phase, the third will be a relief. Soon, you learn the new ways of living. You understand and accept the language, food, and culture of your host country. You find your own identity in this alien world.

4. The Acceptance Stage
In most cases, international students reach the acceptance stage after their first trip back home in their summer break. Once you adjust to the host country, you begin to identify yourself as a part of the new ecosystem. The new culture becomes a part of you. Hence, most students who go back to their home country during holidays, find themselves at a loss in their own country of origin. You may even begin to miss college life. You appreciate the things you took for granted. You may even learn to become bicultural, by learning to balance both cultural worlds.

8 Tips to Cope With Culture Shock

Here are some tips to help you deal with culture shock.

1. Realize that culture shock is a common affliction, and you are not the only one who has had a difficult cultural experience. Be realistic about how you feel. Don’t deny when you are confused, irritated or uncomfortable. You should know that cultural fluency isn’t achieved overnight.

2. Learn as much about your host country as possible. Talk to students, alumni, or residents who have been to your host country.

3. Find a healthy distraction. Take some time to yourself. Catch up with a movie on Netflix or in your local theater. Cook a meal from home, or invite friends for a cultural exchange party. You’d be surprised how many have been through culture shock.

4. Push yourself to make local friends. Get to know the culture from the experts. Explain how you are feeling, and they may have some remedies available.

5. Participate in cultural festivals, community work, and social exchanges in your new college. This is your best platform to soak in the cultural diversity from different countries. It could even enhance your education. Stay active, and keep learning.

6. Make an effort to learn the local language. You will understand the culture lot better when you learn the language. Pick up customs and traditions by following the language.

7. Be more accepting of cultural differences. Back home, you may have been following rigid beliefs. You have the opportunity to increase your breadth of awareness simply by absorbing other cultural beliefs.

8. Don’t shy away from seeking help. You may feel that you can cope with the challenges alone. But it is always best to talk it out with a friend who can help you change.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Searching for online classes taught by experts? Wondering how to build your resume further? Have an interest that you are curious to learn more about?
Check our masterclass selection to know more! Click here

* Overwhelmed by the study abroad options available to you? Looking for reliable and accurate information to get you started? Have country and/or degree specific questions?
Check our video tutorials to know more! Click here

* Want to hear first-hand experiences from students at top schools? Keen to gain insights on life at the best global schools? Eager to know more about different campuses while you weigh your options and make a decision?
Check our campus vibe section to know more! Click here

* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
Check guides by ReachIvy.com experts to know more! [url=http://www.reachivy.com/resources/guides.html]
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New post 23 Jan 2018, 04:26

5 Reasons Why Engineers Should Pursue an MBA After Graduation



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One of the common dilemmas students go through after completing their engineering degree is should they pursue an MBA after graduation or not?

Students who opt for computer engineering study various aspects of computers, technology, and software development. Most jobs that pertain to Tech and ITES, prefer candidates with a technical background. That’s why students who have chosen computer engineering seem like the best fit for such technology based roles.

In the case of civil, mechanical, electrical, and chemical engineering students, there are a slew of careers in the energy, power, and infrastructure industries. Companies that have huge manufacturing, distribution, and factory units prefer engineering students with the relevant subject specializations.

Why MBA after Engineering?

For engineers with a sound technical background, a job in their own technical specialization seems like the perfect fit. For instance, a computer engineer would most probably be happy to work in top IT companies such as Google, Facebook, or Infosys.
However, mid-career, when the software professional has leveraged his or her skills to maximize learning as well as career growth, there can come a time when the career graph plateaus. This is because, for any professional to climb further up, the professional would need management skills.

To break from the technical mold, and blend seamlessly into mainstream management roles, it makes good sense for engineers to upskill by studying in an MBA program.

Here are 5 Reasons Why You Should Consider an MBA After an Engineering Degree:

1. Climb the Corporate Ladder.
The corporate world also resonates this theory that an engineering education with an MBA for post-graduation is the best combination of skill and knowledge required to gain traction for your career. With a managerial background, engineers can hope to fast-track their career to higher supervisory roles, and even visionary roles. This would be painfully slow growth for an engineer without a management knowledge.

2. Develop Managerial Skills.
As an engineer, you have developed a deep understanding of the technical side of work. Your course syllabus strengthens your scientific bend of mind. Number crunching may come easily to you, since you have had adequate practice with mathematical subjects. However, an MBA prepares you for the real world problems. You understand the role of human elements in business. You pick up concepts on communication, human resource management, enterprise management, time management, and other such. These skills are critical for anyone who aspires to take on managerial roles in their career.

3. Understand Business as a Whole.

Develop a holistic perspective to work and work related problems. Business requires to observe the macro level problems. Problem solving is far more complex and dynamic in a business environment. Learn how to solve problems holistically.

4. Fast-Track Your Career.
The average starting salary of an engineer with an MBA is significantly higher than an engineering without an MBA. This clearly points to the fact that the corporate world also favors engineers with a management specialization. You can command a higher pay, and faster career growth with an Engineering plus MBA combination.

5. Experience Personality Development.

Many students who opt for an MBA after engineering develop their personality as well. The MBA curriculum focuses a lot on group discussions, projects, presentations, and industry visits. As a result, students hone their personality, develop confidence, and learn to communicate well. These skills are important for any future manager.

In addition to personal development, students who choose to study MBA abroad, gain a new perspective about businesses, and experience living abroad. This exposure helps to stretch your cultural and intellectual boundaries.

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* Searching for online classes taught by experts? Wondering how to build your resume further? Have an interest that you are curious to learn more about?
Check our masterclass selection to know more! Click here

* Overwhelmed by the study abroad options available to you? Looking for reliable and accurate information to get you started? Have country and/or degree specific questions?
Check our video tutorials to know more! Click here

* Want to hear first-hand experiences from students at top schools? Keen to gain insights on life at the best global schools? Eager to know more about different campuses while you weigh your options and make a decision?
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* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
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New post 23 Jan 2018, 04:29

7 Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make at Your Job Interview



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Know that feeling when you say something, and bite your tongue later? Most people will not admit it, but we have all been there. Job interviews are stressful. And stress makes you blabber without thinking. You want to say something, but somehow your brain compels you to speak about other things. You realize that you have firmly put your foot in your mouth.
There is no way you can undo what you said. Words are like a quiver of arrows. Once you have let them go, there is no way you can turn around the destiny of those words. They could make a mark. Or leave a mark on you forever.
Here are 7 things to avoid saying in your job interview. It helps to be cautious when you are put your best foot forward:

1.“I really hate my job/boss.”
Sitting in the interview room is your potential boss who is looking for a promising candidate. By blurting out how negatively you feel about your ex-boss or your last job leaves an unsavory taste in the mouth. Whatever you do, don’t speak unfavorably about your previous job. Badmouthing others reflects poorly on you. Even if you had a really bad experience in the past job, it is best to let bygones be bygones and move on.

2.“When are your vacations? Will I get paid vacations?”

Even if you are planning to take a trip to the Bahamas, you don’t ask for vacations while seeking a job. You need to realize that companies have to put all stops when an employee needs to go off on vacation. If you want to take vacation time, don’t mention it. This isn’t the time or place to share your problems or negotiate work arrangements. Asking for paid vacation is like pushing it too far. Save these types of questions until after you have been offered a job.

3.“All that you are asking me is already written in my resume.”

Cheeky, huh? When the interviewer asks you a question, you simply answer. There are no two ways about that. The interviewer probably did not have a chance to read your resume. Or he probably wants to hear you speak about yourself. You don’t want your interviewer to think you are one over-smart candidate. So play on.

4.“It’ really hot/cold in here. Can you please crank up/down the air conditioner?”
Keep your personal preferences back at home. At the interview, try to be as accommodating as possible. Your lack of ability to adjust can reflect poorly on you. Bear with the conditions at your office. If you are asked whether you are comfortable, and whether you need anything, you could politely ask for change of temperature, a glass of water. But stick to bare minimum requirements. You are here for a job interview, not on a casual date.

5.“I will do whatever you ask me to do.”

Don’t grovel in front of your interviewer. Even if you are desperate for the job, don’t let that show. It is important that you maintain your dignity, without looking arrogant. Using words like, ‘I’ll do whatever is needed’ is setting up yourself for trouble. Later you may regret having offered your unconditional service. Also, employers value you less when you don’t value yourself.

6.“Will my pay increase after one year of working here?”

Talking about pay hike even before you got the job is a big no-no. You can discuss emoluments, increments, and additional benefits after you get the job. Don’t let the salary become the thorn in the foot.

7.“Oh! I…Um…I…Um…Like…Thought ….Like…Um.. You Want….Um..Like…!

It’s annoying to hear someone speak as if they have not made up their mind. If you aren’t sure what you want to say, don’t say anything. Work on your speech, if you have the habit of interspersing your language with filler words such as ‘like’ or ‘um’. Be clear in what you are saying. Structure your thought before speaking. If you have a problem with speaking fluently, work on your speech. Take the help of a friend or professional advice on how to speak confidently.

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* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
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New post 23 Jan 2018, 04:32

How Important Are Your 12th Grade Marks in Your Future Career?



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As the months of February and March approach, high school students in their 10th and 12th grade begin to feel the heat of the mounting pressure of studies. The ISE and CBSE Board exams for grade 12 happen around February, and for the 10th grade, the Board exams take place in March-April. Naturally, school teachers, parents, and students gear up for the final lap of studies with multiple preliminary tests, revisions and doubt-solving sessions. Many students who also take up private coaching have an additional burden of studies, tests, and classes.

Here’s What You Need to Know About 12th Board Exams

Why are Board Exams Important?
Many of you may have been told that 12th board exams are the deciding steps of your future career. They also form an important part of resume and act as an indicator of a student’s academic performance. If you plan to pursue higher studies abroad, many prestigious colleges and universities assign separate points to your marks in grade 10 and 12, and heavily rely on them while granting admission to the students. Students who are planning to apply for a scholarship program need to show exceptional performance in their Board exams, without which scholarships are difficult to win.

Not just for higher studies abroad, even if you seek to pursue a Masters in India or MBA in a top institute such as IIMs, your 12th board marks will weigh heavily on your admission decision. Placement decisions are also based on the marks you acquired during your 12th grade.

Your 12th grade marks are also important to help you identify your future career goals. If number crunching is your strong suit, you’d probably want to get into careers in accounting, finance, commerce, and other such. If you feel that you lean more towards computers, you may choose to follow a career in technology, computers, software programming, and the like. Some students prefer to pursue vocational training such as journalism, culinary arts, nursing, and many others.

3 Ways to Maximize Your Performance in Your Board Exam

● Closer to your exams, practice as much as you can with previously solved exam papers. Plan to solve least one full length test every day. Look closely at the weak points in your subject and work on strengthening and fine tuning your skills.

● Keep off stress. Stress happens when you let your mind waver to negative thoughts. Meditate daily. Listen to music. Go for a walk. Draw. Paint. Cook. Keep your stress busters close to you.

● Listen carefully to all instructions given at school on how to appear for the exam. Plan everything in advance. Make sure that you have all your resources, apparatus and notes handy. Reach your exam hall at least half an hour before time. This gives you a chance to assess your surroundings and adjust to it.

Exams are just one more step in your career. It’s not the end of the road. If you don’t perform well, don’t lose heart. There are many ways to get ahead in your career other than board exams. With the right attitude and confidence, you’ll overcome every obstacle.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Searching for online classes taught by experts? Wondering how to build your resume further? Have an interest that you are curious to learn more about?
Check our masterclass selection to know more! Click here

* Overwhelmed by the study abroad options available to you? Looking for reliable and accurate information to get you started? Have country and/or degree specific questions?
Check our video tutorials to know more! Click here

* Want to hear first-hand experiences from students at top schools? Keen to gain insights on life at the best global schools? Eager to know more about different campuses while you weigh your options and make a decision?
Check our campus vibe section to know more! Click here

* Looking for top tips on how to get into an Ivy League School? Wondering how to create a stellar resume or select a college? Speculating the best way to spend your summer and expand your profile? All these and more questions cluttering your mind?
Check guides by ReachIvy.com experts to know more! [url=http://www.reachivy.com/resources/guides.html]
Re: Ask ReachIvy.com   [#permalink] 23 Jan 2018, 04:32

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