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Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou

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New post 14 Apr 2019, 02:07
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Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hours after birth are very important to establishing a mother-infant bond, which is the first step in building a healthy relationship. Can you assure me that my relationship with my baby has not been permanently harmed by our separation for several days after his birth?

Physician: Your relationship with your child has not been harmed by the separation. Mother-infant bonding is not like an “instant glue” that cements your relationship forever. Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start, but many factors are involved in building a strong and lasting relationship between a mother and her child.

The doctor does which one of the following in her reply to her patient?


(A) She rejects an analogy in an attempt to reduce the patient’s concern.

(B) She cites evidence to show that the patient’s worry is unfounded.

(C) She misinterprets the patient’s explanation of her concern.

(D) She establishes that the article that the patient read was in error.

(E) She names other factors that are more important in creating a mother-infant bond.

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New post 14 Apr 2019, 06:02
Archit3110 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hours after birth are very important to establishing a mother-infant bond, which is the first step in building a healthy relationship. Can you assure me that my relationship with my baby has not been permanently harmed by our separation for several days after his birth?

Physician: Your relationship with your child has not been harmed by the separation. Mother-infant bonding is not like an “instant glue” that cements your relationship forever. Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start, but many factors are involved in building a strong and lasting relationship between a mother and her child.

The doctor does which one of the following in her reply to her patient?


(A) She rejects an analogy in an attempt to reduce the patient’s concern.

(B) She cites evidence to show that the patient’s worry is unfounded.

(C) She misinterprets the patient’s explanation of her concern.

(D) She establishes that the article that the patient read was in error.

(E) She names other factors that are more important in creating a mother-infant bond.


IMO A She rejects an analogy in an attempt to reduce the patient’s concern.


There are no analogies there; in fact, the doctor agrees with the patient, or, to be correct, with the article (Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start).

I think the answer is B, since she cites that there are other factors which influence the relationships between a mother and her child, which is evidence against the patient's worry.
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Re: Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2019, 12:27
I think its E because the doctor says "but many factors are involved in building a strong and lasting relationship between a mother and her child"

A is wrong because doctor agrees and says that there is a head start

B is wrong because there is no evidence stated, i think it's too strong a word

C - there is no misinterpretation...inface the doctor agreed with the patient

D is out of scope

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New post 14 Apr 2019, 12:32
B and E are close for the run-up to be correct choices.
In B- it says doctor cites evidence, however, doctor only names factors.
E should be the correct answer.
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Re: Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Apr 2019, 06:37
generis VeritasKarishma

Dear experts,
Can you please explain why E is not right and the rationale behind selecting A.

Regards,
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New post 15 Apr 2019, 07:35
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In my opinion, E is incorrect because the physician doesn't name the factors or specify them, she solely states that they exist and evenly contribute to the bond.
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Re: Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2019, 03:54
Bunuel wrote:
Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hours after birth are very important to establishing a mother-infant bond, which is the first step in building a healthy relationship. Can you assure me that my relationship with my baby has not been permanently harmed by our separation for several days after his birth?

Physician: Your relationship with your child has not been harmed by the separation. Mother-infant bonding is not like an “instant glue” that cements your relationship forever. Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start, but many factors are involved in building a strong and lasting relationship between a mother and her child.

The doctor does which one of the following in her reply to her patient?


(A) She rejects an analogy in an attempt to reduce the patient’s concern.

(B) She cites evidence to show that the patient’s worry is unfounded.

(C) She misinterprets the patient’s explanation of her concern.

(D) She establishes that the article that the patient read was in error.

(E) She names other factors that are more important in creating a mother-infant bond.


Would like to know the source of the question. Not happy with any option.

The gist is that the patient feels that the "immediate after-birth mother-infant bond is very important in building a healthy relation." Perhaps like a necessary condition.
The doctor says that the absence of this bond does not harm the relation. This bond is not sufficient for healthy future relation. It does give a head start but many other factors are involved in a healthy future bond.

So it seems that the doc says that absence of this bond is not necessary and there are other important factors too.

(A) doesn't seem appealing. The analogy it talks about is the "instant glue" one. The doctor introduces and rejects it to reduce patient's concern. But one would think that the analogy should have been given by the patient and she should be the one rejecting it to reduce patient's concern.

(B) She cites evidence to show that the patient’s worry is unfounded.

No evidence is given by her.

(C) She misinterprets the patient’s explanation of her concern.

The patient seems to feel that this bond is necessary for future relation and the doctor tries to convince that it is not sufficient for future relation (other factors are involved too). In this way it could be said that the doctor misinterprets the patient's explanation of her concern.

(D) She establishes that the article that the patient read was in error.

She does not "establish" that the article was erroneous. She takes a tangent explanation to alleviate the patient's concerns.

(E) She names other factors that are more important in creating a mother-infant bond.

She does not say "more important". She just says that many factors are involved.
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Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2019, 09:12
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Bunuel wrote:
Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hours after birth are very important to establishing a mother-infant bond, which is the first step in building a healthy relationship. Can you assure me that my relationship with my baby has not been permanently harmed by our separation for several days after his birth?

Physician: Your relationship with your child has not been harmed by the separation. Mother-infant bonding is not like an “instant glue” that cements your relationship forever. Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start, but many factors are involved in building a strong and lasting relationship between a mother and her child.

The doctor does which one of the following in her reply to her patient?
Quote:
(A) She rejects an analogy in an attempt to reduce the patient’s concern.
.
Looks very good. The doctor rejects an "instant glue" analogy. She does so because the patient expresses concern.
-- A person can both make an analogy and then reject that analogy.
Such rejection does not have to be in response to the other person's having brought up the analogy.
-- In fact, one common way to make an argument is to analogize the situation at issue to something else that is often stark or dramatic and then to point out that the analogy does not hold.


Quote:
(B) She cites evidence to show that the patient’s worry is unfounded.

The doctor cites no scientific evidence when she responds to the patient's worry.
No studies. No other articles. She offers her opinion.
She asserts that no harm has been done, which she supports
by rejecting the instant glue analogy and by asserting/opining that other factors over time ("building") are important.
ELIMINATE.

Quote:
(C) She misinterprets the patient’s explanation of her concern.

Absurd. Not one word suggests that the doctor misinterprets the patient's concern. ELIMINATE.

Quote:
(D) She establishes that the article that the patient read was in error.

Too specific and too strong, though possibly a keeper.
We know only one detail of the article.
-- the doctor addresses the detail. She makes assertions about the detail, but contrary assertions do not "establish" error.
They suggest error.
Cast doubt on the article's accuracy? Sure.
Establish that the article was in error? No. Too strong.

KEEP, but doubtful.

Quote:
(E) She names other factors that are more important in creating a mother-infant bond.

Inaccurate. "Names" is specific; the doctor is not specific.

selale caught and articulated the distinction well in THIS POST, here. +1
(Belated welcome to GMAT Club, selale . :) )

This option is incorrect because it uses the fatal phrase "names the other factors."
The doctor mentions that there ARE other factors involved in building the mother-child relationship.

The phrase "more important" is troublesome, too.

Name means to specify.
The doctor mentions but does not specify "other factors."

She does not name a single factor or the general KIND of even one those many factors.

Nor does she say clearly that the factors are MORE important.
-- We could argue that the doctor implies that those factors are more important than this single factor.

But her failure to name even one factor, let alone plural factorS, makes this option wrong.
ELIMINATE

***

ArupRS , option (E) must look tempting (it's the second favorite choice),
but it is not accurate. :)
The verb "name" and the verb phrase "mention generally" are not synonymous.

What option E describes is not the same as what the doctor does.

By contrast in (A), an analogy is exactly what the doctor uses when she says,
"Mother-infant bonding is not like an 'instant glue' that cements your relationship forever."

Which is the better of the two answers, A or D?

• Option (A) is better than (D)
-- Option (A) correctly characterizes a specific detail (rejects the "instant glue" analogy) in the correct context (the mother's concern).

-- In (D), the phrase "establishes that the article was in error" is too strong. The doctor's contrary assertions suggest but do not establish error. (D) is not as accurate as (A).

This question is pretty straightforward.

From current stats, many people believe that mentioning a category of items (other factors)
is equivalent to naming the items in that category. Those two actions are quite different.

In CR, keep your eye on every word -- in this case, verbs. :)

Hope that analysis helps.

Answer A is correct.
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New post 16 Apr 2019, 09:32
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Render wrote:

There are no analogies there; in fact, the doctor agrees with the patient, or, to be correct, with the article (Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start).

I think the answer is B, since she cites that there are other factors which influence the relationships between a mother and her child, which is evidence against the patient's worry.

Render - first, welcome to GMAT Club!

Second, there is an analogy, but maybe the words "instant glue" were not clear.

The doctor does not agree with the article.
-- Doctor: Your relationship [despite your not having instant contact with your baby after birth] has not been harmed.

ANALOGY: "Immediate bonding after birth" is not similar to "instant glue" in which one thing is sealed to another immediately, very strongly, and perhaps permanently by that instant glue.

-- With respect to answer B, please see my post HERE.
Offering an opinion is not the same as citing evidence.
Further, a "head start" simply means that the bonding starts earlier in time.
-- Suppose that two people are not racing against one another but both runners want to finish a 10K "race."
Person A starts at the gun.
Person B shows up 5 minutes late.
Person A has a head start on B — but B can still run the face and finish in the time it would have taken him anyway.
-- The implication of "head start" can mean "better in the long run," but given all the other things that the doctor says, in this context it means simply "started earlier, but that does not matter because building requires an ongoing process
that can be initiated immediately after or a few days after birth."

I can see why (B) is tempting, but in this question the authors have done what GMAC does:
present tempting alternatives that upon reflection, do not really fit or do not fit nearly as well as (A). :)
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Re: Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2019, 06:06
generis wrote:
Render wrote:

There are no analogies there; in fact, the doctor agrees with the patient, or, to be correct, with the article (Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start).

I think the answer is B, since she cites that there are other factors which influence the relationships between a mother and her child, which is evidence against the patient's worry.

Render - first, welcome to GMAT Club!

Second, there is an analogy, but maybe the words "instant glue" were not clear.

The doctor does not agree with the article.
-- Doctor: Your relationship [despite your not having instant contact with your baby after birth] has not been harmed.

ANALOGY: "Immediate bonding after birth" is not similar to "instant glue" in which one thing is sealed to another immediately, very strongly, and perhaps permanently by that instant glue.

-- With respect to answer B, please see my post HERE.
Offering an opinion is not the same as citing evidence.
Further, a "head start" simply means that the bonding starts earlier in time.
-- Suppose that two people are not racing against one another but both runners want to finish a 10K "race."
Person A starts at the gun.
Person B shows up 5 minutes late.
Person A has a head start on B — but B can still run the face and finish in the time it would have taken him anyway.
-- The implication of "head start" can mean "better in the long run," but given all the other things that the doctor says, in this context it means simply "started earlier, but that does not matter because building requires an ongoing process
that can be initiated immediately after or a few days after birth."

I can see why (B) is tempting, but in this question the authors have done what GMAC does:
present tempting alternatives that upon reflection, do not really fit or do not fit nearly as well as (A). :)


"Instant glue" seems like a new concept or maybe i am not familiar with it. Could you please throw some more light on it?
VeritasKarishma generis Render

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New post 17 Apr 2019, 07:16
neha283 wrote:
generis wrote:
Render wrote:

There are no analogies there; in fact, the doctor agrees with the patient, or, to be correct, with the article (Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start).

I think the answer is B, since she cites that there are other factors which influence the relationships between a mother and her child, which is evidence against the patient's worry.

Render - first, welcome to GMAT Club!

Second, there is an analogy, but maybe the words "instant glue" were not clear.

The doctor does not agree with the article.
-- Doctor: Your relationship [despite your not having instant contact with your baby after birth] has not been harmed.

ANALOGY: "Immediate bonding after birth" is not similar to "instant glue" in which one thing is sealed to another immediately, very strongly, and perhaps permanently by that instant glue.

-- With respect to answer B, please see my post HERE.
Offering an opinion is not the same as citing evidence.
Further, a "head start" simply means that the bonding starts earlier in time.
-- Suppose that two people are not racing against one another but both runners want to finish a 10K "race."
Person A starts at the gun.
Person B shows up 5 minutes late.
Person A has a head start on B — but B can still run the face and finish in the time it would have taken him anyway.
-- The implication of "head start" can mean "better in the long run," but given all the other things that the doctor says, in this context it means simply "started earlier, but that does not matter because building requires an ongoing process
that can be initiated immediately after or a few days after birth."

I can see why (B) is tempting, but in this question the authors have done what GMAC does:
present tempting alternatives that upon reflection, do not really fit or do not fit nearly as well as (A). :)


"Instant glue" seems like a new concept or maybe i am not familiar with it. Could you please throw some more light on it?
VeritasKarishma generis Render

Thanks!

neha283 , "instant glue" is in quotation marks to indicate that it is a special kind of glue.

Even if you don't know that the phrase refers to glue that in English is called "super glue" or "crazy glue," the phrase "instant glue" is descriptive: glue that forms an immediate and probably unbreakable bond.

The doctor is saying that a mother's holding a baby immediately after birth is a nice thing, but the action is not ritualistic "instant glue" in which the bond between mother and child is instantly (and stickily) established.

Google "instant glue" "super glue" "gorilla glue" and "crazy glue." They are fast-acting glues that make things stick together for a long time.

HERE is an entry with a short video in which a thin rubber tube is instant-glued to a heavy bowling ball (probably 10 lbs or 4.5 kg). The glue dries quickly. The presenter picks up the heavy ball with the little tube.

Hope that helps.
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Re: Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2019, 05:23
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Hi generis
I thought instant glue was some new jargon for a concept in reference to GMAT. I am aware of usual glue though. Thank you!
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Re: Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2019, 07:47
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generis wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hours after birth are very important to establishing a mother-infant bond, which is the first step in building a healthy relationship. Can you assure me that my relationship with my baby has not been permanently harmed by our separation for several days after his birth?

Physician: Your relationship with your child has not been harmed by the separation. Mother-infant bonding is not like an “instant glue” that cements your relationship forever. Having your infant with you during the period immediately after birth does give your relationship a head start, but many factors are involved in building a strong and lasting relationship between a mother and her child.

The doctor does which one of the following in her reply to her patient?
Quote:
(A) She rejects an analogy in an attempt to reduce the patient’s concern.
.
Looks very good. The doctor rejects an "instant glue" analogy. She does so because the patient expresses concern.
-- A person can both make an analogy and then reject that analogy.
Such rejection does not have to be in response to the other person's having brought up the analogy.
-- In fact, one common way to make an argument is to analogize the situation at issue to something else that is often stark or dramatic and then to point out that the analogy does not hold.


Quote:
(B) She cites evidence to show that the patient’s worry is unfounded.

The doctor cites no evidence in responding to the patient's worry.
No studies. No other articles. She offers her opinion.
She asserts that no harm has been done, which she supports
by rejecting the instant glue analogy and by asserting/opining that other factors over time ("building') are important.
ELIMINATE.

Quote:
(C) She misinterprets the patient’s explanation of her concern.

Absurd. Not one word suggests that the doctor misinterprets the patient's concern. ELIMINATE.

Quote:
(D) She establishes that the article that the patient read was in error.

Too specific and too strong, though possibly a keeper.
We know only one detail of the article.
-- the doctor addresses the detail. She makes assertions about the detail, but contrary assertions do not "establish" error.
They suggest error.
Cast doubt on the article's accuracy? Sure.
Establish that the article was in error? No. Too strong.

KEEP, but doubtful.

Quote:
(E) She names other factors that are more important in creating a mother-infant bond.

Inaccurate. "Names" is specific; the doctor is not specific.

selale caught and articulated the distinction well in THIS POST, here. +1
(Belated welcome to GMAT Club, selale . :) )

This option is incorrect because it uses the fatal phrase "names the other factors."
The doctor mentions that there ARE other factors involved in building the mother-child relationship.

The phrase "more important" is troublesome, too.

Name means to specify.
The doctor mentions but does not specify "other factors."

She does not name a single factor or the general KIND of even one those many factors.

Nor does she say clearly that the factors are MORE important.
-- We could argue that the doctor implies that those factors are more important than this single factor.

But her failure to name even one of those factors, let alone plural factorS, makes this option wrong.
ELIMINATE

***

ArupRS , option (E) must look tempting (it's the second favorite choice),
but it is not accurate. :)
The verb "name" and the verb phease "mention generally" are not synonymous.

What option E describes is not the same as what the doctor does.

By contrast in (A), an analogy is exactly what the doctor uses when she says,
"Mother-infant bonding is not like an 'instant glue' that cements your relationship forever."

Which is the better of the two answers, A or D?

• Option (A) is better than (D)
-- Option (A) correctly characterizes a specific detail (rejects the "instant glue" analogy) in the correct context (the mother's concern).

-- In (D), the phrase "establishes that the article was in error" is too strong. The doctor's contrary assertions suggest but do not establish error. (D) is not as accurate as (A).

This question is pretty straightforward.

From current stats, many people believe that mentioning a category of items (other factors)
is equivalent to naming the items in that category. Those two actions are quite different.

In CR, keep your eye on every week in this case, verbs. :)

Hope that analysis helps.

Answer A is correct.

Nice explanation generis.

Regards,
Arup
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Re: Patient: Doctor, I read an article that claimed that the first few hou   [#permalink] 20 Apr 2019, 07:47
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