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More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner

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More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2019, 11:36
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egmat wrote:
Hi All,

More than 30 years ago Dr, Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can “jump”, as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

Image

“Like” and “As”, both are used to convey comparison is a sentence. However, there is a difference between their usages. “Like” is always followed only by a “noun” or a “pronoun” whereas “As” is always followed by a “clause”.

Going by this rule, the original sentence is incorrect because here “as” is not followed by a clause. This error can be rectified either by placing a clause after “as” or by replacing “as” with “like”.

POE:

Choice A: as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another. Incorrect for the reason stated above.

Choice B: like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another. Correct.

Choice C: as pearls do that move from one necklace to others. Incorrect. Firstly, “that” is relative pronoun that modifies a noun. So “that” should touch the noun it modifies. But in this choice, “that” is away. Also, the use of “others” is not correct here. The intended meaning is that pearls move from necklace to another necklace. Using “others” make it ambiguous as to where the pearls move to.

Choice D: like pearls do that move from one necklace to others. Incorrect. Apart from repeating the “that” and “others” errors of choice C, this choice has another error. “like” has been followed by a clause here.

Choice E: as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one. Incorrect. This sentence distorts the meaning of the sentence. By using the modifier "that move" and verb "do" for pearls, it appears that pearls to two actions - pearls jump and by the way these pearls also move mysteriously...This is not the intended meaning. The author actually wants to say that genes jump like the pearls. And then he describes the manner in which these pearls jump - by moving mysteriously.

Image

1. “Like” is followed by a noun and “as” is followed by a clause.
2. Be careful of any change in words that appear in the original sentence.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi

Would it be correct to claim that "other" and "some other" in some of the options are incorrect because they require nouns after them? e.g. some other JEWELRY

Thanks

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More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2019, 12:20
sonusaini1 wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry sir

would option C been correct , had one to others been replaced with one another?

Thanks & Regards

Hi sonusaini1,

Thanks generis for tagging me here! Yes, I can respond for Mike :)

It would not make sense to replace "others" with "one another" here:

as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to one another

But it would make sense to replace "others" with "another" (then it is clear that the pearls are moving from one necklace to another necklace). It's not necessary to repeat the noun (necklace), since the parallelism makes it clear:

as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to another

If "others" had been replaced with "another", then C would definitely be a bit better, but it still would be too wordy compared to B (that was the original reason why we eliminated C). The "that" clause in option C is still incorrect, and so B would still be the correct answer in this case.

I hope that helps! :)
-Carolyn
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More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2019, 03:23
BukrsGmat wrote:
I do have a question whether we are comparing genes with pearls or we are comparing the action of jumping
of genes with action of pearls movement.

I am confusing too ...how can possible ?!! there is 2 action "jump" in this case but we must use "like" ~!!!!!!!!!!!!!????? could someone explain /? this question remove in these days. :x :x :x

but I finally think "jump" in this case is just a noun !! not a action because it is in the ""
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Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2019, 18:11
09173140521 wrote:
but I finally think "jump" in this case is just a noun !! not a action because it is in the ""
That's just to show that jump is not a perfectly accurate way to describe what genes do. Can jump is definitely a verb. :)
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Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2019, 18:19
mikemcgarry wrote:
rohansherry wrote:
126. More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can
"jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one


I am responding to a p.m. from venmic, vvho vvrote: "The correct ansvver to this one is C not B." I am sorry to differ, but the correct ansvver is B

Idea #1
"like" is used for nouns only, to compare a noun to a noun
"as" introduces a full clause, that must have a full noun + verb structure
See these blog post:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... ike-vs-as/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... omparison/

Idea #2
DO NOT confuse a [noun + participle] structure for a full [noun + verb] structure. This is a very common mistake, the GMAT loves to catch folks in it.
A participle is a verb form, but it's not acting as a verb in the sentence --- rather, it's acting as a noun modifier.
See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/participle ... -the-gmat/

The phrase "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is not a full [noun + verb] clause --- it would not stand on it's own as a sentence. Rather, it's simply a noun plus a long noun modifier. All we have is the noun and stuff decorating the noun, so "as" is incorrect, and "like" is correct. That's why (A) is wrong and (B) is right.

Once we have the words "pearls do", that's a noun + verb, a clause all on its own --- then "like" is wrong: this is why (D) is wrong. Choices (C) & (E) have the correct word "as" followed by a full clause --- they avoid the "as"/"like" mistake. BUT, (C) & (E) are wordier, less polished, less elegant, more awkward. (B) is much more sleek and efficient, which makes (B) the correct answer.

Does all that make sense?

Mike :-)


Isn't this comparing jumping of Genes with jumping of pearls i.e action. So "as" should be used. Can you please explain??
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More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2019, 07:16
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mikemcgarry wrote:
rohansherry wrote:
126. More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can
"jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one


I am responding to a p.m. from venmic, vvho vvrote: "The correct ansvver to this one is C not B." I am sorry to differ, but the correct ansvver is B

Idea #1
"like" is used for nouns only, to compare a noun to a noun
"as" introduces a full clause, that must have a full noun + verb structure
See these blog post:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... ike-vs-as/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... omparison/

Idea #2
DO NOT confuse a [noun + participle] structure for a full [noun + verb] structure. This is a very common mistake, the GMAT loves to catch folks in it.
A participle is a verb form, but it's not acting as a verb in the sentence --- rather, it's acting as a noun modifier.
See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/participle ... -the-gmat/

The phrase "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is not a full [noun + verb] clause --- it would not stand on it's own as a sentence. Rather, it's simply a noun plus a long noun modifier. All we have is the noun and stuff decorating the noun, so "as" is incorrect, and "like" is correct. That's why (A) is wrong and (B) is right.

Once we have the words "pearls do", that's a noun + verb, a clause all on its own --- then "like" is wrong: this is why (D) is wrong. Choices (C) & (E) have the correct word "as" followed by a full clause --- they avoid the "as"/"like" mistake. BUT, (C) & (E) are wordier, less polished, less elegant, more awkward. (B) is much more sleek and efficient, which makes (B) the correct answer.

Does all that make sense?

Mike :-)


So the song "Love me like you do, love love love me like you do" is grammatically wrong?? I used to use English songs to learn English back in the day :shocked :cry:
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More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2020, 09:13
mikemcgarry wrote:
rohansherry wrote:
126. More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can
"jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one


I am responding to a p.m. from venmic, vvho vvrote: "The correct ansvver to this one is C not B." I am sorry to differ, but the correct ansvver is B

Idea #1
"like" is used for nouns only, to compare a noun to a noun
"as" introduces a full clause, that must have a full noun + verb structure
See these blog post:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... ike-vs-as/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... omparison/

Idea #2
DO NOT confuse a [noun + participle] structure for a full [noun + verb] structure. This is a very common mistake, the GMAT loves to catch folks in it.
A participle is a verb form, but it's not acting as a verb in the sentence --- rather, it's acting as a noun modifier.
See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/participle ... -the-gmat/

The phrase "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is not a full [noun + verb] clause --- it would not stand on it's own as a sentence. Rather, it's simply a noun plus a long noun modifier. All we have is the noun and stuff decorating the noun, so "as" is incorrect, and "like" is correct. That's why (A) is wrong and (B) is right.

Once we have the words "pearls do", that's a noun + verb, a clause all on its own --- then "like" is wrong: this is why (D) is wrong. Choices (C) & (E) have the correct word "as" followed by a full clause --- they avoid the "as"/"like" mistake. BUT, (C) & (E) are wordier, less polished, less elegant, more awkward. (B) is much more sleek and efficient, which makes (B) the correct answer.

Does all that make sense?

Mike :-)


Hi mikemcgarry ,

I am curious to know on whether is it not mandatory to apply parallelism as the first part of the sentence conveys an action with a clause and the second part just mentions a noun

"Genes can jump" - Is a clause, so isn't it important to maintain parallelism?

In that case, how about the following simplified sentence from OG

Owning a house is still a major goal of younger generations, like the goal of earlier generations?

This sentence was marked wrong Quoting parallelism as a reason! Link for question https://gmatclub.com/forum/according-to-a-recent-poll-owning-and-living-in-a-freestanding-house-107775.html

OG mentions that the portion before Like is a full clause, and the portion following like should be a full clause too

GMATNinja, @e-GMAT, please kindly help on this clarification, whether is it important to maintain the parallelism or not?

In case if I miss understood, please correct me

Thank You,
MB
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Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2020, 09:35
Hi,
My doubt arised from another OG question

let us consider the below sentence,
Owning a house is the goal of Younger generation, like the goal of Earlier generation
Many discussions in that section point that we can't use like as the first part of the sentence is a clause and hence second part should be a clause too
LINK to that question
https://gmatclub.com/forum/according-to ... 07775.html
If we go by that example, in this question, we also have the first portion which is a clause
Genes can jump, like pearls moving from X to Y.
Another similar sentence is:
John aced the test, like Dany - Is this sentence in correct?
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Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2020, 19:29
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bmvs wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry ,

I am curious to know on whether is it not mandatory to apply parallelism as the first part of the sentence conveys an action with a clause and the second part just mentions a noun

"Genes can jump" - Is a clause, so isn't it important to maintain parallelism?

In that case, how about the following simplified sentence from OG

Owning a house is still a major goal of younger generations, like the goal of earlier generations?

This sentence was marked wrong Quoting parallelism as a reason! Link for question https://gmatclub.com/forum/according-to-a-recent-poll-owning-and-living-in-a-freestanding-house-107775.html

OG mentions that the portion before Like is a full clause, and the portion following like should be a full clause too

GMATNinja, @e-GMAT, please kindly help on this clarification, whether is it important to maintain the parallelism or not?

In case if I miss understood, please correct me

Thank You,
MB

Let's look at a couple examples to illustrate the difference between the sentences in question:

1) "Genes, like pearls, can jump."

  • Here we are comparing "genes" and "pearls" -- two things that can apparently "jump".
  • We use "like" to compare two nouns, and that's exactly what we want here.

2) "Owning a house, like the goal of earlier generations, is still a goal of a majority of young adults."

  • Now we are comparing "owning a house" to "the goal of earlier generations" -- two things that, apparently, are still goals of a majority of young adults.
  • But what WAS the goal of earlier generations? Owning a house? Owning a Ferrari? Breaking 700 on the GMAT?? With this structure, the goal of earlier generations can really be anything, as long as it's a goal shared by a majority of young adults today.
  • In other words, this sentence does NOT make it entirely clear that both groups -- earlier generations and the majority of young adults today -- share the same goal (owning a house).

3) "Owning a house is still a major goal of younger generations, like the goal of earlier generations."

  • This is basically the same as the previous example. The "like" clause has been moved, but the sentence still has the same weakness.
  • We are really trying to say that "Owning a house IS still a major goal, JUST AS owning a house WAS a goal of earlier generations." That makes it perfectly clear that both groups shared the same goal. But we can't use "like" to compare two clauses.

So even though this question looks a bit like the "earlier generations" question, it's an entirely different animal!
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Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2020, 22:41
GMATNinja
This explanation has made my understanding of comparisons a lot better
You are the GUY
Thank you so much

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Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2020, 03:40
Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-

perfectstranger wrote:
More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other


Choice A: In Option A the word "as" is used to draw a comparison between the nouns "genes" and "pearls"; this is an inappropriate use of the word "as" because "as" can only be used to compare clauses. Thus, Option A is incorrect.

Choice B: Option B correctly uses "like" to refer to a noun, avoids pronoun ambiguity, conveys the intended meaning of the sentence, and is quite concise. Thus, Option B is correct.

Choice C: Option C suffers from a case of pronoun ambiguity, due to the use of the pronoun "others”; in this sentence, it is not clear what "others" refers to. The meaning of this clause, a comparison to pearls moving mysteriously between different necklaces, is obscured. Moreover, in Option C, "that" is incorrectly modifying "do" rather than "pearls". Thus, Option C is incorrect.

Choice D: Option D repeats the errors found in Option C and uses "like" to refer to a clause. Thus, Option D is incorrect.

Choice E: In Option E, the use of the phrase "to some other one" is unidiomatic and awkward’; ”some other one” uses three words to convey the same information that “another” conveys in just one word. Thus, Option E is incorrect.

One important thing to note here is that the phrase "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is not a full clause, as it cannot stand on its own as a sentence. "moving mysteriously" is not an acting verb; it is a participle. The full phrase does not depict a noun taking an action; rather it shows a noun that is modified by the description of an action. As an example, consider the phrase "The new car, driven recklessly by Mike"; this phrase is not a full clause, as there is no acting verb. "driven recklessly by Mike", simply describes an attribute of "the new car". Now, let us extend the phrase a little. "The new car, driven recklessly by Mike, soon began to fall apart." Now we have a full clause, as we have a verb that refers to action taken by the subject of the sentence.

Additionally, this sentence is a good example of the type of complexity that one often finds in the English language. The intended meaning of this sentence is to compare the actions of two things, the "jumping" of the genes and the mysterious movement of the hypothetical pearls. However, from a strictly grammatical point of view, what we are actually comparing are the two nouns, themselves.

Hence, B is the best answer choice.

To understand the concept of "Like v/s As on GMAT”, you may want to watch the following video (~1 minute):



To understand the concept of “Avoiding Pronoun Ambiguity on GMAT”, you may want to watch the following video (~1 minute):



All the best!
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Re: More than 30 years ago, Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner   [#permalink] 18 Jan 2020, 03:40

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