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Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of

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Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2013, 13:08
4
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A
B
C
D
E

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  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

77% (02:00) correct 23% (02:13) wrong based on 536 sessions

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Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

(A) Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

(B) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” he was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

(C) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system.

(D) Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

(E) Now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.


This difficult SC question primarily tests what the OG calls Rhetorical Construction, one of the major areas on the GMAT SC. Of what does this area consist? See this post for more details:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/rhetorical ... orrection/
You will also find there a full explanation of this particular question.

Mike :-)

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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2013, 16:28
mikemcgarry wrote:
Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

(A) Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

(B) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” he was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

(C) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system.

(D) Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

(E) Now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.


This difficult SC question primarily tests what the OG calls Rhetorical Construction, one of the major areas on the GMAT SC. Of what does this area consist? See this post for more details:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/rhetorical ... orrection/
You will also find there a full explanation of this particular question.

Mike :-)

Thanks for the question mike, i didn't see the explanation of this question in your link.

My approach :
when i first read the question, i see lots of modifier. On the 1st read , 1st option look ok. 2nd option is a run-on i don't see any verb for the subject : Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), modifiers....until..blah blha- > Eliminated. C has the same issue, it's just that modifiers have been moved a bit. D looks ok. E has modifier errors such as .., naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, it seems that the day named oxygen and hydrogen. Eliminated.

Now between A and D. On the 2nd read i see parallelism error in A.
(A) Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

Antoine Lavoisier did 2 things :
1)named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen"
2)proved that sulfur was an element

These are not parallel in A. Hence A is Out. If you read D.
Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

This issue is addressed. Hence D.
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New post 30 May 2013, 09:52
mikemcgarry wrote:
Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

(A) Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

(B) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” he was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

(C) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system.

(D) Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

(E) Now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.


This difficult SC question primarily tests what the OG calls Rhetorical Construction, one of the major areas on the GMAT SC. Of what does this area consist? See this post for more details:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/rhetorical ... orrection/
You will also find there a full explanation of this particular question.

Mike :-)


Good question Mike eventhough too layers in a single spot. However, is tough and well conceived.

Each choice has problems regarding or modifier or subject.

C and D are the best but C seems how L naming till now oxygen and bla bla............the context is in the past. D is the best

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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2013, 06:54
Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” who named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

Analysis of the sentence:

Subject: Antonie Lavoisier.
Verb: was raised, educated.
Pronouns: who
Parallel lists: 1) who named both O2 and H2, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to formulation of metric system.
2) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

Modifiers: 1) Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror
2) now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry”

Meaning: This sentence states facts about one Mr. Antonie Lavoisier.

Error analysis: The original sentence has a subject verb pair, pronouns has proper antecedents and parallel lists are properly formed. However, the modifiers are misplaced distorting the meaning of the sentence to mean that-

Antoine Lavoisier was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day because he was Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror. This obviously is wrong!

So lets check the other answer choices:

A has meaning issue so eliminated.

B) Antoine Lavoisier(subject 1) (1743-1794),

naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, (when using verb+ing form the choice wrongly makes us to expect an effect of all these actions, which is wrong)

now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,”- There is no verb for the subject.

he was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror. This means that he was raised and educated until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges. This is nonsensical . Clearly, B can be eliminated.

(C) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system.This choice is a mess, there is no point even in discussing this. Among other issues, there is no subject verb pair Eliminated

(D) Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror. This option rectifies the original sentence by re-positioning the modifiers correctly. This now unambiguously states the facts.Correct

(E) Now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,” Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, naming both “oxygen” and “hydrogen”, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.This choice has parallelism issues as highlighted and also distorts the meaning in the same way as choice B does Eliminated
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Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 20 Oct 2013, 01:14
Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," who named both "oxygen" and "hydrogen", proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

1. Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," who named both "oxygen" and "hydrogen", proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

2. Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), naming both "oxygen" and "hydrogen", proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," he was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

3. Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, naming both "oxygen" and "hydrogen", proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system.

4. Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," named both "oxygen" and "hydrogen", proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

5. Now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, naming both "oxygen" and "hydrogen", proved that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.

This is one of the most difficult question, I have encountered in my entire GMAT preparation.

Now debatable is why is B wrong, they explain that it has double subject.

Their is one free Video from Magoosh as double subject-
https://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3569 ... ed_lessons

Shall we conclude Pronoun is always a double subject?

This is actually Rhetoric question, but their is no such category of rhetoric.
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Originally posted by honchos on 20 Oct 2013, 00:57.
Last edited by honchos on 20 Oct 2013, 01:14, edited 2 times in total.
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New post 20 Oct 2013, 00:59
Are there any one of the analogous capacity of Bunuel(in quantitative) in this Verbal Section?
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New post 20 Oct 2013, 00:59
This is what they Say-

Split #2: double subject. Choice (B) is very awkward in its overall organization, and in addition, we have the structure "Lavoisier …. he was raised" ---- either "Lavoisier" or "he" could be the subject, but they can't both be the subject of the same verb simultaneously. (B) is incorrect.
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New post 20 Oct 2013, 02:49
Just the question is lengthy , Many grammatical mistakes in all options except D.
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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2013, 02:54
abhi398 wrote:
Just the question is lengthy , Many grammatical mistakes in all options except D.



Question is not all lengthy, it is of normal length.

It has a particular GMAT rule used, double subject.
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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2013, 22:38
honchos wrote:
This is what they Say-

Split #2: double subject. Choice (B) is very awkward in its overall organization, and in addition, we have the structure "Lavoisier …. he was raised" ---- either "Lavoisier" or "he" could be the subject, but they can't both be the subject of the same verb simultaneously. (B) is incorrect.



yea, we cant use it as a run on sentence. There is a need of semicolon before "he".

Father of chemistry"; he was raised as a nobleman...
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New post 20 Oct 2013, 23:41
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This is the easiest one I have ever cracked. Its long and lengthy, but easy nevertheless. Except D, the rest of them are all convoluted and have many obvious errors.
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New post 17 Feb 2015, 20:00
Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," who named both oxygen and hydrogen, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.

A) Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," who named both oxygen and hydrogen, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.
B) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), naming both oxygen and hydrogen, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," he was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.
C) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, naming both oxygen and hydrogen, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system.
D) Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," named both oxygen and hydrogen, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.
E) Now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, naming both oxygen and hydrogen, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.
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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Feb 2015, 20:54
A) Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," who named both oxygen and hydrogen, proved that sulfur was an element, contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day.
was at the two places does not follow parallelism

B) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), naming both oxygen and hydrogen, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," he was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.
ing form not proper.[color=#0000ff] now universally....not modifying the modifier correctly[/color]

C) Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror, naming both oxygen and hydrogen, proving that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system.
same error as B
D) Raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," named both oxygen and hydrogen, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until he was guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.
correct in parallelism and modifiers
E) Now universally recognized as the "Father of Chemistry," Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was raised as a nobleman and educated in the leading scientific theories of his day, naming both oxygen and hydrogen, proved that sulfur was an element, and contributing to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system, until guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of the Reign of Terror.problem of parallelism

ans D
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New post 19 Feb 2015, 10:36
Agree that D is correct but isn't comma before "and contributed to" incorrect??

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 11:41
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rajthakkar wrote:
Agree that D is correct but isn't comma before "and contributed to" incorrect??

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Dear rajthakkar,
My friend, that comma is sometimes called the "Oxford comma": the comma in a list after the penultimate item and before the word "and."
J, K, L, and M
The Oxford comma is optional but is almost always used in sophisticated writing. In this vein, the GMAT almost always use the Oxford comma in a list. It's one little indication of high quality writing.

The list can be any items in parallel. In this rather long sentence, we have three verbs in parallel. Think about a simpler example of three verbs in parallel.
Yesterday, I shopped, ate out, and went dancing.
Three verbs in parallel, and in the position after the second verb phrase "ate out" and before the "and," we have the Oxford comma.

The sentence about Lavoisier is much longer, but this is the basic structure of (D): three verb phrases in parallel.
.... Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794), now universally recognized as the “Father of Chemistry,”
\\ named both “oxygen” and “hydrogen,"
\\ proved that sulfur was an element,
and
\\contributed to the formulation of what we now know as the metric system,
until he was ...

The comma after the word "element" and before "and" is simply the Oxford comma, following the penultimate item on a list in parallel.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 22:37
Dear mike,
I am non-native so I was not so aware about oxford comma.
Moreover I got a sentence correction incorrect in MGMAT cat test where there was a comma before and.As far as I remember it was written that comma before and separates the part after comma .

May be I overlooked some info in that question

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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2018, 16:09

Official Explanation


These long sentences with the whole sentence underlined are particularly hard. Incidentally, Lavoisier was a truly great scientist!

Split #1: Rhetorical organization. The elements of this sentence tell the biographical details of a particular individual. While it's not a strict rule, it would make more sense for the events to unfold more or less in chronological order. We could make an exception if there were some clear reason to highlight some particular event or some logic that demanded an alternate order, but this sentence provides us with no such rationale. In this respect, notice that (A) is a disaster, a completely cockamamie sentence that narrates events in reverse chronological order. Sentence (A) is not far from fully grammatically correct -- perhaps missing an "and" to clarify the parallelism -- but it is rhetorically completely unacceptable, both because of the bizarre order, and because the subject and the verb are ridiculously far apart. (A) is incorrect.

In this respect, (D) does a particular good job of presenting events in chronological order. At this point, we will simply notice this and set it aside.

Split #2: double subject. Choice (B) is very awkward in its overall organization, and in addition, we have the structure "Lavoisier …. he was raised" ---- either "Lavoisier" or "he" could be the subject, but they can't both be the subject of the same verb simultaneously. (B) is incorrect.

Split #3: missing verb. In choice (C), the subject "Lavoisier" has no verb in this choice. (C) is incorrect.

Split #4: parallelism problem. In choice (E), we have "naming …. proved …. contributing", a clear failure of parallelism. (E) is incorrect.

For all these reasons, the best answer is (D).
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Re: Guillotined on highly questionable charges at the height of &nbs [#permalink] 06 Sep 2018, 16:09
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