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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid

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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2014, 06:22
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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hide themselves underneath plants or porches immediately before they shed their skins. One hypothesis that explains this behavior is that snakes hide to escape the notice of airborne predators during shedding season, when snakes' excess skin increases their visibility to these predators. The hypothesis above depends on which of the following assumptions?

A. Airborne predators that feed on snakes will seek other prey during shedding season, because they are likely aware that snakes tend to be hidden during this season.
B. A number of snake species hide under plants and porches during seasons other than shedding season.
C. During shedding season, the changes that occur in the snakes' shape as seen from overhead do not provide camouflage.
D. The excess skin shed by a live snake during the shedding season may serve as a decoy to lure airborne predators away from the snake's actual body.
E. The majority of animals that attack snakes are airborne predators.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by carcass on 08 Sep 2014, 09:24, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the title of the question

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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2014, 22:45
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Conclusion: snakes hide themselves underneath plants or porches immediately before they shed their skins to escape the notice of airborne predators during shedding season

It means during shedding season, snakes can be seen easily by their predators

Assumption (defender assumption): there is NO way to avoid predators EXCEPT hiding underneath plants or porches. Option C says the changes of snakes' shape during shedding season do NOT help snakes to avoid predators --> It means snakes have to hide themselves underneath plans or porches --> Correct assumption.

Ans is C
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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2014, 23:31
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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hide themselves underneath plants or porches immediately before they shed their skins.
One hypothesis that explains this behavior is that snakes hide to escape the notice of airborne predators during shedding season, when snakes' excess skin increases their visibility to these predators.

The hypothesis above depends on which of the following assumptions?

A. Airborne predators that feed on snakes will seek other prey during shedding season, because they are likely aware that snakes tend to be hidden during this season.[Nope. There can be other possibilities.Flying predators might become more vigilant and would look for snakes under shed etc.]
B. A number of snake species hide under plants and porches during seasons other than shedding season. [irrelevant. or in a way opposite of wht we r looking for.Negate it and its self evident.]
C. During shedding season, the changes that occur in the snakes' shape as seen from overhead do not provide camouflage.[Negate it and u have ur answer.If the shedding skin can provide enough camouflage then no need to take shelter and argument falls.]
D. The excess skin shed by a live snake during the shedding season may serve as a decoy to lure airborne predators away from the snake's actual body.[Nope.If yes, then why do they need to hide?. Opposite of wht we r looking for.]
E. The majority of animals that attack snakes are airborne predators.[Nope.There can be others but arg is concerned abt the flying one only.]
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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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If someone gets confused between C and E, then this statement will help in making things clearer:

One hypothesis that explains this behavior is that snakes hide to escape the notice of airborne predators during shedding season, when snakes' excess skin increases their visibility to these predators.

Here researchers talk only about the airborne predators, so we don't really need option E, which states that the majority of predators must be airborne.

All we need to look for is in the line that says 'snakes hide to escape the notice of airborne predators during shedding season'. And for the answer, we need to explain the reason as to why snakes need to escape from airborne predators in the shedding season. The underlying assumption/reason lies in the option C, that mentions the inability of snakes' shape to provide a camouflage is one sees from above(from the eyes of an airborne predator).

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Re: Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2015, 22:54
I didnt not understand meaning of C ... the word camouflage .. but only this option deals with something about size of snakes and hiding .. so marked it.
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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2015, 14:30
adityadon wrote:
I didnt not understand meaning of C ... the word camouflage .. but only this option deals with something about size of snakes and hiding .. so marked it.


adityadon Well that was a pretty good guess then, I'd say!

Given the stimulus, we need to think of some underlying assumptions. One such assumption would be that there are no camouflage benefits from shedding skin. If Snake hides before shedding to avoid predators, then shedding must not provide benefits to camouflage. That is the underlying assumption being made if the author is to come to the conclusion presented by the stimulus.

I hope that made sense and was helpful.

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Re: Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2016, 05:03
C it is ... well explained in the posts above !
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Re: Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 23:36
but answer C is repeated in the argument..

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Re: Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid   [#permalink] 08 Nov 2017, 23:36
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Researcher: Our latest study indicates that most species of snakes hid

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