GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 16 Nov 2018, 14:47

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Strategy Webinar

     November 17, 2018

     November 17, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Nov. 17, 7 AM PST. Aiming to score 760+? Attend this FREE session to learn how to Define your GMAT Strategy, Create your Study Plan and Master the Core Skills to excel on the GMAT.
  • GMATbuster's Weekly GMAT Quant Quiz # 9

     November 17, 2018

     November 17, 2018

     09:00 AM PST

     11:00 AM PST

    Join the Quiz Saturday November 17th, 9 AM PST. The Quiz will last approximately 2 hours. Make sure you are on time or you will be at a disadvantage.

More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 17 Jul 2008
Posts: 205
More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jun 2009, 07:01
35
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

56% (00:58) correct 44% (01:11) wrong based on 1118 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mystreiously from one necklace to some other

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/10/16/weekinreview/the-science-corps-wants-a-few-more-good-heretics.html

Dr. McClintock, a gentle heretic for most of her 81 years, reported some 30 years ago that genes, the tiny beads of genetic information in each cell, can ''jump,'' like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another. At the time, her peers greeted that revolutionary idea with stony silence. Last week, however, the Nobel committee hailed it as the product of ''great ingenuity and intellectual stringency,'' a discovery that has aided biomedical research and helped explain the great genetic variability found in nature.

_________________

Please give kudos if you enjoy the explanations that I have given. Thanks :)

Most Helpful Expert Reply
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4488
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Sep 2012, 22:19
10
6
rohansherry wrote:
126. More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can
"jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one


I am responding to a p.m. from venmic, vvho vvrote: "The correct ansvver to this one is C not B." I am sorry to differ, but the correct ansvver is B

Idea #1
"like" is used for nouns only, to compare a noun to a noun
"as" introduces a full clause, that must have a full noun + verb structure
See these blog post:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... ike-vs-as/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... omparison/

Idea #2
DO NOT confuse a [noun + participle] structure for a full [noun + verb] structure. This is a very common mistake, the GMAT loves to catch folks in it.
A participle is a verb form, but it's not acting as a verb in the sentence --- rather, it's acting as a noun modifier.
See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/participle ... -the-gmat/

The phrase "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is not a full [noun + verb] clause --- it would not stand on it's own as a sentence. Rather, it's simply a noun plus a long noun modifier. All we have is the noun and stuff decorating the noun, so "as" is incorrect, and "like" is correct. That's why (A) is wrong and (B) is right.

Once we have the words "pearls do", that's a noun + verb, a clause all on its own --- then "like" is wrong: this is why (D) is wrong. Choices (C) & (E) have the correct word "as" followed by a full clause --- they avoid the "as"/"like" mistake. BUT, (C) & (E) are wordier, less polished, less elegant, more awkward. (B) is much more sleek and efficient, which makes (B) the correct answer.

Does all that make sense?

Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Aug 2009
Posts: 155
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Nov 2009, 09:05
7
5
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
AS PEARLS MOVE would have been a correct usage of AS
but here a noun PEARLS is being compared to GENES and hence LIKE is correct
MOVING MYSTERIOUSLY FROM .... participle phrase for an analogy of the way the genes move around
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
CORRECT
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
AS PEARLS DO is correct but THAT is incorrect because THAT cannot restrict
the action DO of pearls
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
LIKE PEARLS DO is incorrect since LIKE cannot modify a clause "pearls do"
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one

AS has to be followed by the noun/pronoun performing the clause
General Discussion
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
G
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2743
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 May 2012, 12:00
3
6
Hi All,

More than 30 years ago Dr, Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can “jump”, as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

Image

“Like” and “As”, both are used to convey comparison is a sentence. However, there is a difference between their usages. “Like” is always followed only by a “noun” or a “pronoun” whereas “As” is always followed by a “clause”.

Going by this rule, the original sentence is incorrect because here “as” is not followed by a clause. This error can be rectified either by placing a clause after “as” or by replacing “as” with “like”.

POE:

Choice A: as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another. Incorrect for the reason stated above.

Choice B: like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another. Correct.

Choice C: as pearls do that move from one necklace to others. Incorrect. Firstly, “that” is relative pronoun that modifies a noun. So “that” should touch the noun it modifies. But in this choice, “that” is away. Also, the use of “others” is not correct here. The intended meaning is that pearls move from necklace to another necklace. Using “others” make it ambiguous as to where the pearls move to.

Choice D: like pearls do that move from one necklace to others. Incorrect. Apart from repeating the “that” and “others” errors of choice C, this choice has another error. “like” has been followed by a clause here.

Choice E: as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one. Incorrect. This sentence distorts the meaning of the sentence. By using the modifier "that move" and verb "do" for pearls, it appears that pearls to two actions - pearls jump and by the way these pearls also move mysteriously...This is not the intended meaning. The author actually wants to say that genes jump like the pearls. And then he describes the manner in which these pearls jump - by moving mysteriously.

Image

1. “Like” is followed by a noun and “as” is followed by a clause.
2. Be careful of any change in words that appear in the original sentence.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 150
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2012, 05:34
2
I do have a question whether we are comparing genes with pearls or we are comparing the action of jumping
of genes with action of pearls movement.
_________________

If u can't jump the 700 wall , drill a big hole and cross it .. I can and I WILL DO IT ...need some encouragement and inspirations from U ALL

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4488
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2012, 09:43
1
1
sujit2k7 wrote:
I do have a question whether we are comparing genes with pearls or we are comparing the action of jumping
of genes with action of pearls movement.


It's funny --- that question doesn't have a clear precise mathematical answer. In the big picture, in the overall logic of the sentence and of the larger argument, we are drawing an analogy between genes jumping and pearls moving, between the two actions, but when we use the construction "...like pearls ...", as in the correct answer (B), then the literal grammatical comparison is between genes and pearls, the two nouns.

Does that make sense?

Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Far, far away!
Joined: 02 Sep 2012
Posts: 1073
Location: Italy
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.8
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Jul 2013, 02:39
1
as-vs-like-correct-and-incorrect-usages-133950.html

To state comparisons:
LIKE + NOUN
AS + CLAUSE


More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can “jump,” as
pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.


A. as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
B. like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
C. as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
D. like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
E. as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one

Than you can eliminate C and E because they are unidiomatic.
one necklace to another
one necklace to others
_________________

It is beyond a doubt that all our knowledge that begins with experience.

Kant , Critique of Pure Reason

Tips and tricks: Inequalities , Mixture | Review: MGMAT workshop
Strategy: SmartGMAT v1.0 | Questions: Verbal challenge SC I-II- CR New SC set out !! , My Quant

Rules for Posting in the Verbal Forum - Rules for Posting in the Quant Forum[/size][/color][/b]

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jun 2012
Posts: 73
Schools: IIMA
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 May 2014, 08:45
2
1
(A) "as" requires a clause after it. A clause requires a verb, but we don't have one here. "moving" is a participle (i.e. a type of adjective).
(B) CORRECT!
(C) This answer choice does use "as" correctly. Unfortunately, the word "that" is a relative pronoun, and it modifies whatever it touches. In this case, it's touching a verb ("do"), which it cannot modify. "One necklace to others" is slightly weird; a single pearl can't move to multiple necklaces at once.
(D) "like" cannot have a clause after it. The word "do" signals this as a clause, so the "like" is wrong.
(E) This answer choice does use "as" correctly. However, it makes a meaning error. This implies that pearls actually move from one necklace to another, which they don't. Also, "one necklace to some other one" is awkward
_________________

If you are not over prepared then you are under prepared !!!

VP
VP
User avatar
V
Status: It's near - I can see.
Joined: 13 Apr 2013
Posts: 1291
Location: India
Concentration: International Business, Operations
GMAT 1: 480 Q38 V22
GPA: 3.01
WE: Engineering (Consulting)
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2018, 04:40
perfectstranger wrote:
More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.


(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another

(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another

(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others

(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others

(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other

It's B. Like used for comparing nouns.
_________________

"Do not watch clock; Do what it does. KEEP GOING."

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Status: Applying
Joined: 24 Oct 2017
Posts: 26
Location: India
WE: Investment Banking (Investment Banking)
CAT Tests
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 May 2018, 23:47
GMATNinja Hey! Can you please explain why each of the four options is incorrect?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Feb 2018
Posts: 379
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 May 2018, 07:20
Here two nouns are not actually compared but correlated. As per my knowledge correlation is depicted by "like" to bring out a relation or similarity between two nouns. Genes like pearls...

B is the correct choice.

Sent from my Lenovo K53a48 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2018, 02:42
perfectstranger wrote:
More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one [color=#ed1c24][color=#9e0039]necklace to others[/color][/color]
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mystreiously from one necklace to some other


A : Do is missing
B: Another is correct: From one (Singular) to Another (for singular )...to maintain From..To idiom
C,D,& E : Idiom error.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2093
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2018, 18:59
SugandhaM wrote:
GMATNinja Hey! Can you please explain why each of the four options is incorrect?

There's a great explanation here from GMAT Club legend mikemcgarry. Let me know if that doesn't clear up your doubts?
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 01 Jan 2018
Posts: 120
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2018, 22:06
GMATNinja wrote:
SugandhaM wrote:
GMATNinja Hey! Can you please explain why each of the four options is incorrect?

There's a great explanation here from GMAT Club legend mikemcgarry. Let me know if that doesn't clear up your doubts?


Hey GMATNinja

If the intended meaning was to compare jump of genes with movement of Pearl, then E would be correct option?
_________________

kudos please if it helped you.

GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2093
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2018, 05:45
1
tamal99 wrote:

Hey GMATNinja

If the intended meaning was to compare jump of genes with movement of Pearl, then E would be correct option?

Here's the sentence again, with (E) plugged in:

Quote:
More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump," as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other.

There are still a few problems with (E). First, it doesn't make sense to say that the pearls "move mysteriously from one necklace to some other." To "another" necklace would be fine, but "some other" is an odd construction in this case. (And for whatever it's worth, I very strongly doubt that you'll ever see this particular issue again on an official question.)

The other problem is that the phrase "as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to another" seems to imply that pearls actually move from one necklace to another. And unless you're living someplace with very interesting laws of physics, that simply can't be the case. In (B), "genes" are compared to to "pearls moving mysteriously...", and that phrase does not imply that pearls actually move from one necklace to another.

Finally, you could also argue that (B) does a better job of cutting to the heart of the comparison. We're trying to compare two nouns ("genes" and "pearls moving mysteriously..."), and there's no need to reconstruct the sentence so that we're comparing two verb phrases ("genes jump..." and "as do pearls that move...").

I hope this helps!
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

GMAT Club Bot
Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner &nbs [#permalink] 19 Jul 2018, 05:45
Display posts from previous: Sort by

More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.