GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Sep 2018, 01:24

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 03 Oct 2016
Posts: 134
On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2018, 06:16
1
1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

17% (01:34) correct 83% (01:22) wrong based on 70 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Attachment:
Question.JPG
Question.JPG [ 9.37 KiB | Viewed 533 times ]

On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?

(1) The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero.
(2) The distance between 'c' and 'a' is the same as the distance between 'c' and '-b'.

Source: ExpertsGlobal

_________________

:-) Non-Allergic To Kudos :-)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 24 Nov 2017
Posts: 53
Location: India
GMAT 1: 720 Q51 V36
Re: On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 May 2018, 06:54
seed wrote:
Attachment:
Question.JPG

On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?

(1) The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero.
(2) The distance between 'c' and 'a' is the same as the distance between 'c' and '-b'.

Source: ExpertsGlobal


If we can establish that 'a' and 'c' are of opposite signs, the answer is Yes. Alternatively, if we can establish that 'a' and 'c' are of the same sign, the answer is No. In either case, the data is sufficient. If we cannot establish either, the data is not sufficient. The question stem has drawn the number line. So, a < b < c.

Statement 1: The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero.
Example: a = -4, c = -1. The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero. Zero is not in between 'a' and 'c'.
Counter example: a = -2, c = 1. The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero. Zero is in between 'a' and 'c'.

Statement 1 alone is not sufficient.

Statement 2: The distance between 'c' and 'a' is the same as the distance between 'c' and '-b'.
Example: a = -5, c = -1 and b = -3. a < b < c. |a - c| = 4. |(-b) - c| = 4. Zero does not lie between 'a' and 'c'. (In all such cases, c will be the arithmetic mean of 'a' and '-b')
Counter example: a = -1, b = 1, c = 2. a < b < c. |a - c| = 3. |(-b) - c| = 3. Zero lies between 'a' and 'c'. (In all such cases, a = -b.)

Statement 2 alone is not sufficient.

Statements together: The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero and The distance between 'c' and 'a' is the same as the distance between 'c' and '-b'
Example: a = -5, c = -1 and b = -3. a < b < c. Satisfies condition in both statements. Zero does not lie between 'a' and 'c'.
Counter example: 'a' has to be negative. 'c' has to be positive.
If a is negative and c is positive and if |a - c| = |(-b) - c| then it is possible only when a = -b.
That is 'a' and 'b' have the same magnitude but are of opposite signs. So, |a - 0| = |b - 0|. And if b < c as given in the number line, |a - 0| will not be greater than |c - 0|. It is not possible to find a counter example.
a = -1, b = 1, c = 2 clearly shows that distance between -1 and 0 is not greater than 2 and 0.

The counter example is not possible when we combine the two statements.
We can conclude that zero does not lie between 'a' and 'c'.

Choice C is the answer.
_________________

An IIM C Alumnus - Class of '94
GMAT Tutor at Wizako GMAT Classes & Online Courses

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 06 Mar 2017
Posts: 69
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, International Business
GMAT 1: 640 Q48 V31
GPA: 3.9
Re: On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Sep 2018, 02:06
seed wrote:
Attachment:
Question.JPG

On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?

(1) The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero.
(2) The distance between 'c' and 'a' is the same as the distance between 'c' and '-b'.

Source: ExpertsGlobal


Bunuel, VeritasKarishma, chetan2u

The solution provided in the thread is good, and I find it doable till 2 equations that is for options 'A' and 'B'...from 'C' onward it got difficult, I mean during actual exam its difficult to find the numbers to fit in YES/NO both situations.
Kindly help to solve the question in an easier and more doable method.
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
P
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 8283
Location: Pune, India
Re: On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Sep 2018, 01:56
seed wrote:
Attachment:
Question.JPG

On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?

(1) The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero.
(2) The distance between 'c' and 'a' is the same as the distance between 'c' and '-b'.

Source: ExpertsGlobal


---------- a ---------------------------------- b ----------- c ---------

On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?

(1) The distance of 'a' from zero is greater than the distance of 'c' from zero.

We can have 0 at 3 different places relative to 'a' and 'c'.

Case 1: -----0----- a ---------------------------------- b ----------- c ---------
Case 2: ---------- a ---------------------0------------- b ----------- c ---------
Case 3: ---------- a ---------------------------------- b ----------- c -----0----

But the first case is not possible since then a would be definitely closer to 0 than c would be. Cases 2 and 3 are both possible so this stmnt alone is not sufficient.

(2) The distance between 'c' and 'a' is the same as the distance between 'c' and '-b'.
If the distance between c and a is the same as distance between c and -b, -b can be at 2 places around c such that

Case 1: ---------- a and -b ----------------0---------------- b ----------- c ---------
a and -b are at the same point and 0 is between a and c somewhere.

Case 2: ---------- a ---------------------------------- b ----------- c ---------- 0 ------------------------- (-b) -----------
-b is to the other side of c (same distance away as a is to c) and 0 is somewhere to the right of c.

Again, 2 cases are possible so this stmtn alone is not sufficient.

Using both,

Case 1 of stmnt 2 becomes invalid because distance of a from 0 is equal to distance of b from 0 and hence this is less than distance of c from 0. This contradicts stmnt 1.
Only case 2 of stmnt 2 is possible in which 0 is to the right of c.
Hence, this is sufficient.

Answer (C)
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >

GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Re: On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'? &nbs [#permalink] 02 Sep 2018, 01:56
Display posts from previous: Sort by

On the number line shown, is zero between 'a' and 'c'?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.