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Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a

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Re: Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2015, 07:11
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EvaJager wrote:
fameatop wrote:
Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a rectangular tabletop so that it covers the entire tabletop and its edges are parallel to the edges of the tabletop?
(1) The tabletop is 36 inches wide by 60 inches long.
(2) The area of one side of the sheet of glass is 2,400 square inches.

Question can be restated as "Is Glass sheet rectangular & of same dimensions as that of tabletop?"
1) No info is given about glass sheet dimensions- Insufficient
2) No info is given regarding the dimensions of tabletop & its not stated whether the glass sheet is Rectangular, Square or Parallelogram etc.--->Insufficient
1+2) No info is given whether the glass sheet is Rectangular, Square or Parallelogram etc ---Insufficient

Answer E


The question says "Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass..."

Maybe it looks strange the information in statement (2): "The area of one side of the sheet of glass..."
But, the sheet of glass is in fact a 3D object, a rectangular box, probably quite thin. So, we are talking about a rectangular side with the largest area. I don't think they cut the glass at an angle other than 90 degrees.
Anyway, the answer is E because the area of 2,400 although greater than 36*60 = 2,160, if the dimensions of the sheet are 30 and 80, it will not cover the tabletop.
But if the dimensions are 40 and 60, then yes.
The sheet of glass needs to cover the tabletop, not necessarily to be of identical dimensions. In other words, the sheet of glass can be larger than the tabletop, although this isn't practical....


Hi guys!

To me, this question got me on this part of Statement 2: "The area of one side of the sheet of glass..." it really confused me, but once I imagined the sheet of glass as one 3D plate, with a thin layer as its height, and 3 surface areas (side areas) it was clear that the statement was referring to the surface area of one side, and that on the bottom line it was not sufficient since we don't have any info about the tabletop to compare with.

Am I right here ?

Thanks everyone!

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Re: Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2015, 07:27
cfpenteado wrote:
EvaJager wrote:
fameatop wrote:
Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a rectangular tabletop so that it covers the entire tabletop and its edges are parallel to the edges of the tabletop?
(1) The tabletop is 36 inches wide by 60 inches long.
(2) The area of one side of the sheet of glass is 2,400 square inches.

Question can be restated as "Is Glass sheet rectangular & of same dimensions as that of tabletop?"
1) No info is given about glass sheet dimensions- Insufficient
2) No info is given regarding the dimensions of tabletop & its not stated whether the glass sheet is Rectangular, Square or Parallelogram etc.--->Insufficient
1+2) No info is given whether the glass sheet is Rectangular, Square or Parallelogram etc ---Insufficient

Answer E


The question says "Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass..."

Maybe it looks strange the information in statement (2): "The area of one side of the sheet of glass..."
But, the sheet of glass is in fact a 3D object, a rectangular box, probably quite thin. So, we are talking about a rectangular side with the largest area. I don't think they cut the glass at an angle other than 90 degrees.
Anyway, the answer is E because the area of 2,400 although greater than 36*60 = 2,160, if the dimensions of the sheet are 30 and 80, it will not cover the tabletop.
But if the dimensions are 40 and 60, then yes.
The sheet of glass needs to cover the tabletop, not necessarily to be of identical dimensions. In other words, the sheet of glass can be larger than the tabletop, although this isn't practical....


Hi guys!

To me, this question got me on this part of Statement 2: "The area of one side of the sheet of glass..." it really confused me, but once I imagined the sheet of glass as one 3D plate, with a thin layer as its height, and 3 surface areas (side areas) it was clear that the statement was referring to the surface area of one side, and that on the bottom line it was not sufficient since we don't have any info about the tabletop to compare with.

Am I right here ?

Thanks everyone!


Yes, for statement 2 to be sufficient you needed to have 2 pieces of information:

1. Area of the tabletop
2. Area of the glass face parallel to the tabletop. If you are given "area" of a side of a cuboid , this area can belong to any of the 6 surface areas. This is the reason why even when you combine the 2 statements , you still do not have an unambiguous yes or no
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Re: Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2015, 07:34
Hi guys!

To me, this question got me on this part of Statement 2: "The area of one side of the sheet of glass..." it really confused me, but once I imagined the sheet of glass as one 3D plate, with a thin layer as its height, and 3 surface areas (side areas) it was clear that the statement was referring to the surface area of one side, and that on the bottom line it was not sufficient since we don't have any info about the tabletop to compare with.

Am I right here ?

Thanks everyone![/quote]

Yes, for statement 2 to be sufficient you needed to have 2 pieces of information:

1. Area of the tabletop
2. Area of the glass face parallel to the tabletop. If you are given "area" of a side of a cuboid , this area can belong to any of the 6 surface areas. This is the reason why even when you combine the 2 statements , you still do not have an unambiguous yes or no[/quote]

Nice, thanks.
Interpretation got me good on this one!

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Re: Geometry question [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2015, 03:29
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soh_acca wrote:
There is a question in official guide for GMAT Review 2015, "Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned
on a rectangular tabletop so that it covers the entire
tabletop and its edges are parallel to the edges of the
tabletop?
(1) The tabletop is 36 inches wide by 60 inches
long.
(2) The area of one side of the sheet of glass is
2,400 square inches."

I thought that option (1) would be sufficient while (2) would not be. But the correct answer is that both statements together are still not sufficient.

Can someone explain this?


Hi soh_acca,

You posted this question in some other forum also, so copying my response.
Also, as a general rule, search a question on GMAT Club before posting it again.

Statement 1 is not sufficient because we do not have any information about the sheet
Statement 2 is not sufficient because we do not have any information about the table top

Combining the both, we do not have any information about the orientation of the sheet.

Hence both statements combined can also not answer the question

Hence option E
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Re: Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2016, 16:08
Bunuel wrote:
Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a rectangular tabletop so that it covers the entire tabletop and its edges are parallel to the edges of the tabletop?

(1) The tabletop is 36 inches wide by 60 inches long.
(2) The area of one side of the sheet of glass is 2,400 square inches.



We need to determine whether a rectangular sheet of glass can cover an entire rectangular tabletop. We are given that the edges must be parallel to the table top; however, we know neither the dimensions of the sheet of glass nor the dimensions of the tabletop.

Statement One Alone:

The tabletop is 36 inches wide by 60 inches long.

Since we do not have any information about the dimensions of the rectangular sheet of glass, statement one alone is not sufficient to answer the question. We can eliminate answer choices A and D.

Statement Two Alone:

The area of one side of the sheet of glass is 2,400 square inches.

Since we do not have any information about the dimensions of the tabletop, statement two alone is not sufficient to answer the question. We can eliminate answer choice B.

Statements One and Two Together:

Using the information from statements one and two we know the following:

1) The tabletop is 36 inches wide by 60 inches long.

2) The area of one side of the sheet of glass is 2,400 square inches.

While initially we may think we have enough information to solve the problem, we actually do not, because we do not know the exact dimensions of the sheet of glass.

With an area of 2,400 square inches, we can have different lengths and widths of the sheet of glass. Some of these lengths and widths will allow the sheet to cover the table, while others will not. Let’s consider two cases.

Case # 1

Width of glass = 24 inches

Length of glass = 100 inches

Width of table = 36 inches

Length of table = 60 inches

We see that the width of the glass is shorter than the width of the table, so in case #1, the sheet of glass does not cover the entire table top.

Case # 2

Width of glass = 40 inches

Length of glass = 60 inches

Width of table = 36 inches

Length of table = 60 inches

We see that the width of the glass is longer than the width of the table and the length of the glass is equal to the length of the table, so in case #2, the sheet of glass does cover the entire table top.

The answer is E.
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Re: Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a rectangula [#permalink]

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New post 17 Feb 2017, 07:58
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Statement A: insufficient
No information about sheet of glass.

Option B: insufficient
No information about table top.

Combining: area of table top A= 36*60
Area of sheet of glass B= 2400.

But that can be 1*2400
2*1200
Or 40*60.
So it can or can not cover the table top.
Not sure.

Correct ans. E

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Re: Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 19:50
hi Bunuel shashankism Engr2012

In this Q, had statement 2 been The area of one side of the sheet of glass is 2,400 square inches
then only st 2 would have been sufficient?

Also in original st2, the phrase one side is just meant for confusion, I guess area be L*B . Am I correct?
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Re: Can a certain rectangular sheet of glass be positioned on a   [#permalink] 21 Aug 2017, 19:50

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