It is currently 13 Dec 2017, 03:27

Decision(s) Day!:

CHAT Rooms | Ross R1 | Kellogg R1 | Darden R1 | Tepper R1


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Many of the students at the International School speak

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 06 Feb 2010
Posts: 166

Kudos [?]: 1455 [1], given: 182

Concentration: Marketing, Leadership
Schools: University of Dhaka - Class of 2010
GPA: 3.63
WE: Business Development (Consumer Products)
Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2013, 07:41
1
This post received
KUDOS
8
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

60% (01:56) correct 40% (02:01) wrong based on 301 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Many of the students at the International School speak French or German or both. Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't. In addition, 1/6 of the students who don't speak German do speak French. What fraction of the students speak German?

(1) Exactly 60 students speak French and German.
(2) Exactly 75 students speak neither French nor German.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

Practice Makes a Man Perfect. Practice. Practice. Practice......Perfectly

Critical Reasoning: http://gmatclub.com/forum/best-critical-reasoning-shortcuts-notes-tips-91280.html

Collections of MGMAT CAT: http://gmatclub.com/forum/collections-of-mgmat-cat-math-152750.html

MGMAT SC SUMMARY: http://gmatclub.com/forum/mgmat-sc-summary-of-fourth-edition-152753.html

Sentence Correction: http://gmatclub.com/forum/sentence-correction-strategies-and-notes-91218.html

Arithmatic & Algebra: http://gmatclub.com/forum/arithmatic-algebra-93678.html

Helpful Geometry formula sheet: http://gmatclub.com/forum/best-geometry-93676.html


I hope these will help to understand the basic concepts & strategies. Please Click ON KUDOS Button.

Kudos [?]: 1455 [1], given: 182

Expert Post
3 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4550

Kudos [?]: 8949 [3], given: 111

Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2013, 15:41
3
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
monirjewel wrote:
Many of the students at the International School speak French or German or both. Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't. In addition, 1/6 of the students who don't speak German do speak French. What fraction of the students speak German?
(1) Exactly 60 students speak French and German.
(2) Exactly 75 students speak neither French nor German.

Dear monirjewel,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

First of all, here's an article about DS questions:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-data- ... ency-tips/

Let's say
F = French only speakers
G = German only speakers
B = speak both
N = speaker neither
Four unknowns.
F + G + B + N = the total population of students.

Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't
--> B = 4*F

1/6 of the students who don't speak German do speak French
students who don't speak German = F + N
1/6 of those are F, so N = 5*F
We have two equations from the prompt that we can use with either statement.

Statement #1: Exactly 60 students speak French and German.
B = 60
Therefore, F = 15
Therefore, N = 75
We have no way of calculating the value of G, so this statement, alone and by itself, is insufficient.

Statement #2: Exactly 75 students speak neither French nor German.
N = 75.
Therefore, F = 15
Therefore, B = 60
Again, no way of calculating G. This statement, alone and by itself, is insufficient.

Combined:
Even when we combine this information, we will have no way to calculate G, so no way to answer the question. Everything together is still insufficient.
Answer = (E)

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Kudos [?]: 8949 [3], given: 111

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 131

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 368

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Mar 2014, 19:03
mikemcgarry wrote:
monirjewel wrote:
Many of the students at the International School speak French or German or both. Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't. In addition, 1/6 of the students who don't speak German do speak French. What fraction of the students speak German?
(1) Exactly 60 students speak French and German.
(2) Exactly 75 students speak neither French nor German.

Dear monirjewel,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

First of all, here's an article about DS questions:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-data- ... ency-tips/

Let's say
F = French only speakers
G = German only speakers
B = speak both
N = speaker neither
Four unknowns.
F + G + B + N = the total population of students.

Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't
--> B = 4*F

1/6 of the students who don't speak German do speak French
students who don't speak German = F + N
1/6 of those are F, so N = 5*F
We have two equations from the prompt that we can use with either statement.

Statement #1: Exactly 60 students speak French and German.
B = 60
Therefore, F = 15
Therefore, N = 75
We have no way of calculating the value of G, so this statement, alone and by itself, is insufficient.

Statement #2: Exactly 75 students speak neither French nor German.
N = 75.
Therefore, F = 15
Therefore, B = 60
Again, no way of calculating G. This statement, alone and by itself, is insufficient.

Combined:
Even when we combine this information, we will have no way to calculate G, so no way to answer the question. Everything together is still insufficient.
Answer = (E)

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike
Can you please explain this line to me "Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't"
_________________

Feel Free to Press Kudos if you like the way I think :).

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 368

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4550

Kudos [?]: 8949 [1], given: 111

Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Mar 2014, 13:19
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
282552 wrote:
Hi Mike
Can you please explain this line to me "Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't"

Dear 282552,
Yes, I am happy to help.

We can divide all students who speak French into two groups
Group A = those who speak French and who also speak German
Group B = those who speak French but who do not speak German
(Group A) + (Group B) = all students who speak French. The sentence says that (Group A) is four times bigger than (Group B). That's the meaning.

While I wasn't intending this, this is actually a sophisticated SC structure, an instance of common words dropped in parallelism. For a discussion of this topic, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/dropping-c ... -the-gmat/
Here's the sentence again with the common word included:
Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't speak German.
That's the end of the sentence.

The idiom at the beginning is also tricky --- "among [group], X is more/less/etc. than Y." By beginning with "among [group]", we are saying that we are confining our statement only to members of that group.
Among Democrats, women outnumber men.
Among universities in California, Stanford has the best reputation.

When the sentence begins, "among the students who speak French," we are saying that we are going to consider all French-speaking students as a single group, and completely ignore all the students who don't speak French. Inside this category of all French-speaking students, we are comparing German-speakers to non-German-speakers.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Kudos [?]: 8949 [1], given: 111

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 131

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 368

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Mar 2014, 17:58
mikemcgarry wrote:
282552 wrote:
Hi Mike
Can you please explain this line to me "Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't"

Dear 282552,
Yes, I am happy to help.

We can divide all students who speak French into two groups
Group A = those who speak French and who also speak German
Group B = those who speak French but who do not speak German
(Group A) + (Group B) = all students who speak French. The sentence says that (Group A) is four times bigger than (Group B). That's the meaning.

While I wasn't intending this, this is actually a sophisticated SC structure, an instance of common words dropped in parallelism. For a discussion of this topic, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/dropping-c ... -the-gmat/
Here's the sentence again with the common word included:
Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't speak German.
That's the end of the sentence.

The idiom at the beginning is also tricky --- "among [group], X is more/less/etc. than Y." By beginning with "among [group]", we are saying that we are confining our statement only to members of that group.
Among Democrats, women outnumber men.
Among universities in California, Stanford has the best reputation.

When the sentence begins, "among the students who speak French," we are saying that we are going to consider all French-speaking students as a single group, and completely ignore all the students who don't speak French. Inside this category of all French-speaking students, we are comparing German-speakers to non-German-speakers.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

Thanks Mike
Nicely explained.
It does make sense now!!
_________________

Feel Free to Press Kudos if you like the way I think :).

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 368

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 46

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 76

GPA: 3.6
WE: Operations (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Aug 2016, 03:22
Hi mikemcgarry
Please explain the meaning of "four times as many speak German as don't".
The meaning I get from this in mathematical form using same variables as above -
4* as many speak German (B)= who don't speak German (F).
please explain as I am totally confused.

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 76

Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4550

Kudos [?]: 8949 [0], given: 111

Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Aug 2016, 15:13
gauravsaggis1 wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry
Please explain the meaning of "four times as many speak German as don't".
The meaning I get from this in mathematical form using same variables as above -
4* as many speak German (B)= who don't speak German (F).
please explain as I am totally confused.

Dear gauravsaggis1,
I'm happy to respond. :-) My friend, I believe you understand this correctly.

First of all, grammatically, this phrase omits words in the second branch of the parallelism. See this blog article:
Dropping Common Words in Parallel on the GMAT
This is always a particularly confusing issue for non-native speakers. Here's the phrase with all the common words retained
... four times as many students speak German as the students who don't speak German ...
On the GMAT SC, you have to be able to read the green words and understand the presence of the other words.

Now, the mathematics, which I believe you understand. As above,
B = students who speak both French and German
F = students who speak just French, and not German.
The problem says:
"Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't."
The phrase "Among the students who speak French" means, for the purposes of that sentence, we are going to consider only that group of people. We would paraphrase this in colloquial languages as "just looking at the students who speak French" or "considering only the students who speak French."
For example, I might say:
Among US cities, New York City is the largest.
Clearly, NYC is not the largest city on the planet, but that's not what this sentence is saying. We are merely making the comparison to other US cities. Much in the same way, this sentence from the problem is considering only the students who speak French: these students are divided into two groups, B and F. Among French speaking students, the students in B speak German and the students in F don't speak German. This entire sentence is merely saying that B = 4*F.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Kudos [?]: 8949 [0], given: 111

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 46

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 76

GPA: 3.6
WE: Operations (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2016, 02:16
@mikemcgarry,Thanks for reply but, my question still remains the same. with which part will 4 be multiplied?
I have multiplied it with B whereas you have multiplied it with F. This is the part where I am confused.

Thanks in Advance.

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 76

Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4550

Kudos [?]: 8949 [0], given: 111

Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Aug 2016, 10:06
gauravsaggis1 wrote:
@mikemcgarry,Thanks for reply but, my question still remains the same. with which part will 4 be multiplied?
I have multiplied it with B whereas you have multiplied it with F. This is the part where I am confused.

Thanks in Advance.

Dear gauravsaggis1,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

I'm going to recommend this blog
Intro to GMAT Word Problems, Part 1: Translating from Word to Math

The basic idea that is that the "to be" verb, "is" or "are," is the mathematical equivalent of the equal sign. Thus
X is four times Y
means X = 4Y.

Now what's tricky about this problem is that it uses a more sophisticated grammatical construction similar to an appositive phrase. This is another grammatical way to show that two things are the same:
Julius Caesar, the great Roman general, conquered Gaul.
Among other things, we are saying that Julius Caesar WAS a great Roman general. This is a grammatical way to show "is" without writing "is." Thus, this is an alternate way to indicate the presence of the equal sign.

If the problem says
X is an important number, four times greater than Y, ....
that's a true appositive phrase. Grammatically, we are saying
X is an important number AND X IS four times greater than Y ....
and this means mathematically that X = 4Y.

Now, look at that sentence in the problem:
Among the students who speak French, four times as many speak German as don't.
This is an extremely compact and elegant phrasing, typically of the fine question craftsmanship of MGMAT. The construction is in some ways analogous to an appositive phrase. Let's write a much more sloppy expanded version of this same sentence.
Looking at all the students who speak French, the French speakers who speak German are four time as many as those who don't speak German.
Now, look where the "are" is in the sentence: that's the equal sign. Thus
(French speakers who speak German) = 4*(French speakers who don't speak German)

You always have to find the implicit "is" --- that's where the equal sign goes.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Kudos [?]: 8949 [0], given: 111

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 09 Sep 2013
Posts: 14877

Kudos [?]: 287 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: Many of the students at the International School speak [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Nov 2017, 21:47
Hello from the GMAT Club BumpBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

GMAT Books | GMAT Club Tests | Best Prices on GMAT Courses | GMAT Mobile App | Math Resources | Verbal Resources

Kudos [?]: 287 [0], given: 0

Re: Many of the students at the International School speak   [#permalink] 10 Nov 2017, 21:47
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Many of the students at the International School speak

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.