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City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short

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City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2011, 08:24
4
10
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

70% (02:05) correct 30% (02:16) wrong based on 961 sessions

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City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have shorter stays and fewer procedures performed than do insured patients, even though insured patients, on average, have slightly less serious medical problems at the time of admission to the hospital than uninsured patients have. Critics of the hospital have concluded that the uninsured patients are most receiving proper medical care. However, this conclusion is almost certainly false. Careful investigation has recently shown two things: insured patients have much longer stays in the hospital than necessary, and they tend to have more procedures performed than are medically necessary.

In the city official’s argument, the two boldface portions play which of the following roles?

(A) The first states the conclusion of the city official’s argument; the second provides support for that conclusion.

(B) The first is used to support the conclusion of the city official’s argument; the second states that conclusion.

(C) The first was used to support the conclusion drawn by hospital critics; the second states the position that the city official’s argument opposes.

(D) The first was used to support the conclusion drawn by hospital critics; the second provides support for the conclusion of the city official’s argument.

(E) The first states the position that the city official’s argument opposes; the second states the conclusion of the city official’s argument

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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2011, 09:23
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A. The first states the argument of the critic, not the official. OUT
B. The first is the critic's conclusion, not a supporting statement. OUT
C. The first is not a supporting statement, it is a conclusion. OUT
D. The first is not a supporting statement, it is a conclusion. OUT
E. The first is the critic's conclusion, which is indeed opposed by the official in the next sentence. The second does in fact state the position of the official, which is that the critic is wrong. CORRECT
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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2011, 22:01
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Easy "E" what is the question?

Critics of the hospital have concluded that the uninsured patients are most receiving proper medical care. -> this is a position. Whose? CRITICS

However, this conclusion is almost certainly false. -> This is a position. Whose? OFFICER

B,C,D gone. E is the answer
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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2011, 08:08
+1 for E.

A beginner Bold face question.

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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2016, 02:41
D. Same as C.
E. CORRECT. This properly states our summary above.
Note: if the argument quotes someone else in its introduction, it is extremely likely that the whole purpose of the argument is to take down that person's quote, or to rebut that person's argument.
That's exactly what happened here: the argument states what the critics have said, and then the argument's main conclusion exists solely to contradict what the critics said.
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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2017, 02:00
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"the uninsured patients are mot receiving proper medical care".

This is the conclusion of the hospital's critics.




"this conclusion is almost certainly false".
This is the conclusion of the city official.


A. The first states the conclusion of the city official's argument; the second provides support for that conclusion. You can eliminate this after the first sentence because the first is the conclusion of the critics not the city official.


B. The first is used to support the conclusion of the city official's argument; the second states that conclusion. Again you can eliminate this after the first sentence because the first is not used to support the city official's argument. The first is actually the critic's conclusion.


C. The first was used to support the conclusion drawn by hospital critics; the second states the position that the city official's argument opposes. The second states the city official's argument, not the argument he opposes. Eliminate this.

D. The first was used to support the conclusion drawn by hospital critics; the second provides support for the conclusion of the city official's argument. The first part is right, but the second certainly does not support the city official's argument because it IS the argument.


E. The first states the position that the city official's argument opposes; the second states the conclusion of the city official's argument. The first is the critic's conclusion and we know the city official opposes this position. Therefore, the first part of this is correct. The second part does in fact state the city official's argument. So this is correct too.

E it is
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City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2019, 12:12
City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have shorter stays and fewer procedures performed than do insured patients, even though insured patients, on average, have slightly less serious medical problems at the time of admission to the hospital than uninsured patients have. Critics of the hospital have concluded that the uninsured patients are most receiving proper medical care. However, this conclusion is almost certainly false. Careful investigation has recently shown two things: insured patients have much longer stays in the hospital than necessary, and they tend to have more procedures performed than are medically necessary.

Hi

While the answer can be determined from the argument as it is given, I suppose the first BF is somewhat weird. Is it really correct? Do the critics really speak about "uninsured patients"? The author opposes the conclusion, but he or she goes on to talk about "insured patients". I aren't sure whether taking that support that address a different group, the author's reasoning stands firm. Or I am missing out something here?

Thanks

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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2019, 14:05
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amod243 wrote:
City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have shorter stays and fewer procedures performed than do insured patients, even though insured patients, on average, have slightly less serious medical problems at the time of admission to the hospital than uninsured patients have. Critics of the hospital have concluded that the uninsured patients are most receiving proper medical care. However, this conclusion is almost certainly false. Careful investigation has recently shown two things: insured patients have much longer stays in the hospital than necessary, and they tend to have more procedures performed than are medically necessary.

In the city official’s argument, the two boldface portions play which of the following roles?

(A) The first states the conclusion of the city official’s argument; the second provides support for that conclusion.

(B) The first is used to support the conclusion of the city official’s argument; the second states that conclusion.

(C) The first was used to support the conclusion drawn by hospital critics; the second states the position that the city official’s argument opposes.

(D) The first was used to support the conclusion drawn by hospital critics; the second provides support for the conclusion of the city official’s argument.

(E) The first states the position that the city official’s argument opposes; the second states the conclusion of the city official’s argument

jawele wrote:
Hi

While the answer can be determined from the argument as it is given, I suppose the first BF is somewhat weird. Is it really correct? Do the critics really speak about "uninsured patients"? The author opposes the conclusion, but he or she goes on to talk about "insured patients". I aren't sure whether taking that support that address a different group, the author's reasoning stands firm. Or I am missing out something here?

Thanks

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You might be overthinking this one... or maybe I just don't fully understand your question? :)

We are told that "critics of the hospital have concluded that the uninsured patients are most receiving proper medical care." This gives us the position of the hospital critics. The author then states, "this conclusion is almost certainly false." So, just from that, we know that the city official opposes the position of the hospital critics.

The city official then provides evidence to support the statement that the conclusion of the hospital critics is almost certainly false: "Careful investigation has recently shown two things: insured patients have much longer stays in the hospital than necessary, and they tend to have more procedures performed than are medically necessary."

The statement that the conclusion of the hospital critics is almost certainly false IS the conclusion of the city official's argument.

I hope that helps!
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Re: City Official: At City Hospital, uninsured patients tend to have short   [#permalink] 29 Jun 2019, 14:05
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