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Re: Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
Isn’t the idiom “compare to” not “compare with”??

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Re: Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
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nermeendhuca wrote:
Isn’t the idiom “compare to” not “compare with”??

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Hello, nermeendhuca. Either usage is fine, as this Daily Writing Tips post attests, with references to multiple style guides. In fact, compared with seems more appropriate in the sentence above, since the emphasis may be on the difference or gap between 52 percent and 15 percent.

I hope you enjoy that post. Thank you for posing a question that will shine light on yet another arcane matter in English grammar. It really helps the community.

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Re: Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
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shameekv1989 wrote:
Can Verb-ed modifier "compared" be used in this fashion? Wouldn't it be modifying "college".

I would prefer D even though the sentence is written horribly.

Kindly explain the use of "compared" and what's wrong in D

Shameek -

I hit the jackpot tonight when someone indirectly drew my attention to this post that addresses your question perfectly. Spoiler: it appears as though the Manhattan Prep SC guide lists this very situation as an exception to the general -ed modifier "touch" rule. (I outlined it above in my earlier post, but it is nice to see that MGMAT adopts the same position.)

Happy reading.

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Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
Hello AndrewN sir

I was reading your explanations of verb+ed concept in other posts and was re-directed to this question . Undoubtedly , You have explained well this question.

When I treid to solve this question , my eyes went for Singular/plural splits. I have heard that % can be singular /plural.
% of milk IS xyz
% of cars are uvw
Am I right up to this point?

With the same thought, Do you think i can split on the basis of S/P verb ? Can i reject D and E on similar lines?

Quote:
(A) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent and Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany’s fifteen percent.
(B) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college; in Canada it is thirty-five percent and in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany it is fifteen percent.
(C) In the United States, fifty-two percent of high school graduates go on to college, compared with thirty-five percent in Canada and fifteen percent in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.
(D) The percentage of high school graduates in the United States who go on to college is fifty-two, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent, Great Britain’s fifteen, Japan’s fifteen, and West Germany’s fifteen.
(E) The percentage of United States high school graduates going on to college is fifty-two that in Canada is thirty-five, and that in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany is fifteen.


Did I overthink something? Your suggestions please
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Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
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mSKR wrote:
Hello AndrewN sir

I was reading your explanations of verb+ed concept in other posts and was re-directed to this question . Undoubtedly , You have explained well this question.

When I treid to solve this question , my eyes went for Singular/plural splits. I have heard that % can be singular /plural.
% of milk IS xyz
% of cars are uvw
Am I right up to this point?

With the same thought, Do you think i can split on the basis of S/P verb ? Can i reject D and E on similar lines?

Quote:
(A) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent and Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany’s fifteen percent.
(B) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college; in Canada it is thirty-five percent and in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany it is fifteen percent.
(C) In the United States, fifty-two percent of high school graduates go on to college, compared with thirty-five percent in Canada and fifteen percent in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.
(D) The percentage of high school graduates in the United States who go on to college is fifty-two, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent, Great Britain’s fifteen, Japan’s fifteen, and West Germany’s fifteen.
(E) The percentage of United States high school graduates going on to college is fifty-two that in Canada is thirty-five, and that in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany is fifteen.


Did I overthink something? Your suggestions please

Hello, mSKR. You can certainly create a split between answer choices that opt for a plural agreement and those that go for a singular agreement, but such a split will not lead anywhere on this particular question. Either construct is fine. I agree with what sssanskaar has posted above about articles and subject-verb agreement with certain objects of a preposition. To generalize, you should know by now that in most cases, the noun prior to the preposition—of is biggest offender when subject-verb agreement is being tested—dictates agreement. With certain counting words—e.g., percent, number—the noun ahead of the preposition does not dictate agreement, but the article does instead. Compare:

1) A number of coins are being removed from circulation, since they cost more to mint than their face value.

2) The number of coins being removed from circulation is justifiable, since they cost more to mint than their face value.

The issue is brought to bear in another difficult question I posted on, here. I hope it helps add some clarity to your approach.

Thank you for thinking to ask me about this one.

- Andrew
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Re: Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
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Bunuel wrote:
Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent and Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany’s fifteen percent.


(A) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent and Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany’s fifteen percent.

(B) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college; in Canada it is thirty-five percent and in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany it is fifteen percent.

(C) In the United States, fifty-two percent of high school graduates go on to college, compared with thirty-five percent in Canada and fifteen percent in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.

(D) The percentage of high school graduates in the United States who go on to college is fifty-two, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent, Great Britain’s fifteen, Japan’s fifteen, and West Germany’s fifteen.

(E) The percentage of United States high school graduates going on to college is fifty-two that in Canada is thirty-five, and that in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany is fifteen.


This question is based on Comparisons and Structure.

In Option A, the comparison is not parallel.
When a comparison is made between two possessive forms, the forms must be parallel but they are not in this option. Possession can be conveyed in two ways – by a phrase made up of a noun + preposition + noun or by adding an apostrophe and ‘s’ to a noun.
In this option, the first part of the sentence contains the former form of the possessive but the second part of the sentence contains the latter. Since the two forms are different, there is a lack of parallelism. So, Option A can be eliminated.

In Option B, the reference made by the pronoun ‘it’ is incorrect. Since the pronoun is singular, it refers to the singular noun ‘percent’. However, the comparison is not complete as the sentence is about X percent of college students. The order of comparison is also not parallel - 'fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates' cannot be compared with the phrase "in Canada it is thirty five..." So, Option B can be eliminated.

Option D lacks clarity. The splitting up of the phrase – fifty-two percent of high school graduates – is clumsy. The sentence is also wordy and lacks parallelism in the comparison. so, Option D can be eliminated.

Option E seems to be a run-along sentence. The sentence should have been split after “fifty-two with either a conjunction or semi-colon. The use of the relative pronoun ‘that’ as a comparative word makes the sentence awkward. In this option also, the phrase “fifty-two percent of high school graduates” has been split up. So, Option E can also be eliminated.

In Option C the order of words is not completely parallel - In the United States, fifty-two percent of high school graduates go on to college, compared with thirty-five percent in Canada and fifteen percent in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.
However, the comparison is parallel and this option does not contain clumsy phrasing. Therefore, C is the most appropriate option.

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Re: Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
GMATNinja, KarishmaB Please help with options A,C & D
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Re: Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
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Akhilshah wrote:
GMATNinja, KarishmaB Please help with options A,C & D






Comparison question: We are comparing 52% of US to 35% of Canada and 15% of the other 3.
We like parallelism. It makes things clear - what is being compared with what.

(A) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent and Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany’s fifteen percent.

The comparison with Great Britain and Japan is missing.

Even if it were
52% of US grads go on to college, compared with Canada's 35% and Great Britain's, Japan's and West Germany's 15% - I would still consider this.
It wouldn't be the best parallelism wise (No possessive with US) but better than now.

(B) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college; in Canada it is thirty-five percent and in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany it is fifteen percent.

The moment I read 'it,' I move on from this option. What does 'it' stand for? The sentence does not mention 'the number of high school graduates who go on to college' explicitly. It is not required in a comparison so why would we use it?

(C) In the United States, fifty-two percent of high school graduates go on to college, compared with thirty-five percent in Canada and fifteen percent in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.

It has good parallelism. Essentially, it is
52% high school graduates go on to college in the US, compared with 35% in Canada and 15% in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.

Looks good and clean.

(D) The percentage of high school graduates in the United States who go on to college is fifty-two, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent, Great Britain’s fifteen, Japan’s fifteen, and West Germany’s fifteen.

The percentage in US is 52, compared with Canada's 35%, Great Britain's 15, Japan's 15 and West Germany's 15.

There is no consistency. Somewhere we are giving percentage before the figure and somewhere after the figure and somewhere we are not giving percentage at all, just the figure.

(E) The percentage of United States high school graduates going on to college is fifty-two that in Canada is thirty-five, and that in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany is fifteen.

First of all, how is 'that clause' joined with the previous clause? It doesn't play any role in the previous clause. It is a different clause and should be written separately.
Also, 'that' stands for the noun 'percentage of United States high school graduates going on to college.'
We need to instead say 'The percentage of high school graduates going on to college in US is 52; that in Canada in 35... etc'


Answer (C)
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Re: Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to coll [#permalink]
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