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Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted

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Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2015, 09:03
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Question Stats:

56% (02:15) correct 44% (02:33) wrong based on 451 sessions

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Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted eyeglasses are abnormally prone to depression and hypochondria. Psychological tests given there to hospital patients admitted for physical complaints like heart pain and digestive distress confirmed such a relationship. Perhaps people whose relationship to the world is psychologically painful choose such glasses to reduce visual stimulation, which is perceived as irritating. At any rate, it can be concluded that when such glasses are worn, it is because the wearer has a tendency to be depressed or hypochondriacal.

The argument assumes which one of the following?


(A) Depression is not caused in some cases by an organic condition of the body.

(B) Wearers do not think of the tinted glasses as a means of distancing themselves from other people.

(C) Depression can have many causes, including actual conditions about which it is reasonable for anyone to be depressed.

(D) For hypochondriacs wearing tinted glasses, the glasses serve as a visual signal to others that the wearer’s health is delicate.

(E) The tinting does not dim light to the eye enough to depress the wearer’s mood substantially.
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2015, 15:43
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The conclusion: when you wear tinted glasses, it must be because you're depressed or hypochondriacal. In other words, the depressions causes you to wear the glasses.

Why? Because tests confirmed that folks who wear tinted eyeglasses are especially likely to be depressed and hypochondriacal.

What's the gap? Well, the correlation/causation issue should be jumping out at you here. Just because these two things tend to occur together doesn't mean one causes the other. It could be that the causation is reversed, or something causes both of them.

(E) plays on this issue. Perhaps the glasses cause the depression, not, as the argument concludes, the other way around. Negated, we see that the glasses do cause depression, which does call into question the argument - could we draw that conclusion based on the evidence given if we knew that tinted glasses cause the depression? No.

As for the other answers:

(A) is tempting, as it addresses causation. But it establishes a cause for depression, we're looking at whether we can establish the cause for wearing the glasses.

(B) is out of scope. It's discussing what folks think about wearing glasses - this doesn't affect causation (and if you think it does, you've added in a whole lot of assumptions).

(C) is similar to (A) in that it tempts you with causation, but again, this is addressing why someone would be depressed, not why someone would wear the glasses.

(D) is funny! And perhaps tempting. It seems like a reason for wearing glasses, but the glasses could serve as a signal without that being the reason that the glasses are worn.
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2015, 08:38
souvik101990 i absolutely understand nothing what you said. Can you please elaborate explanation for option E?
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2016, 10:45
Please explain. I marked "A" as the correct answer. I still don't get why is E right.
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2016, 06:06
jaskarn singh wrote:
souvik101990 i absolutely understand nothing what you said. Can you please elaborate explanation for option E?
tarun260189 wrote:
Please explain. I marked "A" as the correct answer. I still don't get why is E right.


The stimulus states -

Wearing tinted eyeglasses (Cause)---->Prone to depression and hypochondria (Effect)

It can be concluded that when such glasses are worn, it is because the wearer has a tendency to be depressed or hypochondriacal. (As given in the Stimulus)

Tendency to be depression/hypochondria(Cause)---->Wearing tinted eyeglasses (Effect)

For assumption question the correct Answer must ( According to PowerScore CR Bible)

1. Eliminates alternate cause of stated events
2. Shows , cause Occurs -----> Effect Occurs
3. Shows , cause doesn't Occur -----> Effect doesn't Occurs
4. Eliminates possibility that the stated relationship can be reversed
5. Shows data used to make casual statement are accurate / eliminates problem with data


Option (E) does just the same ( Eliminates possibility that the stated relationship can be reversed ) hence its the correct answer.
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2018, 21:58
I do not think the actual exam will like this question because the argument structure is not easy to grasp.
conclusion: " such glasses are worn"
premise: "because the wearer has a tendency to be depressed or hypochondriacal."
All other sentences address only the premise.

E eliminates the reverse relationship: conclusion -> premise.
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2018, 00:58
souvik101990 wrote:
The conclusion: when you wear tinted glasses, it must be because you're depressed or hypochondriacal. In other words, the depressions causes you to wear the glasses.

Why? Because tests confirmed that folks who wear tinted eyeglasses are especially likely to be depressed and hypochondriacal.

What's the gap? Well, the correlation/causation issue should be jumping out at you here. Just because these two things tend to occur together doesn't mean one causes the other. It could be that the causation is reversed, or something causes both of them.

(E) plays on this issue. Perhaps the glasses cause the depression, not, as the argument concludes, the other way around. Negated, we see that the glasses do cause depression, which does call into question the argument - could we draw that conclusion based on the evidence given if we knew that tinted glasses cause the depression? No.

As for the other answers:

(A) is tempting, as it addresses causation. But it establishes a cause for depression, we're looking at whether we can establish the cause for wearing the glasses.

(B) is out of scope. It's discussing what folks think about wearing glasses - this doesn't affect causation (and if you think it does, you've added in a whole lot of assumptions).

(C) is similar to (A) in that it tempts you with causation, but again, this is addressing why someone would be depressed, not why someone would wear the glasses.

(D) is funny! And perhaps tempting. It seems like a reason for wearing glasses, but the glasses could serve as a signal without that being the reason that the glasses are worn.


Hi. Am trying to practice elimination and for B, this is how i eliminated it:

1. this does not address the causal relationship.
2. the phrase "distancing themselves" is somehow related to
"Perhaps people whose relationship to the world is psychologically painful choose such glasses to reduce visual stimulation, which is perceived as irritating." .... and this the opinion of the author thus neither a premise nor a conclusion.

therefore, B is rejected.

am i correct?
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2018, 15:46
Very good question and the word "Perhaps" served as the cue to the answer. Perhaps is a cue word to tell the readers that it is an assumption. And therefore Choice E rightly explains the sentence after Perhaps in the passage.
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Re: Doctors in Britain have long suspected that patients who wear tinted &nbs [#permalink] 17 Sep 2018, 15:46
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