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QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff

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QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 256: Sentence Correction


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Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier's pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.
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QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become

I often hear people say that (A) isn’t parallel: “…Deborah Sampson… joined the Continental Army…, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783…” That’s actually completely fine: we have three parallel verbs, and they make perfect sense, since they are three actions that Sampson performed.

The objection is usually that the three verbs “aren’t in the same form” or “don’t sound the same.” Neither of those are legitimate objections. All that really matters is that they’re three verbs that logically are three actions performed by the subject of the clause. It’s not a problem that one is an action verb (“joined”) and the other two are states of being (“was injured” and “was discharged”).

The only other potential issue is the past perfect tense (“had become”) at the end of the sentence. We can only use past perfect tense to describe an action that happened in the past, but BEFORE some other past action, which is usually in simple past tense. And we have that: she “had become too ill too serve” before she “was discharged.”

So let’s keep (A).

Quote:
(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

My biggest issue is with the phrase “while being discharged in 1783.” Literally, that seems to be saying that she simultaneously was discharged and was injured three times in 1783. And that makes no sense – there’s no way that those things can happen at the same exact time.

Plus, I think we would need an “and” somewhere in here: there are several actions, and at least two of them (“joined the Continental Army” and “was injured three times”) already seem to be parallel. So the “and” is necessary.

That’s enough to eliminate (B).

Quote:
(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

Now this is a weird mess. Sampson “joined the Continental Army… and was injured… and discharged…” Huh? First of all, those three actions (“joined”, “was injured”, and “was discharged”) are logically parallel to each other, so we only need one “and” – not two.

Second, it’s wrong to say that Sampson “discharged in 1783.” We could say that she WAS discharged from the Army, or I guess we could say that she “discharged a weapon” (a semi-obscure way to say that she fired it). But you wouldn’t just say that “Sampson… discharged.”

And “being” is also a mess. It seems to be trying to act as a modifier of some sort, but that’s rarely an acceptable use on the GMAT. (More on “being” here.)

So we have tons of reasons to ditch (C).

Quote:
(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was

(D) isn’t too bad, but it doesn’t make sense to say that Sampson “injured three times.” You can say that she WAS injured three times, or maybe that she injured three enemy soldiers. But you can’t say that she “injured three times.”

And that’s enough to disqualify (D).

Quote:
(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

Whenever you see a “having + verb” construction on the GMAT, it generally needs to be the first of two past actions. So you could say something like “having studied all night, Souvik collapsed on the sofa and watched three consecutive Marvel films.” In other words, he studied first, and then collapsed. Fair enough.

But in (E), it sounds like Sampson was injured and discharged first, and THEN she joined the Army. And that makes no sense at all.

We also have a problem with “being”, which is apparently being used as a modifier in (E) – and that’s a use that we almost never see on correct GMAT questions. “Being” isn’t always wrong on the GMAT, but it’s probably wrong here.

But even if you really love “being” in (E) for some inexplicable reason, we still have lots of reasons to eliminate (E). And we’re left with (A).
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 01:39
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 256: Sentence Correction


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Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier's pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.


I will go for A

"JOINED the continental army, WAS injured, and WAS discharged" are parallel

"she HAD BECOME ill" is necessary here to emphasis the condition that she was ill before she was discharged

the use of WAS ILL in D is wrong on this ground. Also, she didn't injure anybody, but rather she was injured

looking forward to the explanation from GMATNinja the great

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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 02:06
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 256: Sentence Correction


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Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier's pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.


(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become--was injured has no noun..

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become--rejected the being..

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being--rejected the being..

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was--correct

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being--rejected the being..

Please correct me ....if i am wrong..
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 02:25
kunalcvrce wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 256: Sentence Correction


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Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier's pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.


(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become--was injured has no noun..

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become--rejected the being..

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being--rejected the being..

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was--correct

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being--rejected the being..

Please correct me ....if i am wrong..


the answer is A

Deborah Sampson was injured

thanks
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 03:31
I think the phrase here "joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22" is actually a modifier and first verb is "was injured ", which is parallel to "was discharged". IMO - A is correct answer.
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 06:20
kunalcvrce wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 256: Sentence Correction


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For All QOTD Questions Click Here


Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier's pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.


(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become--was injured has no noun..

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become--rejected the being..

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being--rejected the being..

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was--correct

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being--rejected the being..

Please correct me ....if i am wrong..




Option D cannot be the correct answer since "injured three times" acts as a modifier, and it seems that "injured three times" modifies "At the age of 22"
Option A is the correct answer since "Deborah Sampson" is the subject for the phrase "was injured three times" where as "the first woman to draw a soldier's pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times" acts as modifier for "Deborah Sampson"

Plus its better to eliminate the options based on concrete errors, since "being" is not always wrong in GMAT SC. Opions B,C and E have other errors.

Looking forward to further explanations.
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 12:19
Here's my POE-
...,Deb S,..., joined the CA in xxxx at the age of 22, was injured 3X, and was discharged.....
A- Noun/Subject, ver-eb modifier, List Item 1, List Item 2
B- Noun/Subject, ver-ed modifier, while.. she had.. X
C- Noun/Subject, ver-ed modifier, and L1, and L2, being.. X
D- Noun/Subject, ver-ed modifier, verb-ed modifier and was dicharged beacuse...X
E- Noun/Subject, ver-ed modifier, Verb-ing L1 and verb-ed L2 X
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QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 18:17
(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become - Correct

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become - Illogical meaning and parallelism marker 'and' is missing

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being - Parallelism error and the verb 'was' is missing for 'discharged'

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was - the verb 'was' is missing for 'injured'. Also the tense sequence is not correct.

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being - Illogical meaning.

Answer: A
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 22:09
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 256: Sentence Correction


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For All QOTD Questions Click Here


Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier's pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.


The correct Answer should be A. Following is the explanation


(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become - This statement correctly identifies that past and past perfect events. She had become ill and so she was discharged correctly identifies the sequence of events in the past, also "injured" required the verb to be associated with it

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become- Being is the wrong use of word over here

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being -Same as above

(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was -This statement misses the verb required

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being -Again as B and C above




-------------------------------
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2018, 03:14
This question tests knowledge of modifiers , parallelism , and tenses. Cut the fluff and you have a parallel list. Only option A fits the bill.
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2018, 08:47
GMATNinja

Quote:
Whenever you see a “having + verb” construction on the GMAT, it generally needs to be the first of two past actions. So you could say something like “having studied all night, Souvik collapsed on the sofa and watched three consecutive Marvel films.” In other words, he studied first, and then collapsed. Fair enough.


Do we treat coma + having as a verb or as a noun modifier showing how / result of preceding clause?
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2018, 08:53
adkikani wrote:
GMATNinja

Quote:
Whenever you see a “having + verb” construction on the GMAT, it generally needs to be the first of two past actions. So you could say something like “having studied all night, Souvik collapsed on the sofa and watched three consecutive Marvel films.” In other words, he studied first, and then collapsed. Fair enough.


Do we treat coma + having as a verb or as a noun modifier showing how / result of preceding clause?

I'm not 100% sure that I'm interpreting your question correctly, but you could think of "having + verb" as just another "-ing" modifier, in some sense. "Having studied all night, ______" -- well, the blank needs to be filled with somebody that studied all night before doing something else. Sure, "having + verb" has to describe the first of two actions, but that action also has to "make sense" with the noun that follows, just like the other "-ing" modifiers discussed in this article.

Does that help? And the example involving three consecutive Marvel films may or may not describe a real person. ;)
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2018, 18:17
GMATNinja

Thanks for your two cents. Here was from where my question stemmed.

When you wrote about considering having + verb as an action, which comes earlier out
of two actions, I immediately related the construction as one similar to past perfect tense
which is a verb. However, as you correctly pointed out, the having + verb is a modifier that refers
back to subject - Souvik which is a noun. This makes sense to treat the modifier as a noun modifier.

And thanks for sharing more info about Souvik ;)
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2018, 21:36
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And thanks for sharing more info about Souvik ;)

What?! I mean, "Souvik" was just a randomly selected name. I mean, totally just a coincidence. Did you really think that souvik101990 is a hard-working movie lover? ;) ;) ;)
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Re: QOTD: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff   [#permalink] 18 Apr 2018, 21:36
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