GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 20 Jan 2020, 05:06

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

In his classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 13 Apr 2019
Posts: 179
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Operations
GMAT 1: 690 Q49 V35
GPA: 3.5
WE: General Management (Retail)
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
In his classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 19 Sep 2019, 14:26
12
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

40% (01:00) correct 61% (01:05) wrong based on 200 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

In his classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, author George Orwell depicts a society ruled by oligarchic dictatorship so draconian as to suppress any individual who refuses to subordinate to the state.

A) so draconian as to suppress
B) so draconian it suppressed
C) so draconian that it suppressed
D) draconian enough to suppress
E) draconian enough so as to suppress

Originally posted by azhrhasan on 19 Sep 2019, 05:26.
Last edited by generis on 19 Sep 2019, 14:26, edited 3 times in total.
Edited and formatted the question.
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 3734
In his classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2019, 14:25
azhrhasan wrote:
In his classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, author George Orwell depicts a society ruled by oligarchic dictatorship so draconian as to suppress any individual who refuses to subordinate to the state

A) so draconian as to suppress
B) so draconian [THAT] it suppressed
C) so draconian that it suppressed [wrong verb tense]
D) draconian enough to suppress
E) draconian enough so as to suppress


• CONCEPTS

Meaning?
The government in George Orwell's book 1984 is a dictatorship.
The dictators are excessively harsh (draconian)—so harsh that any person who resists the government is silenced (suppressed).

Idioms?
When the extreme degree of a characteristic of something results in something else, GMAC uses two similar idioms.
(1) So X as to Y
-- He was so grateful for the kindness as to be moved to tears.
(2) So X that Y
-- He was so grateful for the kindness that he wept.

This sentence describes an extreme cause and effect situation.
Options A, B, and C hint that an idiom is at issue. ("So . . .")

PROCESS OF ELIMINATION (explanation and analysis are below POE)

• Split #1: Incorrect idiom
The correct idioms are So X as to Y, and So X that Y.

Option B incorrectly uses So X it Y.
-- if you have to choose between so and so that in a question that involves consequence, use so that.
-- the word so by itself (without that) is rarely correct on the GMAT
Eliminate B

• Split #2 - verb tense mismatch

In the non-underlined portion of the sentence, we have the present tense verbs depicts and refuses.
In option C, suppressed should be suppresses.

Most of the time, the verb tense in reported speech is "shifted" one tense back from what the tense would be in direct speech.
But if the reporting verb (depicts) is in the present tense as it is in this sentence, we do not have to "backshift."

Option (C) would be fine if the verb tense were correct.
That is, the idiom is correct. The verb tense is not.

(C) a society ruled by oligarchic dictatorship so draconian that it suppressed any individual who refuses to subordinate to the state
Eliminate C

• Split #3: meaning and idioms

Enough to is not quite the right meaning.
Enough suggests reaching a minimum, or reaching a threshold, whereas this sentence and the correct idioms emphasize the extreme degree of something and its results.

So = extreme
Enough = sufficient

So X as to Y
The professor's grading was so unfair as to outrage every single student.
→ The professor's grading was extremely unfair.
→ The professor's grading was very unfair.
The emphasis is on the extreme degree of unfairness.

The professor's grading was harsh enough to give pampered students a reality check.
The professor's grading is not extremely harsh.
Its harshness is sufficient (enough) to teach students a lesson.

The meaning of Options D and E is not correct.

-- The regime was not trying to meet a threshold of harshness, at which point insubordinate people would be punished.
The regime was not trying to be "sufficiently" harsh.
The regime was well past that threshold.
It was extremely harsh, as opposed to "just harsh enough."
-- In addition, (E) uses yet another idiom that doesn't work here (so as to) and scrambles it with "enough to."
-- so as to (with the words all together, in one phrasal piece) is an idiom different from So X as to Y.
So as to indicates purpose. GMAT does not like this idiom. I cannot find even one question in which the correct answer includes so as to.
Eliminate D and E

The answer is A.

SPOILER ALERT: If you click on the link, the answer to an official question is revealed.
Here is one official question whose correct answer uses the idiom So X as to Y.


• ANALYSIS (ignore what follows if you understood everything)

• The correct idioms are
So X as to Y
and
So X that Y

Structure?
So [adjective/adverb] as to
So [adjective/adverb] that

• In these idioms, "so" emphasizes the degree of the adjective (or much less frequently, the adverb).*

The words "as to" and "that" follow X's characteristic and tell us what results from the intensity of the adjective.

The oil painting was so realistic as to be mistaken for a photograph.
-- realistic is the adjective. Cause? A painting is very realistic. Result? The painting is mistaken for a photograph.

The professor was so grouchy that he intimidated students.
-- grouchy is the adjective. The professor is very grouchy. What is the result of his being very grouchy? He intimidates students.
His grouchiness causes the students to feel intimidated.

Both idioms are acceptable in this question. Option C botches the verb.
Option A does not.

The answer is A
_________________
SC Butler has resumed! Get two SC questions to practice, whose links you can find by date, here.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has -- Margaret Mead
GMAT Club Bot
In his classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four   [#permalink] 19 Sep 2019, 14:25
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In his classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne