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QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners

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QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners [#permalink]

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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 118: Critical Reasoning


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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

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QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners [#permalink]

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We are asked to select an answer choice that would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other, so let's start by identifying the two hypotheses. Each of the following hypotheses is meant to explain why, "when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack."

    1) "Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest." - According to this hypothesis, the beetles cannot sustain their pace while running toward an insect and, thus, stop intermittently to rest.

    2) "While running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop." - According to this hypothesis, tiger beetles are exposed to rapidly changing visual information while running. The beetles are unable to adequately process all of this information, causing them to quickly go blind. The beetles must then pause until the blindness passes and they can resume their chase.

Quote:
(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

We are looking for information that helps us evaluate two hypotheses that might explain why, "when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack." Choice (A) only tells us what happens when a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle and, thus, does not help us evaluate either hypothesis. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

According to the second hypothesis, the beetle must intermittently pause in order to process visual information. If the beetle is able to continually alter its course while running after a swerving insect, this implies that the beetle does NOT need to pause to process the visual information. Thus, the first part of choice (B) undermines the second hypothesis.

According to the first hypothesis, the beetle must pause in order to rest because it cannot sustain its pace. The second part of choice (B) is consistent with this hypothesis. If the pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses, this is evidence that it becomes more and more difficult for the beetle to sustain its pace without resting.

Thus, choice (B) undermines the second hypothesis and supports the first hypothesis. This is exactly what we are looking for, so keep (B).

Quote:
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

The first part of choice (C) also undermines the second hypothesis. If the beetle is able to respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, this is evidence that the beetle is able to process the rapidly changing visual information without pausing.

In order for choice (C) to work, the second part must SUPPORT the first hypothesis. which says that the beetles must pause for rest in order to maintain their pace. If that were the case, we would expect the pauses to be MORE frequent when the chase is up an incline (since it would take more effort for the beetle to maintain its pace). However, choice (C) says that the beetle pauses EQUALLY frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. At best, we could argue that this doesn't necessarily weaken the first hypothesis, but it certainly does not support the first hypothesis. Thus, choice (C) must be eliminated.

Quote:
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

Choice (D) does not give us any evidence related to the intermittent pauses and thus does not support or undermine either hypothesis. Eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

Choice (E) supports the first hypothesis by suggesting that the beetle gets tired faster when it is running faster. This supports the idea that the beetle must pause for rest in order to maintain its pace. Choice (E) also seems to support the second hypothesis. When the beetle is running faster, it has to process more visual information, leading to more frequent stops. Choice (E) does not undermine either hypothesis and, thus, must be eliminated.

Choice (B) is the best answer.
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Re: QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2017, 08:41
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.


Answer : B

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Re: QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2017, 23:43
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping. -This is out of scope. We are looking for a scenario in which the beetle chases the insect and not the other way round.
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses. -Correct. "altering of path" weakens the second hypothesis that suggests that beetles stop to adapt to the changing visual information. "frequent pauses" strengthen the first hypothesis that states that beetles stop because they get tired during the chase.
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. -The "changing of direction" weakens the second hypothesis. The beetle pauses up/down the slope indicate that the beetle isn't stopping because it gets tired, but because of something else, since while chasing the insect on an inclined surface the beetles should stop more than while chasing the insects on a declined surface. Thus, this gives an alternate reasoning for the first hypothesis, weakening the hypothesis. Since both the options weaken both the hypothesis, this option is incorrect.
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit. -Out of scope.
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops. -This option strengthens the first hypothesis, but doesn't talk about the second hypothesis.
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QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2017, 22:13
GMATNinja wrote:
We are asked to select an answer choice that would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other, so let's start by identifying the two hypotheses. Each of the following hypotheses is meant to explain why, "when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack."

    1) "Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest." - According to this hypothesis, the beetles cannot sustain their pace while running toward an insect and, thus, stop intermittently to rest.

    2) "While running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop." - According to this hypothesis, tiger beetles are exposed to rapidly changing visual information while running. The beetles are unable to adequately process all of this information, causing them to quickly go blind. The beetles must then pause until the blindness passes and they can resume their chase.

Quote:
(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

We are looking for information that helps us evaluate two hypotheses that might explain why, "when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack." Choice (A) only tells us what happens when a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle and, thus, does not help us evaluate either hypothesis. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

According to the second hypothesis, the beetle must intermittently pause in order to process visual information. If the beetle is able to continually alter its course while running after a swerving insect, this implies that the beetle does NOT need to pause to process the visual information. Thus, the first part of choice (B) undermines the second hypothesis.

According to the first hypothesis, the beetle must pause in order to rest because it cannot sustain its pace. The second part of choice (B) is consistent with this hypothesis. If the pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses, this is evidence that it becomes more and more difficult for the beetle to sustain its pace without resting.

Thus, choice (B) undermines the second hypothesis and supports the first hypothesis. This is exactly what we are looking for, so keep (B).

Quote:
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

The first part of choice (C) also undermines the second hypothesis. If the beetle is able to respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, this is evidence that the beetle is able to process the rapidly changing visual information without pausing.

In order for choice (C) to work, the second part must SUPPORT the first hypothesis. which says that the beetles must pause for rest in order to maintain their pace. If that were the case, we would expect the pauses to be MORE frequent when the chase is up an incline (since it would take more effort for the beetle to maintain its pace). However, choice (C) says that the beetle pauses EQUALLY frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. At best, we could argue that this doesn't necessarily weaken the first hypothesis, but it certainly does not support the first hypothesis. Thus, choice (C) must be eliminated.

Quote:
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

Choice (D) does not give us any evidence related to the intermittent pauses and thus does not support or undermine either hypothesis. Eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

Choice (E) supports the first hypothesis by suggesting that the beetle gets tired faster when it is running faster. This supports the idea that the beetle must pause for rest in order to maintain its pace. Choice (E) also seems to support the second hypothesis. When the beetle is running faster, it has to process more visual information, leading to more frequent stops. Choice (E) does not undermine either hypothesis and, thus, must be eliminated.

Choice (B) is the best answer.


Hello,

According to the official solution (GMAT OG - 2018, diagnostic test, q-73) option choice B is the correct answer, but option B strengthens the second hypothesis (ie. they stop intermittently to process images) and weakens the alternate hypothesis.

Why so?


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Re: QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2017, 09:58
GMATNinja wrote:
We are asked to select an answer choice that would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other, so let's start by identifying the two hypotheses. Each of the following hypotheses is meant to explain why, "when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack."

    1) "Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest." - According to this hypothesis, the beetles cannot sustain their pace while running toward an insect and, thus, stop intermittently to rest.

    2) "While running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop." - According to this hypothesis, tiger beetles are exposed to rapidly changing visual information while running. The beetles are unable to adequately process all of this information, causing them to quickly go blind. The beetles must then pause until the blindness passes and they can resume their chase.

Quote:
(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

We are looking for information that helps us evaluate two hypotheses that might explain why, "when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack." Choice (A) only tells us what happens when a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle and, thus, does not help us evaluate either hypothesis. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

According to the second hypothesis, the beetle must intermittently pause in order to process visual information. If the beetle is able to continually alter its course while running after a swerving insect, this implies that the beetle does NOT need to pause to process the visual information. Thus, the first part of choice (B) undermines the second hypothesis.

According to the first hypothesis, the beetle must pause in order to rest because it cannot sustain its pace. The second part of choice (B) is consistent with this hypothesis. If the pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses, this is evidence that it becomes more and more difficult for the beetle to sustain its pace without resting.

Thus, choice (B) undermines the second hypothesis and supports the first hypothesis. This is exactly what we are looking for, so keep (B).

Quote:
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

The first part of choice (C) also undermines the second hypothesis. If the beetle is able to respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, this is evidence that the beetle is able to process the rapidly changing visual information without pausing.

In order for choice (C) to work, the second part must SUPPORT the first hypothesis. which says that the beetles must pause for rest in order to maintain their pace. If that were the case, we would expect the pauses to be MORE frequent when the chase is up an incline (since it would take more effort for the beetle to maintain its pace). However, choice (C) says that the beetle pauses EQUALLY frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. At best, we could argue that this doesn't necessarily weaken the first hypothesis, but it certainly does not support the first hypothesis. Thus, choice (C) must be eliminated.

Quote:
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

Choice (D) does not give us any evidence related to the intermittent pauses and thus does not support or undermine either hypothesis. Eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

Choice (E) supports the first hypothesis by suggesting that the beetle gets tired faster when it is running faster. This supports the idea that the beetle must pause for rest in order to maintain its pace. Choice (E) also seems to support the second hypothesis. When the beetle is running faster, it has to process more visual information, leading to more frequent stops. Choice (E) does not undermine either hypothesis and, thus, must be eliminated.

Choice (B) is the best answer.


Hi GMATNinja

if the beetle run away non stop from prey insect, it means the beetle doesn't need to pursue the insect so change the visual information is not needed ( this approve the second hypothesis) while the beetle is run without stop means it doesn't need to take a rest( so, disapprove the first hypothesis)

am I wrong?

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Re: QOTD: Tiger beetles are such fast runners   [#permalink] 24 Oct 2017, 09:58
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