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Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the

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Re: Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2016, 23:27
Hey guys.
Can anybody explain why we do not use future tense? lands will drop while the rate of loss rises

Thank you

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Re: Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2016, 07:50
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Ruigr3 wrote:
Hey guys.
Can anybody explain why we do not use future tense? lands will drop while the rate of loss rises

Thank you


This usage is called future conditional - such usage is also observed in if and when clauses:

If I eat Pizza, I shall fall sick.
I shall talk to you when I have time.

Similarly,
The rate of addition to arable lands will drop while the rate of loss rises.

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New post 09 Oct 2016, 08:20
Thanks, sayantanc2k
Now I see it

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Re: Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2017, 08:20
Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the rate of addition to arable lands will drop while those of loss rise.

Issue: Pronoun | Meaning

Analysis:
1. The non-underlined portion of the sentence talks about "rate of addition". Hence the subject in the modifier clause "that the rate.." is singular.
2. For correct compare comparison, "rate of X" should be compared "rate for Y"


(A) those of loss rise - Plural pronoun has no referent
(B) it rises for loss - "it" is ambiguous
(C) those of losses rise - Plural pronoun has no referent
(D) the rate of loss rises
(E) there are rises for the rate of loss - "the rate of addition.." is not parallel with "there are rises..."

Answer: (D)

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New post 17 Aug 2017, 02:55
Although I got it wrong, D is the correct choice. I wanted to know if anyone can provide an explanation why A was incorrect?
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Re: Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2018, 01:26
Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the rate of addition to arable lands will drop while those of loss rise.
(A) those of loss rise -- those should logically refer to rate but those is plural whereas rate is singular
(B) it rises for loss -- it refers to rate of addition to arable lands --> illogical
(C) those of losses rise -- same as A
(D) the rate of loss rises -- Correct
(E) there are rises for the rate of loss -- wordy and redundant

Answer D
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Re: Ms. Chambers is among the forecasters who predict that the [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 21:31
daagh wrote:
Quote:
Hirendhanak wrote

"D" seems most obvious choice on two counts

1) the rate of xyz is singular.
2) E is redundant and B has unclear antecedent IT

pls feel free to correct me if i am wrong


D is certainly the choice.

But the reason of elimination of choices B is slightly off IMO.

1. B. There is no ambiguity about the antecedence of ‘it ‘. After all, the rate is the only singular noun on the text and it can not refer to any thing else and that is the right antecedent. One can not argue, it stands for addition becos, it makes no sense to say that addition rises for loss.

But B is wrong because of llism. The rate of addition uses an of preposition while it rises for loss uses a for preposition.



I will add another angle.
Rate of means - measuring rate something like Repo Rate etc. whereas Rate for means - what is the charge of something. E.g. What is the rate for 10gms of Gold.

So a subtle difference in meaning can alse be seen.
R.

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 21:52
When I met Liza yesterday, it was the first time I _____ her since Christmas.

a. saw
b. had seen
c. have seen
d. have been seen

sir/maam, can you please help me to know the correct answer and explain it. and why the other option is wrong

Posted from my mobile device

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 23:06
anah wrote:
When I met Liza yesterday, it was the first time I _____ her since Christmas.

a. saw
b. had seen
c. have seen
d. have been seen

sir/maam, can you please help me to know the correct answer and explain it. and why the other option is wrong

Posted from my mobile device



Although, I am not an expert but let me try.

Context - I met Liza yesterday - so past from now. Right !
usage of past tense verb " met " is correct for simple past tense.

Again the verb " was " denotes simple past so the next verb has to be logically in sense with the verbs " met and was".


The Present perfect tense indicates either continued action or continued effect of a completed action up to the present. With since, use the Present perfect to indicate an action or effect that continues to the present time. - Courtsey MGMAT SC Guide

In other words something that is continuosuly coming from the past to present and something that has only reference in the past. I think you must have figured out that the answer should be option C = have seen (have denotes present perfect and seen is the past participle of base verb form - to see)


option A - saw
now if I use the verb saw then three simple past verbs in the sentece " met " , " was" and "saw" will represent the same time of the action. In other words if two simple tense verbs are used in the sentence it clearly means that both verbs performed action at the same time.

So logically meeting her yesterday and seeing her (i.e. when see saw Liza on the eve of Christmas - a past event from yesterday) cannot be a simultaneous event.

option B - had seen

first of all had seen is a past perfect usage so it signifies past of the past. Now it can be used here but its not preferrable because we have already used another marker " yesterday" so relating two events in past

event 1 - past of past = seeing her on the eve of christmas
event 2 - past = meeting her yesterday

option D = have been seen
have been = present perfect continous and seen - past participle of the verb " to see "
so this construction is grammatically as well as logically incorrect

grammatically - seen should be seeing as verb-ing form is used for continuous events.
logically - if she is seeing her on a continous basis how come yesterday it was the first time.

R.

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