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New post 16 Dec 2016, 06:51
7 Highly Effective Round 3 MBA Application Strategies

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The April and May final Round 3 deadlines are around the corner. If you have already decided that it makes perfect sense for you to apply for an MBA in Round 3, here are a few tips on ensuring that you have a strong, successful and well-rounded MBA application:

1) Effectively communicate a stellar and distinctive profile
Round 3 is the most competitive application round (more applicants, fewer available spots), so you want to highlight the untraditional aspects of your background and profile. You want to showcase how you are bringing something different to the program, that is not easily available through the other students in your cohort. This could be from your professional or academic experience (a different industry – culinary, aviation, design as opposed to sales or consulting); or your extra curricular activities (from mountaineering and diving, to building a coalition of handicrafts workers to promote fair trade).

2) Clearly explain a compelling reason for why you didn’t apply in an earlier round.
Even though this is not directly asked for in the application, the admissions committee is likely to be curious about why you decided to apply in Round 3. Communicating a clear and compelling reason through your application is important, as the admissions committee may perceive you as disorganized with your thoughts and actions if you are applying in Round 3 simply because you just decided you were interested in an MBA.

3) Demonstrate that you are strongly and uniquely motivated.
Through your application and essays , you want to not only show that you have thoroughly thought about your short and long term career goals, but how they strategically align with the mission and offerings of the MBA program to which you are applying. Use your application to demonstrate your singular interest in a particular program, such that it is abundantly clear to the admissions committee that if they send you an acceptance offer, you will take it without question.

4) You are firmly within the GMAT/GPA range of your targeted schools.
By now, the admissions committee would have already overlooked lower GPAs and GMAT scores, and will be finding a way to make sure that the class average meets or exceeds its usual standard. There is, unfortunately, a lot less room for lower standardized test scores or GPAs in third round applications.

5) Showcase how you have researched the school.
In order to pack the right punch in your essays and application form, demonstrate that you have reached out to current students, faculty and alumni, and to extensively research the university and its bevy of offerings, from academic, to extra-curricular and professional. You have a firm grasp on how your background, interests and goals clearly align with specific aspects of the MBA program’s philosophy and provisions.

6) Showcase your ability to plan ahead and think forward.
By the time you apply, as an international student, the time sensitivity of your visa increases, you are most likely not going to be able to access opportunities like Admitted Student Weekends to meet the rest of your incoming cohort from your particular geography, and most of the best housing options on campus will not be available anymore. Through the additional information space on your application, you want to communicate to the admissions committee that you have anticipated these potential pitfalls, and thought about relevant contingencies, as they apply to your specific application/circumstances.

7) Stay focused on a limited number of schools.
You are time crunched, and need to focus on making sure that you are clearly communicating your reasons for applying in Round 3, that you are strongly and uniquely motivated, you have thought ahead, and that you have done your homework on the school. Each of these aspects takes a significant amount of time, and rather than spreading yourself thin to try to hedge your bets, pick the 3-4 business schools that matter most, and take your best tailor-made shot for each. You can always save a few schools to apply to in Round 1 the following year.

We wish you the very best with your application!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
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* Studying in USA
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* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 16 Dec 2016, 06:54
14 ways to make the most of your high school summer

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The school year is soon coming to an end, and the excitement of the summer and the freedom it heralds draws near. However, you know that there is only a finite amount of time you get to relax. Right now, you are tenaciously planning on how to use this time to maximize the right set of experiences you can showcase in your college application. There is, essentially, a constant tug between spending time with family and friends, mentally preparing for the rigor of the next school year, and delving into activities and adventures that could possibly tip acceptance to your dream college in your favor.

ReachIvy highly recommends that you first take a few weeks to relax, read under shaded trees, babysit your nieces and nephews, go dancing, play and/or argue over cricket and football with your closest friends, or binge watch The Big Bang Theory and sleep till noon. Then, get cracking on a summer adventure that is most suited to who you are and what you love.

Here is a list of options:

1) Volunteer. Whether it is climate change, women’s rights, urban sanitation, amnesty for refugees or global health problems like tuberculosis or heart disease, pick a cause that you are genuinely passionate about, and find a way to get more deeply involved with an organization in whose mission you believe. Instead of picking multiple options, we recommend that you work on specific projects to gain a richer understanding of the operational context of one or two causes.

2) Help a college professor with his or her research. What problem do you want to solve? From creating an atmosphere to survive on mars, defining a lasting fashion trend, or finding a cure to cancer, you can fuel your passion and significantly develop your research skills by assisting a college professor who has dedicated his or her life to finding answers. Volunteer to do grunt work like data entry, number crunching, or primary research like getting people to fill out surveys, and try to assume further responsibility as you build your skills and relationship.

3) Get a summer internship. Do you have a specific future career in mind, or any specific subjects that you would like to study further? Getting an internship at a related company or organization will not only help you explore, but will also help you cement your interest in this sector. For instance, if you love human biology, getting an internship with a hospital shows colleges that you are serious about this subject, and driven to learn more about it in terms of its real world applications, beyond a classroom setting. Try to structure the internship with your employer before you start to ensure that you maximize your learning experience. This is one of the most impactful ways that you can spend your summer.

4) Get deeper into extra curricular activities/interests you pursue through the academic year. If you play the piano, use the summer to take the Trinity College or Royal School of Music exams. If you play a sport, train with coaches and practice hard. If you are passionate about foreign film, take online courses on film appreciation or volunteer with organizing local film festivals. Whatever your activities and interests, find a way to delve into them further over the summer.

5) Travel. Have you dreamed about seeing the pyramids in Egypt, or staring at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel? If you have the means to do so, use the summer to get on your way. If you are resource constrained, travel as much as possible within your state or country. Travel off the beaten path, explore different landscapes, and try to immerse yourself in local culture and experiences wherever you go. If possible, explore options to volunteer for your cause in a different city or country. Document your adventures. Keep a journal, take lots of photographs and/or blog about your experiences.

6) Get involved on a college campus. There are many ways you can get involved on your dream college campus . You can make a visit, or take a course or summer programs for high school students. Immersing yourself on a college campus does not ensure that you will get admitted, but it will give you valuable insights into campus offerings that can better inform the way in which you build your profile in your college application. Thoroughly research your options to ensure that you are enrolling in the right course or program.

7) Join a summer abroad program. The best way to adventure outside your comfort zone is to immerse yourself in a new city in a new country in a summer abroad program for at least six weeks. You can couple your experience with a volunteering opportunity, or with academic research or an internship. There are many summer abroad programs specifically designed for high school students based on your interests and talents, so thoroughly research your options to find a program that best fits your profile.

8) Learn a new skill. Are you interested in learning Ruby On Rails or Mandarin, but haven’t had time during the school year? Use the summer to learn a new skill, which you can continue to develop not only through the school year, but also in college.

9) Take part in competitions in subjects that you love. Do you think in binary? Are you a budding photographer? Do you play air guitar in your sleep (because you can’t stop playing a real guitar when you are awake)? Start competing. There are many global, national and local competitions where you can challenge yourself, become a subject expert, and learn tremendously from your peers. Winning doesn’t hurt your application, either!

10) Study for the SATs or ACTs. The summer is the perfect time for you to start preparing or even take your SATs or ACTs . By getting it out of the way, you will be able to better focus on the demands of the next rigorous academic year, as well as on building a strong college application. Additionally, you have more time and are under less pressure if you need to retake the test.

11) Get better at writing. To be able to submit stellar college essays, you are going to have to be at the peak of your writing capabilities. Spend time over the summer keeping a journal, in which you can reflect on your experiences, and practice structuring your thoughts and emotions.

12) Read. The best way to get better at writing is to read. ReachIvy has compiled summer reading lists for the 9th/10th grade, as well as for the 11th/12th grade that span classics, plays, novels and biographies. Get cracking, get inspired and fuel your imagination!

13) Talk to seasoned professionals in careers that you are considering. If you have a specific future career in mind (or a few options), use the summer to network with seasoned professionals in these sectors who can guide you, and could help you design a career path. By doing so, you may connect with someone who could end up becoming your mentor, who would be a long-lasting source of wise counsel.

14) Start thinking about your college application. Putting your college application together while meeting the demands of a busy school year puts a lot of unnecessary pressure on your time and mental health. By beginning to build your application over the summer, you can tackle the different components in strategized phases, so that you can put forth your best application, without being overwhelmed by your school year responsibilities.

The summer helps you explore as many different ideas as possible, and so if you are in the 9th or 10th grade, pick 3-4 different activities over each summer, feed your curiosity and find your passion. If you are in the 11th or 12th grade, hone in on the 1-2 activities you care about the most, assume leadership and responsibility roles, and maximize your impact.

Remember to take lots of photographs!

If you need ideas and a plan that is specific to who you are and what you want, feel free to reach out to ReachIvy! In addition to helping you with your college application, we can guide you on how to make the most of your time in high school.


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 19 Dec 2016, 06:48
Essay Writing Tips and Strategies

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GMAT scores, GPAs, college transcripts and career history are all part of your application package. The other more real, more personal part lies with you. Schools are constantly striving to understand what inspires you, what dreams and ambitions move you, what sets you apart from the rest of your competition and why are you applying to the school. Essays are your best chance to share with them a great story about you. The admissions committees at the top schools are looking for an impressive multi-dimensional applicant who will be able to maximize what he/she gains from and contributes to the school.
The main idea to convey through your essays is the reason why you are a perfect fit for the school.

Top 10 essay writing tips for a strong and successful essay:

1. Present a well-rounded application – The admissions committee is looking for a candidate that has collected a wide range of experiences, which reflect his/her passion and form the basis for his/her heightened sense of self-awareness.

2. Keep it simple – You need to portray that you can competently organize your thought processes, and that you can persuasively articulate about yourself.

3. Project a high degree of maturity – The admissions committees are looking for students that display an outstanding level of maturity this needs to permeate through content.

4. Show that you are a strong fit through your application – You may be a candidate that is well rounded and has excelled personally and professionally, but your core experience and philosophy has to fit with that of the school.

5. Adhere to the word limit – There is no room for maneuvering the word limits in essays.

6. Write naturally but succinctly – Use simple sentence structure and normal everyday vocabulary. If large words are used incorrectly, you end up sounding pretentious.

7. Use excellent grammar and punctuation – Use logical paragraph breaks to separate your thoughts and to make the essay easier to read. Proofread your work carefully before sending it in. Don’t let simple carelessness ruin your chances.

8. Use the active voice – Be direct, crisp and thorough. Passive voice is highly impersonal and makes the essay almost unreadable. It is too technical and verbose.
9. Avoid plagiarism at all costs – Use your own language and do not lift content from published materials, both online and offline.
10. Use humor carefully – Be careful about how you use humor, and do not take yourself too seriously – this goes back to your ability to honestly reflect individuality .
Make a sharp statement!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 19 Dec 2016, 06:50
Cracking The College Application Process – Our Top 10 Tips

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Planning to apply to a top college abroad? Keep these tips in mind during the college application process!

1. Start Early. Finish strong!

2. Build Your Academic Profile. Aim for those A’s!

3. Engage In Extra-Curricular Activities.

4. Explore Your Career Interests.

5. Work & Live like a Leader.

6. Enhance Your Vocabulary.

7. Organize all your tasks every time! Stay orderly.

8. Involve Your Family and Friends in your Journey.

9. Learn to stay calm under all circumstances.

10. Take that Leap of Faith.



ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 19 Dec 2016, 06:52
College Selection Strategies

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As you initiate your college applications list, there are a wide range of criteria you need to consider before deciding which universities are a right fit for you.
Selecting the right college is a decision that stays with you for your entire life. Yes, your entire life.

If you have used an automated college finder and got bizarre results, learn about how to find the right college.

Top 10 tips for choosing the right college:

1) College Size:
Decide if you want to be a small fish in a big pond or a big fish in a small pond. Examine the student/faculty ratio at your potential college. Size is important in terms of resources available, job opportunities, one-on-one interaction and whether the environment is conducive to your learning and social wellbeing.

2) Location:
Please keep in mind the climatic conditions, proximity to friends and family, commute to an urban center, travel options etc. as you determine your location preferences.

3) Career Track/Specialization:
Ensure that you apply to a college that has a strong focus on the subjects you are interested in. Research the various programs and departments at the school and determine the school’s expertise and focus areas.

4) Strong alumni ties:
A vibrant alumni network is pivotal at every stage of your life. Inquire about the alumni club, engagement of the club in your city, alumni leading your target companies and the breadth of that network.

5) Faculty:
The education system overseas is popular due to its global faculty. Determine which universities are home to experts or Nobel laureates in your field of interest.
6) Life Outside the Classroom:
Education abroad lets you develop a holistic personality and extracurricular activities are an important part of it. Explore the clubs, groups, meetups the school has to offer and ensure you find things that resonate with your personality.

7) Diversity/Global Component:
Gaining a global perspective by interacting with people from across the world is an integral part of a college experience. Look for diversity. Check the school’s website and talk to current students and alumni to determine the spread of nationalities present at school. Placement reports published by schools also give insights into students working lives before and after the program globally.

8) Ranking and Reputation:
Numerous top publications publish rankings of schools for a myriad of programs across various criteria. Let rankings be a small part in deciding your school. They are dynamic and change constantly. Instead, speak to potential employers, current students and alumni to get an in-depth perspective on the school.

9) Cost/Duration of the Program:
Even though several schools offer grants and scholarships, if this is a core criterion, schools that offer more financial aid should be considered.

10) Realistic Target:
Dream big, but keep your targets realistic. Try to strike a balance between reality and ambition while applying to college.

Happy soul-searching!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 19 Dec 2016, 06:54
ROI on your MBA

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For every Jobs (Apple) there is a Donald Trump (The Trump Organization) / Sheryl Sandberg (Facebook) / Warren Buffet (Berkshire Hathaway) and closer to home, Anand Mahindra (Mahindra & Mahindra). While the list of the former cluster may dwindle, that of the second lot, armed with an MBA from a top school, continues to swell.

Child prodigies like Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are rare and difficult to cultivate using traditional education methods – ask Harvard, they tried! If you believe you belong to their tribe, I urge you not to read ahead. However, if you like me, believe you have academic prowess and more importantly have the drive to create impact, read on.

Why do you need an MBA if you want to be an entrepreneur?

This question tops the list of FAQ’s as students embark on their exploratory journey towards higher education and begin evaluating an MBA.

I am a Harvard Business School graduate and founder of a boutique admissions advisory, ReachIvy. Two years at business school, made me dismiss any doubts I had about the efficacy of an MBA, given the high costs and time invested in it.

First, the cultural experience is unprecedented – one really gets to experience a ‘flat-world’. My home aptly has a moniker of an international hostel, as friends stop by from across the globe. Also, I believe that a lot of learning happens during travels. Most top Business schools, organize trips to various parts of the world to learn from first-hand cultural and professional experiences.

Moreover, at school I had access to some of the finest minds in the world. Noble prize laureates and industry experts made up the faculty and the diversity of classmates was baffling. As Dr. Dipak Jain, former dean, Insead mentioned at a ReachIvy event, “Having global experience is a necessity and an entry barrier to top schools. Hence, the difference is the quality of classmates. When you are at Stanford, Princeton, all of them are so brilliant.” Learning from other classmates who started their businesses is an asset when starting your own entrepreneurial venture. I had access to an eclectic mix of experiences and got a deep insight across several industries and functions in the short span of two years. Faculty, students, investors and industry experts help you ideate further, making the foundations of your business model almost water tight. Business school can help you get a head start with your idea. You can examine various business models and experiment within the safety walls of the school by participating in the myriad B-plan competitions hosted on several campuses.

Lastly, the professional network that I became a part of is colossal. In ReachIvy’s Speaker Series, LBS alum Pratik Agarwal, VP corporate Strategy at Vedanata Resources rightly points out “In a business that I started I found that one of my potential customers who runs one of the largest broadband businesses is actually a classmate of mine.” Similarly my professional network is very connected and supportive when I reach out to them; I always get a response.

It has now been three years since I graduated and I continue to appreciate and understand the value of my degree everyday.


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 19 Dec 2016, 06:57
Top Protocol and Etiquette Tips for your MBA Admissions Interview

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Have you done your homework on the schools, programs, admissions committees, students and alumni interviewers? Have you gone through your resume and MBA essays in detail? Have you thoroughly introspected on the top stories that you want to share during your MBA interview, and the top questions that you want to ask your interviewers? Now that you have comprehensively prepared for your interview, and feel confident about how you plan on presenting your past experiences, present state of mind, and future goals, here are some critical protocol and etiquette tips that will help you ace your interview:

1. Be on time, in this case, means to be early

You do not, under any circumstances, want to be late to your interview. Showing up on time is a clear indicator of your ability to manage your time, and tardiness will be perceived most negatively. You want to reach your interview location at least 15 minutes before the interview is scheduled to begin. Make sure that you have the interviewer’s contact information stored in your cell phone, so that you can share updates as soon as you anticipate even a 5-minute delay. Showing up early to the interview also gives you time to relax, compose and take stock on how you are visually presenting yourself.

2. Dress well

The general rule of thumb here is that over dressing is better than under dressing. So when deciding what to wear to your MBA interview, your default dress code should be formal business attire, unless your interviewer specifically mentions a more casual dress code option. Essentially, you would want to dress for your MBA interview in the same way that you would for a job interview at a large company.

3. Exercise basic etiquette

You must build a positive, engaged conversation throughout your interview process. This begins with being polite towards any administrative staff who you encounter in offices before or after your interview, without being over friendly or facetious. Offhand remarks have a way of making it to the admissions committee, which you would clearly want to avoid.
Make sure to greet the interviewer at the beginning of the interview, and to thank him or her at the end of it. Take physical copies of your resume with you, in case the interviewer needs one. Keep your phone in airplane mode, or better yet, completely off.

4. Strike the right tone

During the interview, maintain a friendly, engaged tone with your interviewer. Ensure that you do not respond negatively to any comments or questions. If you feel thrown off, ask for a minute to re-balance yourself so that you can think about and communicate your best response. Showcase your genuine enthusiasm for the school and program through insightful and honest answers that best reflect your experiences and personality, rather than by speaking aggressively or too quickly. Show confidence and build trust by maintaining eye contact with the interviewer, as a lack thereof is likely to make you come across as someone who is disengaged and has poor communication skills. If you have your resume with you, use it only as a reference tool if truly required, otherwise you should be well prepared so that you do not feel the need to glance at it at all.

5. Remember to just be yourself!

Be the best version of yourself – authentic, engaged and confident. Share stories that have genuinely had an impact on your life, and make a list of these experiences in advance. The tiniest inkling of phoniness will be immediately perceived by the admissions committee, especially since they have significant experience conducting interviews. So remember to put forward the best version of your true self!

6. Pay attention to your body language

The way that you present yourself is of critical importance. Your interviewer is going to be adjudicating on the entirety of his or her interaction with you, which ranges from your background and experiences, your ability to articulate yourself, as well as the way in which you communicate with your body language. You want to sit upright and at the edge of your seat to show that you are both engaged and passionate throughout the conversation.

7. Make sure you have your own set of questions for the interviewer

The questions from your interviewer will be centered on determining whether you are a good fit for their specific MBA program. Usually at the end of the interview (depending on whether it is more formally formatted or conversation based), you will be given a cue to share any specific questions that you may have for them. Although this is optional, by asking relevant, well thought-out questions, you have a chance to make a strong impression. Click here to learn more about how to prepare the right set of questions.

8. Follow up with a thank you note

At the end of the interview, ensure that you have requested the interviewer for his or her business card and/or contact information. To demonstrate courtesy and develop a rapport with the interviewer, it is imperative that you send an email within 24 hours of the interview, thanking him or her. Most interviewers expect these emails. The thank you note should be written separately to each interviewer, and reiterate the critical components of your conversation. Make sure to reflect your sincere gratitude and reconfirm your passion for and commitment to the specific MBA program and school.

Good luck with your interview!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 19 Dec 2016, 07:01
Questions to Impress your MBA Interviewer

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When applying for an MBA degree abroad, the interview is one of the most important steps in the application process. There are two main parts of the MBA interview process that you would need to prepare for – what the admissions committee or interviewer will be asking you, and what you will be asking them.
The questions from your interviewer will be centered on determining whether you are a good fit for their specific MBA program. Usually at the end of the interview (depending on whether it is more formally formatted or conversation based), you will be given a cue to share any specific questions that you may have for them. Although this is optional, by asking relevant, well thought-out questions, you have a chance to make a strong impression. Thus, the questions that you will be asking them should reflect your genuine interest in understanding whether this particular program is right for you, and whether it is the best investment of your time and money.
Here are the five top tips to prepare the right set of questions to ask for your MBA interview:

• Have you comprehensively reviewed the program’s website? Although asking questions in the interview is important, you want to make sure that you are not asking questions that are already directly answered on the school’s or program’s website. Effective questions are able to clearly connect your research on the program with specific aspects of your experiences and goals. Questions about the direction and vision of the program and school over the next few years will give your interviewer a clearer picture of how you are thinking about your overall MBA experience.

• Have you thoroughly reviewed your application details? Re-read your MBA application and comb through the finer details. Through your questions, you want to make sure that you are gathering further information on how you would be able to best maximize your time and effort in this program, as it clearly and specifically relates to your academic background, personal and professional experiences, and unique interests and career goals.

• Have you planned your set of questions according to the format of the interview process? Are you interviewing with an admissions committee, current student or an alumnus? You need to ensure that you are tailoring your questions to the type of interviewer. If you are interviewing with an alumnus or current student, for instance, you can include questions to learn more about their experiences earning an MBA degree at this particular school. This would be a great way to showcase your passion for the program and interest in the interviewer, and it also provides a concrete segue into more personalized questions and thus your ability to develop a rapport with the interviewer. Questions should be detailed, researched and specific, and could include:
o How have you most benefitted from this program?
o Who were your favorite professors?
o What were your favorite classes?
o What is a typical day in this program like in the first year?
o Upon graduation, how many of your fellow classmates would/did you closely work with or for?

• Have you kept an open mind? It is also important to keep your mind open during the interview itself. If the interviewer shares information during the interview that interests and is relevant to you, feel free to probe them further for more information.

• Have you identified and prioritized the strongest questions? Once you have a comprehensive list, it is important to identify and prioritize your most compelling questions. Your final question to the interviewer should be “Is there anything else you would like for me to address further?” This allows you to showcase your enthusiasm for attending the school, without directly asking about your acceptance letter, or when you should look forward to hearing back. This also gives you the opportunity to address any mistakes you may have made in your application.



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New post 19 Dec 2016, 07:04
Should I Apply for an MBA Degree in Round 3?

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There are a number of factors to consider around the timing of your MBA application. Round 3, which is the final application round for the year for most American business schools, has deadlines in March, April and May, and tends to be the most competitive round to apply in, since schools would have already filled up a significant portion of their classrooms and you would now be competing with a larger pool of applicants for fewer spots. However, do not be discouraged. There is a clear reason why schools still have Round 3, and it is because they receive strong and inspiring applications every year in this round.

You need to think about the following factors, to see if Round 3 makes sense for you:

• Your background and profile are strong: Most schools, at this time, are most likely looking for ways to fill the gaps in the diversity of their classroom through Round 3. Diversity not just in terms of gender, race, ethnicity or geography, but also how you stand out in terms of having an interesting and different background and goals that could be, but are not necessarily, related to your professional success. For instance, starting up your own draft beer business that you plan to scale across South Asia, or leading a nonprofit focused on revolutionizing urban sanitation across developing countries. Traditional backgrounds in finance and consulting are likely to have a harder time in Round 3, since a number of applications admitted in the first two rounds would have similar backgrounds, unless you are also including uncommon leadership experiences and consistently pursued uncommon interests. Diversity could also mean the number of years of work experience you have. If you graduated from college more than five years ago, you may want to consider Round 3, since some programs may focus on attracting younger students in the first two rounds

• You have a compelling story for WHY you are applying in Round 3: Admissions committees are likely to be interested in why you chose to apply in Round 3. You can use the optional essay to explain your reasons. Good reasons include family and health emergencies, or significant changes in your workload such as time-critical, large-scale projects, all of which should be explained clearly. Wait to apply in Round 1 or Round 2 in the fall if you are only considering Round 3 because you were rejected from your top choice schools or you were not considering business school at all until now. You need more time to structure your application, do your homework on the schools, reach out to potential recommenders, and really think about how you want to position yourself through your essays.

• You are applying to differently structured MBA programs: If you are applying to Executive Education and Part Time MBA programs, like the Saturday and Evening MBA Programs at Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and at NYU Stern, they tend to have later deadlines. Deferred admissions programs like the Harvard Business School 2+2 program may be worth considering if you are applying directly after your final year in college, since schools are not largely focusing on curating a perfect class, but rather are adjudicating primarily based on the strength of your application and potential fit at the school., It is important to note that each school, program and circumstance is unique and needs to be well researched.

• You are in the final stages of your application: If you still have not taken your standardized tests like the GMAT and TOEFL, you should probably wait till Round 1 of the following year, depending of course on how much time you need to study. Rushing the entirety of your application is most likely to be perceptible to the admissions committee. Additionally, you also want to ensure that your academic profile is within the median range of the admitted applicants’ GMAT scores and GPAs at each school.

If, however, you are content with the quality of your application, and need to finalize only a few components, Round 3 could be for you. You want to make sure that you put the best possible application forward.


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New post 19 Dec 2016, 07:06
Language Tips for Writing Essays

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• Careful use of humor – Be careful about how you use humor, but don’t take yourself too seriously – this goes back to your ability to honestly reflect your individuality.

• Watching tone – You should sound excited about the school, but don’t only focus on the brand and reputation. Your excitement should be evident from your knowledge but this should be evident from your knowledge, instead of kowtowing to the school’s brand and reputation. Visiting the campus or speaking with alumni will help with this.

• Write naturally but succinctly – Use simple sentence structure and normal everyday vocabulary (if large words are used incorrectly, the applicant may sound pretentious). Rather than focusing on fancy instructions, quickly make your point and use relevant examples to back it up.

• Make sure that your grammar and punctuation is PERFECT – Make sure that you carefully proofread your essay, especially given the multiple edits it is going/has gone through. Make sure that your paragraphs are clearly separated so that it is easier to read your essay. DO NOT BE CARELESS. Students often write the wrong school name on their application essays. This is why we often advise students to write and save unique applications essays for each school.

• To ensure that your essays sound as powerful as you intend them to be, read them out loud and then print and read them. You will catch any spelling and punctuation errors by hearing what you are trying to say, and as a result you will improve the sentence flow and tone as well.

• Use the active voice – Use the active voice, as the passive voice is highly impersonal and makes the essay almost unreadable (it is too technical and verbose). Keep the verbs in the essay both simple and active. Example of active and passive voice statements:
Active Voice: The chicken crossed the street
Passive Voice: The street was crossed by the chicken

• Do not plagiarize – Use your own language and DO NOT lift content from existing published materials. If you take content/material from existing content, it needs to be in quotation marks, and paraphrased content needs to be cited.

• Most importantly, you should sound your age throughout the essay – The essay should read with the tone and voice that is at the expected level of maturity for a person who is your age. The tone and voice should be yours.


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* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 19 Dec 2016, 07:09
Write a Winning College Essay

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The admissions committees are looking for an impressive multi-dimensional applicant that will be able to maximize what he/she gains from and contributes to the school.
The essay section is particularly important, because the schools can learn a lot about you from your choice of essay topics, to the way in which you answer each question.

Strong and successful essays have some key common characteristics which include:

1. They showcase a well-rounded applicant – Each essay covers a different aspect of your personality/experiences/interests, and the top schools demand that you are actively engaged at:

(a)the individual level – this is most clearly represented through exposure to different art and media (books, music and film), as well as through travel and work experiences

(b)at the academic level – subjects that you are currently proficient with, what you’re doing for supplemental learning outside the classroom, academic rigor and subject choices for the undergraduate level

(c)at the community level – Strong knowledge on current affairs to active community involvement at the local, national or international level

2. Content, Content, Content – Content is the crux of the essays. It is important for you to check for content at each stage of the writing process. As the content is refined, it is easier for the structure and language to automatically fall into place.

Don’t overlap content across the application – use the essays to showcase different sides of you.

3. Keeping it simple – The essay is crisp, the content is strong and the question is clearly answered. You need to show that you can competently organize your thought process, make a persuasive argument and articulate yourself in a coherent manner.

4. A high level of maturity – Admissions committees are looking for students that display an outstanding level of maturity, so this needs to permeate through your content, focus on supporting opinions with evidence, as well as stylization. Please ensure, however, that you maintain your integrity and individuality at all times, but also make sure that you do not seem as though you are taking yourself too seriously.

5. They Make sure you answers the question – make sure you read the essay topic over and over again. Answer exactly what the prompt asks and in the word limit specified. Remember – it’s a limit and you cannot exceed it.

And of course it goes without saying they are void of silly mistakes and, grammatical errors. So make sure you proof read multiple times.

Essays are your best chance to share a great story about you. It is a great opportunity for you to convince the admissions committee that you are a perfect fit for the school.


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* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 21 Dec 2016, 05:09
Recommendation Writing Strategies

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At ReachIvy, we understand that your decision to earn an Ivy League degree is a life changing experience, and one that will involve tremendous amount of effort, time and energy to get accepted.
Whether you are applying to Harvard or Stanford, a critical component of your application package is the recommendations. Schools are eager to know how individuals who have known you personally or professionally speak about your personality, work ethics, experience, discipline and intellect. A strong letter of recommendation provides insights that cannot be deciphered by simply reviewing an applicant’s scores and resume. Letters help in illustrating the qualities of an applicant in depth with specific examples. The admissions committee can understand your work responsibilities and your position within a company. They also serve as a proof in giving the committee an important perspective about your potential and credentials. Therefore, choosing the right advisor is absolutely mandatory.

Top 5 tips for your letters of recommendation:

1) Choose colleagues, supervisors or professors who have known you for an extended time period.

2) Do not force-fit a CEO or a famous alumnus from the school who barely knows you and met you once at a party! It is more important that the recommender you
choose knows you intimately.


3) Make sure that the recommenders reconfirm what you have been writing about in your application.

4) Ask the recommenders to validate their points with specific examples.

5) Do not write your own recommendation letter. The Admissions Board can quickly identify such a letter because they read several recommendations each year.

Dawna Clarke, director of admissions at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business says, “I really rely on the recommendation because I see it as an objective form of information. I don’t have a problem with a student sitting down and talking to a recommender, but I am trying to wrap my head around the authenticity of the recommendations.”


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* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 21 Dec 2016, 05:12
Cracking a top business school Interview: MBA Interview tips

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Are you preparing for study abroad interview? Looking for impactful study abroad interview questions?

If you have secured interview calls from schools you are applying to, then our heartiest congratulations! Most business schools invite students for interviews as the final step in the selection process. Interviews do not follow a rule book. Unlike the admissions process which follows a certain procedure, admissions interviews rarely can be expected with certainty. The officers conducting the interview can ask question ranging from your undergraduate degree to your more recent work accomplishments.

Top 10 Interview Tips:

1) Make sure that you have gone through your whole application a few times, and that what you say in the interview supports the rest of your application.

2) Posture should be relaxed but professional. Consistently make eye contact.

3) Answer the questions clearly and concisely.

4) Make sure you are dressed in a suitable business attire. Men: Suit, with a formal shirt and a tie. Women: Skirt or pant suit with a formal shirt/blouse. Arrive at least 15 minutes early for the interview.

5) Ensure to write a formal thank you letter/email to your interviewer/s.

6) Greet the interviewer at the beginning of the interview and thank him/her at the end of it. Focus on a confident handshake which is not too firm or abrupt, and your greeting which is cordial and disarming but not informal or uptight.

7) Carry only a folder/portfolio with some blank papers/notepad, a pen and your resume with you. There is no need to carry a laptop.

8) Keep your phone on silent or completely off.

9) Diligent preparation is the cornerstone of an effective interview. Ensure you have reviewed a comprehensive list of questions prior to the interview.

10) Believe in yourself. Always remember this.


Study Abroad Interview Practice Questions

These sample questions are just to give you an indication of what to expect at the interview but are not comprehensive by any measure.

Career:

1. Walk me through your resume.

2. Tell me the most important thing you learned from your work experiences.

3. What challenges do you think you will face as you move through your chosen career path?

Current job:

1. What does a typical day at work look like for you?

2. What do you like about your job? What do you not like about your job?

3. If you got promoted today at your job, what changes would you implement?

Program specific:

1. Why are you applying to this department/program?

2. What specific skills do you want to get out of this program?

3. When did you realize that you wanted to study in this field?

School specific:

1. Why does this school appeal to you?

2. What interactions have you had with our school?

3. Where else have you applied and why?

Skill specific:

1. Leadership Stories: Tell me about a time you helped someone else develop.

2. Lessons Learned: Tell me about a time you had to deal with conflict in the workplace

3. Team Environment: What would you do if a team member was not pulling his weight?

Closing the Interview:

1. What questions do you have for me?

2. Anything you wished I had asked you?

3. Tell me something about yourself that you think the admission committee should know?

Practice these tips and ace the interview!
Good luck.


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* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 21 Dec 2016, 05:15
5 Reasons to Build your network and Shrink the Universe

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Networking is a skill that does not come naturally to everyone; people approach it with a variety of attitudes and notions. Some think of networking as manipulative or too superficial. Others are simply shy. In today’s dynamic universe where it is impossible for an individual to keep up with everything, it is imperative to build your own social network. Building a relationship based on trust and understanding is the cornerstone of developing a roster of valuable contacts who could potentially be your clients, business partners, employers, colleagues and even friends in the future. The strong connections made, can open numerous hidden doors which would not have been possible otherwise.

Top 5 reasons to build your network:

1) Cultivate points of contact – If you just launched your start-up, your first and biggest milestone is your first customer; he could be just ‘one person away’. Your level one connection could potentially lead you to the right angel investor or supplier too. If you are looking to do something of out of the box or want to join hands with a local startup that does not visit your campus, then your network is your only way in. A strong network also means easy access to quality co-founders and early employees. Remember, your campus will only give you access to your immediate peers, that too for a limited period of time. Thereafter, you are on your own.

2) Step out of your comfort zone – To build your own social network requires you to do things that you might not do instinctively or naturally such as, talk to the person riding in the elevator or strike a conversation with a stranger on the train. Loosen up, open your mind to new ideas and do things that are seemingly out of the ordinary for you. It is good to challenge yourself periodically. You will see a steep upward climb in your personal learning curve that will stay with you forever. You only need to take the first step forward.

3) Learn from varied perspectives – Meet different people from various genres to grow your own horizon and further your skill set. You are not a superhuman; you cannot possibly learn everything worth knowing yourself. Harness the power of collective learning. Peer through the lens of other people. People are your best source of information. Be a sponge and absorb.

4) Find quick solutions – A recent study mentioned that the 6 degrees of separation have now gone to 5 degrees. You are that much closer to solving a looming problem through a connection. The power of networks allows you to find experts in areas that might not be of your core interest but they might be in the purview of someone you know well. What may be an amateurish skill set for you will be someone else forte. Exercise that option and you will find that the job gets done quicker, more precisely and with increased efficiency leaving you with your optimum solution.

5) Hone your human instincts – ‘Follow your instinct’ is phrase no one is alien to. The most basic human instinct is to form bonds whether it is with family or friends. People possess an innate quality to connect with others. This has been proven over civilizations. As emotional creatures we are naturally pre-disposed to building bonds. Consent to it. Allow yourself to be swept in a natural tide. Don’t fight it.
Want to know how to build a strong network?

Top 10 tips to enhance your networking skills:

1) Join clubs, groups and various associations that spark your interest. Be proactive about contributing to the group.
2) Organize Skype, Hangout, Twitter and Facebook meetups to develop personal contacts across geographies – distance is no longer a valid excuse!
3) Know what you want from an interaction. Your meeting window could be short – do not allow it to close without getting to the point.
4) Learn to listen to people; Do not listen with the intention to reply.
5) Rejection is an integral part of the process. Important people are busy – keep trying!
6) Networks work both ways. Help. Help. Help. Then Ask.
7) Express the real you. Do not project a persona you think the listener might like.
8) Attending every socializer or mixer advertised, does not necessarily increase your odds of meeting someone interesting. It is the quality of networking and not the quantity that matters.
9) Citing specific examples to describe your qualities and achievements is more effective than mentioning generic qualities in conversations.
10) Keep a list of questions and your business cards handy.

We hope you apply our tips to strengthen your networking skills and become a master networker.

Step out. Go meet!


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* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 21 Dec 2016, 05:39
Crafting a Stunning Resume

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How to make a resume stunning to secure your dream job?

How critical is your resume? Extremely. You don’t get a second chance to make a solid first impression! It is a record of all your accomplishments – your snapshot to a potential employer. You may have stellar achievements, but if they are not compiled in an impressive manner, you risk losing your job before starting it.

A crisp, error-free and coherently presented resume allows you to make an instantaneous positive impact. A well-constructed CV should document your skills and convince the selection team about your exceptional candidature.

Top 10 tips on how to create a strong resume:

1) Organize your content chronologically – No one has the time to read an ‘Inception’ like document. Jumping dates is very annoying for a reader. A linear documentation of your achievements and skills makes an easy read and ensures that your progress is highlighted.

2) Quantify your achievements – Putting a number magnifies impact of the action. See what a difference it makes when you write ‘Profit for the year rose from Rs.50,000 to Rs.1 crore’ rather than writing ‘Profit for the year rose 2 times’. The second statement leaves room for doubt giving rise to conjecture – ‘What if the profit for last year was only Rs.10,000?’

3) Identify accomplishments and do not just list job descriptions – It is important to highlight your endeavors and not just describe the role. Everyone knows what a sales profile involves. But mentioning you ‘Closed 5 sales with top 5 clients’, is what will set you apart.

4) Begin your statements with action words – Achieved, adapted, addressed, administered, advised, analyzed, arranged…These are just words beginning with A! The list can go on and they create a massive effect from the word go.

5) Don’t make things up or accentuate successes – It is imperative to be authentic. A small white lie on a submitted document will not bode well in the future. More importantly, you must be true to yourself.

6) Personal information such as religion, marital status etc. is not needed on your resume – If the company is interested to know your personal details, they will ask your for it.

7) Edit, Edit, Edit and Edit again – You may think your first draft is exceptional. But revisit each draft after a couple of days to find minute hidden mistakes. Ensure that you also get another pair of eyes to review your drafts.

8) Be concise but thorough – Say more with a few words. Be succinct. An ideal resume is exactly 1 page long without spillovers from formatting.

9) Check your formatting – In spite of being the most obvious point while writing a resume, this is what is most forgotten. Shadow the style through. If each header is made bold, follow this pattern throughout the document. Using too many fonts leads to more of an eye sore than beautification of text.

10) Showcase your work experience in maximum three bullet points for all places of work – You may have done a lot at a particular institution but you must be judicious and pick the top 3 points that you wish to emphasize. Each line must bring out a different facet of your skill and personality.

Hope you use these resume writing tips!
Under-investing in writing a resume is a huge mistake, which many applicants make far too often. Be smart. Invest your efforts and time in writing a strong resume and get a head start!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
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* Studying in USA
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* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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New post 21 Dec 2016, 05:44
Cracking The GMAT

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The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a standardized test considered by most business schools as a paramount data point in the admissions process. It is understandable why the test warrants special attention from prospective MBA applicants.

This adaptive test (begins with relatively simple questions and gradually increases in level of difficulty based on the candidate’s correct responses) is often misconstrued as a business-focused exam with emphasis on Math. However, the GMAT also tests your verbal and written skills. While some may presume that it is easy to crack the GMAT given that basic concepts are tested, students actually end up making numerous mistakes given the complexity of the questions and the multiple choice responses.

Business schools are generally open to a wide variety of GMAT scores, but 650+ out of 800 scores are considered competitive.

Top 10 tips for cracking the GMAT:

1) Plan and take the GMAT early – Your GMAT score remain active for 5 years. Don’t wait till the last minute to take the test.
2) Understand how the exam works by deciphering the scoring patterns – starts at the beginning, understanding the scores.
3) Practice! Practice! Practice! – Golden Words.
4) Go back to reviewing the fundamentals if you get a question wrong – Review your mistakes. Refer to your GMAT study guide to know where you went wrong.
5) Strengthen your grammar – The verbal section matters more than you think.
6) Build your stamina by solving full length practice tests.
7) Simulate the test taking environment when taking practice tests – Push Yourself. Take a challenging GMAT practice test to know where you really stand.
8) Check the time periodically while taking the test but do not panic – Don’t forget to time yourself even on sections.
9) Ensure you don’t leave any question unanswered – The penalty for a question left blank is higher than that of an incorrect question.
10) Pace yourself and you will ace the test, if you follow our GMAT tips above.

Based on our past experiences with successful students, ReachIvy recommends the above tips to crack the test and move forward in securing your dream school admit.

Win the GMAT!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
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* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
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* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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MBA for Social Good

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Why should I get an MBA to work in the social space?

The MBA program has evolved over the past decades: from a program structured to churn out corporate executives and number-crunching Wall Street analysts to a more holistic one, encompassing a wider range of options and geared towards solving real-world problems. Today, students are using their business acumen to solve the toughest problems facing the world. For instance, Jana Care, a startup in Bangalore, co-founded by Sidhant Jena (HBS MBA 2011) to tackle the rampant spread of diabetes, enables patients to test their blood sugar and seamlessly transit the results to a physician or nurse for appropriate feedback on diet, nutrition and medication. Salman Khan of Khan Academy and Jacqueline Novogratz of Acumen Fund are also shining examples of individuals who have used their MBAs to work on the areas of access to quality education and poverty alleviation to make a mark in the world.
The financial crisis of 2008, mitigated Wall Street’s sheen and resulted in several MBAs opting out of finance roles – some out of choice and several out of necessity. Dr. Nora Silver, the director of Center for Public and Nonprofit Leadership at UC Berkeley Haas School of Management said, “This generation of students is the first that was required or expected to do community service in high school and college. These students grew up expecting to integrate social impact into their work – no matter what sector they join.”

Do Business Schools offer Masters programs to make work in the social space more impactful?

Business schools are also offering support and avenues for other tracks, most notably those targeting community well-being and social entrepreneurship. Oxford’s Said Business School has been at the helm of creating social change with their Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship aimed at supporting world class talent, advancing research, creating a collaborative hub of social entrepreneurs and enhancing the global social impact. At UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, the Global Social Venture Competition (GSVC) provides aspiring social entrepreneurs with mentoring, exposure and capital to transform their ideas to businesses that will have real world impact.
A new breed of MBAs armed with a passion to change the world are starting their post business school careers at social enterprises rather than delaying this transition to a later stage. Scott Benson, a Harvard Business School MBA from the Class of 2008, pursued a summer internship in education and worked on an academic research project on a related topic. Upon graduating he took a role at a large, urban public school system. Today, he is a program officer for Next Generation Learning Models at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. There are several such success stories.

There is a strong demand for MBAs within the social enterprise work space, given the breadth of skills MBAs bring to the table. Elaborating on the importance of MBAs in the social sector, Kevin Bolduc, Vice President of Assessment Tools at the Center for Effective Philanthropy (CEP), a non-profit that provides management and governance resources to define, assess, and improve foundation performance said, “The MBAs on our staff help round out our core competencies. Some staff members bring a deep understanding of philanthropy to our work, while others possess research design expertise. The MBAs on staff complement our institutional knowledge with razor sharp quantitative and analytical skills, as well as performance assessment experience.”
We hope that more MBAs pursue their dreams of truly changing the status quo.


Fly sky high!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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Highschooler’s Reading List

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Read!

Reading forms a fundamental part of everyone’s education. Here are some of our recommendations for college-bound 11th and 12th graders – books that you can red in high school. This high school reading list span novels, plays, biographies, autobiographies; many are timeless classics and award-winning books.

Must Read 11th and 12th grade reading list:

• 1984 – George Orwell
• A Doll’s House – Henrik Ibsen
• A Farewell to Arms – Ernest Hemingway
• A Lesson Before Dying – Ernest Gaines
• A Man for All Seasons – Robert Bolt
• A Passage to India – E.M. Foster
• A Raisin in the Sun – Lorraine Hansberry
• An American Tragedy – Theodore Dreiser
• An Enemy of the People – Henrik Ibsen
• Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
• Babbitt – Sinclair Lewis
• Black Boy – Richard Wright
• Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
• Candide – Voltaire
• Catch-22 – Joseph Heller
• Cold Sassy Tree – Olive Ann Burns
• Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
• Cry, the Beloved Country – Alan Paton
• Cyrano de Bergerac – Rostand
• Demian – Hermann Hesse
• Don Quixote – Cervantes
• Dracula – Bram Stoker
• East of Eden – John Steinbeck
• Ethan Frome – Edith Wharton
• Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
• Far from the Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
• Fences – August Wilson
• Frankenstein – Mary Shelley
• Grendel – John Gardner
• Gulliver’s Travels – Jonathan Swift
• Hard Times – Charles Dickens
• Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
• Invisible Man – Ralph Ellison
• Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
• Jubilee – Margaret Walker
• Macbeth – William Shakespeare
• Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
• Malgudi Days: Swami & Friends – R K Narayan
• Moby Dick – Herman Melville
• Murder in the Cathedral – T.S. Eliot
• My Antonia – Willa Cather
• No Exit – Jean-Paul Satre
• Oedipus Rex – Sophocles
• Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
• One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich – Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
• Picture of Dorian Gray – Oscar Wilde
• Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man- James Joyce
• Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
• Pygmalion- George Bernard Shaw
• Siddhartha – Hermann Hesse
• Sister Carrie -Theodore Dreiser
• The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain
• The Autobiography of Malcolm X – Malcolm Little
• The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
• The Canterbury Tales – Geoffrey Chaucer
• The Color Purple by Alice Walker
• The Crucible – Arthur Miller
• The Death of a Salesman – Arthur Miller
• The Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
• The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald
• The Jungle – Upton Sinclair
• The Mayor of Casterbridge – Thomas Hardy
• The Metamorphosis – Franz Kafka
• The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail – Jerome & R. E. Lee Lawrence
• The Plague – Albert Camus
• The Power and the Glory – Graham Greene
• The Prince – Niccolo Machiavelli
• The Red Badge of Courage – Stephen Crane
• The Scarlet Letter – Nathaniel Hawthorne
• The Stranger – Albert Camus
• The Story of my Experiments with Truth – MK Gandhi
• The Tempest – William Shakespeare
• Their Eyes Were Watching God – Zora Neale Hurston
• Things Fall Apart – Chinua Achebe
• Turn of the Screw – Henry James
• Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
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* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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Reading List: 9th & 10th Grade

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Read!

Start the new year with a new resolution to read.
Reading forms a fundamental part of everyone’s education. Here are some recommendations for college-bound 9th and 10th graders. The titles span novels, plays, biographies, autobiographies; many are timeless classics and award-winning books.

ReachIvy has compiled a 9th and 10th grade reading list (a must read books list!) with the goal to nourish your intellect. In the process, we hope you increase your love for reading!

Must Read:

• 1984 – George Orwell
• A Death in the Family – Agee James
• A Farewell to Arms – Ernest Hemingway
• A Lesson Before Dying – Ernest Gaines
• A Thief of Time – Tony Hillerman
• Animal Farm – Orwell
• Black Like Me – Griffin
• Dune – Frank Herbert
• dFahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
• Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
• I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings – Maya Angelou
• Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
• Jubilee – Margaret Walker
• Malgudi Days: Swami & Friends – R K Narayan
• My Antonia – Willa Cather
• Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
• Rebecca – Daphne du Maurier
• Romeo and Juliet – William Shakespeare
• Ruskin Bond’s Short stories
• Silas Marner – George Eliot
• The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain
• The Chosen – Chaim Potok
• The Crucible – Arthur Miller
• The Crystal Cave – Mary Stewart
• The Diary of a Time Space Traveller and other Stories – Satyajit Ray
• The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald
• The Hobbit – J.R. Tolkien
• The Hound of the Baskervilles – Arthur Conan Doyle
• The Odyssey – Homer
• The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway
• The Prince and the Pauper – Mark Twain
• The Red Badge of Courage – Stephen Crane
• The Scarlet Letter – Nathaniel Hawthorne
• The Story of my Experiments with Truth – MK Gandhi
• The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
• To Be Young, Gifted, and Black – Lorraine Hansberry
• To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
• Village by the Sea – Anita Desai
• When Legends Die – Hal Borland
• Wings of Fire – APJ Abdul Kalam
• White Fang – Jack London


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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How to Write an Effective Resume – Top Five Resume Writing Tips

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A resume is a very important tool for all of us – whether we are students dream using this document as a college application resume or professionals looking to enter our dream job. Think of the resume as a snapshot – not only of your professional accomplishments but academic, personal and community. It’s an opportunity to showcase how strong a fit you are for the school or company.

So how do you maximize the impact the resume can make? Here are my top 5 tips for writing a college application resume and professional resume:

1. Relevance. First and foremost make sure you tailor the resume to where you are applying. Highlight your relevant strengths. Additionally, make sure that you do your homework on the specific requirements the company or college may ask for. For example a an MBA application resume generally needs to be 1 page long, where as an employment resume can be longer.

2. Action Verbs. Describe each of your accomplishments with strong verbs that clearly demonstrate both the breadth and depth of experience. Additionally, avoid using the same action verb multiple times.

For example, instead of writing:
• Handled business development for….
• Handled campaigns for…
• Responsible for handling….

Replace with alternatives like:
• Spearheaded business development for
• Led campaigns for….
• Managed….

3. Quantify. Provide numbers where possible. Instead of general statements include numbers that provide specifics including time, money or amount. Read the two bullets below and decide what leaves a larger impact on you:
• Headed a project to streamline business …
• Led at team of 6 to streamline a $15,000 infrastructure project…

4. Be specific. Avoid generic statements. In addition to explaining to the reader what you did, include why and how you did it. What was the outcome. Since you have included it in your resume, the reader should be able to understand the role you played and why this activity is significant.

For example – instead of writing “Led the payment process initiative” or “Established the technical operation guidelines” explain what prompted you to do this (e.g. identified gaps in…) or how you did it (e.g. analyzed past data….) and was it successful (e.g. reduced time spent…).

5. Avoid Silly mistakes. I know this seems obvious but with stress levels high or deadlines around the corner this happens too often. Silly mistakes come in many forms including
spelling mistakes, grammatical errors or inputting the wrong word by accident. Can you spot what’s wrong in the statements below:

• Discussed growth opportunities with senior Management.
• Took a career break in 2003 to renovate my horse
• Bachelor in Science
• I’m attacking my resume for your review
• Managed the daily operations

You cannot proofread your resume too many times. The very best of us continue to make errors like these every day. If you feel like you’ve read your resume over 50 times and there are no more mistakes – take a break and come back to it later. You will definitely see something else. Send it to close friends or family. Every eye gravitates toward and catches something different.

Hope my tips help in writing your college application resume or your professional resume!


ReachIvy sincerely hopes that this article serves as a critical tool to increase your knowledge base. For study abroad consultation or career counseling with ReachIvy, Submit a Query now! Also, review our resources to access our free premium content.
http://www.reachivy.com

* Studying in USA
* Campus Vibe: Harvard University
* Campus Vibe: The Wharton School
* Masterclass: Design Thinking by Prof. Bhatia
* Creative Writing: The power of Fiction by Aditi Sriram
* Webinar with IESE Business School by Anjaney Borwankar
* Masterclass: How can an MBA enhance your entrepreneurial journey?
* Webinar with Vanderbilt’s Owen Graduate School of Management by Kim Killingsworth
* Masterclass: Kalpesh Kapadia, CEO, SelfScore – Personal Finance Tips and the Importance of a Credit History for New Students in the US

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