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Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left

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Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.
(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.
(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.
(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.
(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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vaivish1723 wrote:
Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?
(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.
(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.
(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.
(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.
(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.

I do not have the ans for this Q/ . Can somebody discuss this one.


I am almost certain the answer is B). The conclusion is that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries, so we must attack that conclusions.
A) strengthens, not weakens.
B) is the correct answer. If there aren't many jobs, then there is less demand, so therefore the workers may not be in high demand.
C) Not relevant
D) I considered this for a second, but just because they need to train new workers, that does not weaken the fact that skilled workers are in high demand. if anything, skilled workers would still be in demand which is why they are training unskilled workers.
E) strengthens, not weakens.

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2009, 15:34
vaivish1723 wrote:
Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.


(B) negates the possibility of the rise in demand for skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe by eliminating the possibility of the rise in the demand due to the major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.

IMO B
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2010, 10:54
According to me the answer is D. This is the only one that can weaken the argument that highly skilled workers are in high demand in home countries in that the companies in home countries are planning on training ppl rather than hiring highly skilled workers.

When do we know the right answer?

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2010, 15:51
priyanka116 wrote:
According to me the answer is D. This is the only one that can weaken the argument that highly skilled workers are in high demand in home countries in that the companies in home countries are planning on training ppl rather than hiring highly skilled workers.

When do we know the right answer?

Click on "Reveal" just below the original post; The answer is there.
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2010, 18:20
In this question if one focuses on the conclusion - "It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries."

2 things come out - skilled workers and high demand.

If you choose D then you were focusing on the skilled workers part of it and if you choose B you were focusing on the high demand aspect of it.

Although D is a strong contender, it leaves room for another assumption that "the countries plan to train the new workers because they are not highly skilled already"

But B leaves no room for doubt - it clearly states that there is less demand---weakening the conclusion.
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2010, 11:58
I admit that my initial selection was D but carefully looking into B and D, B is more weaker than D.

A-S+
B-W+ ( most seriously weakens the argument)
C-none
D-W (seriously weakens the argument)
E-S

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 13 Apr 2011, 13:45
B is the best choice because it states jobs are going away.

D is a good choice but the jobs are still available so that is why companies are training people

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2011, 16:25
A major impediment to wide acceptance of electric vehicles even on the part of people who use their cars almost exclusively for commuting is the inability to use their electric vehicles for occasional extended trips. In an attempt to make purchasing electric vehicles more attractive to commuters, one electric vehicle producer is planning to offer customers three days free rental of a conventional car for every 1,000 miles that they drive their electric vehicle.

Which of the following, if true, most threatens the plan's prospects for success?

A. Many electric vehicles that are used for commercial purposes are not needed for extended trips.
B. Because a majority of commuters drive at least 100 miles per week, the cost of the producer of making good the offer would add considerably to the already high price of electric vehicles.
C. The relatively long time it takes to recharge the battery of an electric vehicle can easily be fitted into the regular patterns of car use characteristic of commuters.
D. Although electric vehicles are essentially emission- free in actual use, generating the electricity necessary for charging an electric vehicle's battery can burden the environment.
E. Some family vehicles are used primarily not for commuting but for making short local trips, such as to do errands.
please help me out with the answer to this question
OA is (B) but my confusion is cost is not mentioned as an impediment in purchasing the electric car,then then how is B correct(it must be a shell game choice)
please reply

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2011, 01:21
priyanka116 wrote:
According to me the answer is D. This is the only one that can weaken the argument that highly skilled workers are in high demand in home countries in that the companies in home countries are planning on training ppl rather than hiring highly skilled workers.

When do we know the right answer?


D actually strengthen the argument. When Eastern Europe plans to train new workers to replace the skilled workers, this means that skilled workers are still in demand.
B weaken the argument by saying that the demand for skilled workers is low due to the economic meldown.
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2012, 20:26
firang wrote:
In this question if one focuses on the conclusion - "It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries."

2 things come out - skilled workers and high demand.

If you choose D then you were focusing on the skilled workers part of it and if you choose B you were focusing on the high demand aspect of it.

Although D is a strong contender, it leaves room for another assumption that "the countries plan to train the new workers because they are not highly skilled already"

But B leaves no room for doubt - it clearly states that there is less demand---weakening the conclusion.


In my opinion, D is not at all a contender, in fact, it supports the argument.
Author concluded that there will be demand for workers, meaning there will be lot of jobs available. We need to disprove this point.

D says companies are going to train NEW employees, meaning they are going to HIRE first and then train. This clearly supports author's point. Had D simply mentioned that companies will replace by training EXISTING talent, it would have weakened the author's point.
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2012, 05:44
I initially went with Option D...after reading the explanations above i see that B is the correct answer and i can understand now why D is not the answer..thanks folks
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2012, 06:36
Answer is B.
Here we have to focus on "why highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West and from that conclusion is that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries. ???!?!?!?!"

so It is not our concern that what happen before and after worker left eastern Europe and about their vacant positions available in companies or worker's skills or any other points which are not related to argument.

(A) Preference of Eastern European factories... Who cares ???
(B) European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions... Bullz eye. it is the weakening the conclusion.
(C) European emigrants need to acquire new skills after... No relation with argument
(D) European countries plan to train many new workers to... Training is out of scope...
(E) vacant positions... Bad Idea...

So answer is B...

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2013, 04:22
vaivish1723 wrote:
Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.
(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.
(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.
(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.
(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.

Can somebody discuss this one.


According to the conclusion, the skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries because a lot of them have emigrated to the west.
This stance would be weakened by a statement which states that there is not much demand for "labor".
Think about it.. Why would laborers be in demand if there is no labor?

This situation is well stated in B and hence B is the answer .

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2013, 09:36
vaivish1723 wrote:
Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.
(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.
(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.
(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.
(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.

Can somebody discuss this one.


Premise: a lot of high skilled workers left Eastern to the West.
Conclusion: skilled workers who remain in Eastern are in high demand.
Assumption: the number of position for skilled workers does not decrease.

B is correct.
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2013, 11:06
adhithya wrote:
A major impediment to wide acceptance of electric vehicles even on the part of people who use their cars almost exclusively for commuting is the inability to use their electric vehicles for occasional extended trips. In an attempt to make purchasing electric vehicles more attractive to commuters, one electric vehicle producer is planning to offer customers three days free rental of a conventional car for every 1,000 miles that they drive their electric vehicle.

Which of the following, if true, most threatens the plan's prospects for success?

A. Many electric vehicles that are used for commercial purposes are not needed for extended trips.
B. Because a majority of commuters drive at least 100 miles per week, the cost of the producer of making good the offer would add considerably to the already high price of electric vehicles.
C. The relatively long time it takes to recharge the battery of an electric vehicle can easily be fitted into the regular patterns of car use characteristic of commuters.
D. Although electric vehicles are essentially emission- free in actual use, generating the electricity necessary for charging an electric vehicle's battery can burden the environment.
E. Some family vehicles are used primarily not for commuting but for making short local trips, such as to do errands.
please help me out with the answer to this question
OA is (B) but my confusion is cost is not mentioned as an impediment in purchasing the electric car,then then how is B correct(it must be a shell game choice)
please reply

I am finding it difficult.Need detail explanation of every answer choice

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.

(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.

(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.

(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.

(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2015, 22:05
How can (B) be the OA.I was for (D).Experts please help me.

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2015, 04:34
Hi Answer is definitely B. My though process is as follows

Option A: Clearly outof scope of the argument.

Option C: EE skilled workers need to learn new skill reaching west- Does not matter. Clearly irrelevant.

Option D: Clearly out of the scope.

Option E: Many unfilled position is strengthing the conclusion and hence not the right answer.


Option B: Correct answer because, many position previosly held by EE skilled workers have been eliminated and hence clearly the remaining skilled workers in the EE are not in demand (because of the fewer jobs)

Hence B breaks the conclusion.

Hope this helps.


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souvik101990 wrote:
Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.

(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.

(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.

(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.

(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left   [#permalink] 18 Apr 2015, 04:34

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