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In order to cut down on construction costs, the building

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In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2017, 08:18
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61% (01:30) correct 39% (01:15) wrong based on 139 sessions

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In order to cut down on construction costs, the building contractor has proposed to use a new, cheaper alternative to the originally proposed sealant. Critics in the company have charged that this practice could severely pose a safety risk to buildings constructed with this mixture. However, the contractor has responded that buildings built with the new alternative material can withstand up to ten tonnes of load per story and no residential building has that kind of load. Thus, there is no safety risk.

The contractor’s response to critics of the proposal is based on which one of the following assumptions?

A. Residents would be made to know the composition of building material when they decide to buy property.
B. The alternative material has the same chemical and physical characteristics as those of the originally proposed sealant.
C. Buildings built with the alternative material have been found to be safe in a recent audit performed by the state government.
D. The strength of the proposed alternative has similar longevity as that of the originally proposed sealant.
E. The load faced by residential constructions is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to cross ten tonnes over the next few years.

Source: Experts Global
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2017, 08:33
A is not relevant.
B,D: if alternative material has same characteristics as those of present material then there is no need to use alternative material.
E: If load will be more than there is no need to use alternative material.
C should be answer.

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2017, 08:42
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broall wrote:
In order to cut down on construction costs, the building contractor has proposed to use a new, cheaper alternative to the originally proposed sealant. Critics in the company have charged that this practice could severely pose a safety risk to buildings constructed with this mixture. However, the contractor has responded that buildings built with the new alternative material can withstand up to ten tonnes of load per story and no residential building has that kind of load. Thus, there is no safety risk.

The contractor’s response to critics of the proposal is based on which one of the following assumptions?

A. Residents would be made to know the composition of building material when they decide to buy property.
B. The alternative material has the same chemical and physical characteristics as those of the originally proposed sealant.
C. Buildings built with the alternative material have been found to be safe in a recent audit performed by the state government.
D. The strength of the proposed alternative has similar longevity as that of the originally proposed sealant.
E. The load faced by residential constructions is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to cross ten tonnes over the next few years.

Source: Experts Global


Hi..

Clearly D is the best answer in the given choices.

What should we look for into the choice..
The contractor is talking of same safety features as the existing coolant. So we look at the choice that would support his claim and without which the safety can be questionable.
D talks of one of the factor of safety- longevity.
He believes or assumes that the strength may be same today and would also continue to be that way for the same period as the existing sealant.

If this is not true then the safety risks would be there and his claim would fall flat.

D
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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 10:43
The contractor concludes that there is no safety risks and he provides evidence that buildings that have been constructed using the alternative have been able to bear 10 tonnes of load per story.
We have to find an assumption which must be true for the contractor's conclusion to hold.

A. Residents would be made to know the composition of building material when they decide to buy property.
irrelevant

B. The alternative material has the same chemical and physical characteristics as those of the originally proposed sealant.
It is not a must be assumption. The properties need not be same.

C. Buildings built with the alternative material have been found to be safe in a recent audit performed by the state government.
Okay. Its good to have a clearance from the government audit but that does not necessarily have to be true for the contractor's conclusion.

D. The strength of the proposed alternative has similar longevity as that of the originally proposed sealant.
Yes. The contractor has to assume that the strength of the alternative has same longevity as that of original sealant.
If we negate it, then the strength can be lesser and that can be a safety risk. Hence it is a must be true assumption.

E. The load faced by residential constructions is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to cross ten tonnes over the next few years.
This one rather weakens the conclusion. If the load is increasing then the 10 tonnes of load might not be sufficient.

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 11:42
D
The contractor assumes that the original and alternate sealants both have identical life, hence the new material is as safe to use as its predecessor considering the fact that the new material can withstand loads beyond the safe limit of residential buildings.

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 12:56
chetan2u wrote:
broall wrote:
In order to cut down on construction costs, the building contractor has proposed to use a new, cheaper alternative to the originally proposed sealant. Critics in the company have charged that this practice could severely pose a safety risk to buildings constructed with this mixture. However, the contractor has responded that buildings built with the new alternative material can withstand up to ten tonnes of load per story and no residential building has that kind of load. Thus, there is no safety risk.

The contractor’s response to critics of the proposal is based on which one of the following assumptions?

A. Residents would be made to know the composition of building material when they decide to buy property.
B. The alternative material has the same chemical and physical characteristics as those of the originally proposed sealant.
C. Buildings built with the alternative material have been found to be safe in a recent audit performed by the state government.
D. The strength of the proposed alternative has similar longevity as that of the originally proposed sealant.
E. The load faced by residential constructions is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to cross ten tonnes over the next few years.

Source: Experts Global


Hi..

Clearly D is the best answer in the given choices.

What should we look for into the choice..
The contractor is talking of same safety features as the existing coolant. So we look at the choice that would support his claim and without which the safety can be questionable.
D talks of one of the factor of safety- longevity.
He believes or assumes that the strength may be same today and would also continue to be that way for the same period as the existing sealant.

If this is not true then the safety risks would be there and his claim would fall flat.

D


Hi,
I have a doubt. If the strength of new material and existing material is same then why should use of new material is required.
In that case D will weak the argument. How it could be an assumption?

Please explain.

Thanks.

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 18:28
the answer is E because D talks about the similarity and being similar is not equal to being same . This is in fact GMAT one of the traps in the CR answer choices

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 23:30
broall wrote:
In order to cut down on construction costs, the building contractor has proposed to use a new, cheaper alternative to the originally proposed sealant. Critics in the company have charged that this practice could severely pose a safety risk to buildings constructed with this mixture. However, the contractor has responded that buildings built with the new alternative material can withstand up to ten tonnes of load per story and no residential building has that kind of load. Thus, there is no safety risk.

The contractor’s response to critics of the proposal is based on which one of the following assumptions?

A. Residents would be made to know the composition of building material when they decide to buy property.
B. The alternative material has the same chemical and physical characteristics as those of the originally proposed sealant.
C. Buildings built with the alternative material have been found to be safe in a recent audit performed by the state government.
D. The strength of the proposed alternative has similar longevity as that of the originally proposed sealant.
E. The load faced by residential constructions is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to cross ten tonnes over the next few years.

Source: Experts Global


I think the answer B.

The conclusion is that there is no safety risk. If the material cannot withstand the load under the same conditions then there is a risk. The contractor only discusses the load factor making an assumption about other factors in the conclusion that there is no risk.
However D is a close competitor.

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2017, 11:53
Expert,

I have one query, if I apply negation test on option d, then it comes out to be.. longevity will not be similar so it can be more than or less than the longevity of old material.

If it is more than ...than it will not shatter the conclusion.but of it is less than it will completely shatter.

So if it is the situation, can it be the answer?

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Re: In order to cut down on construction costs, the building   [#permalink] 10 Sep 2017, 11:53
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