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Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm

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Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2010, 04:36
2
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A
B
C
D
E

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Source : GMAT Official Practice Exams 3 & 4

Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm over―possible threats from asteroids, a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.

(A) a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may
(B) a scale that astronomers have developed rates how likely it is for a particular asteroid or comet to
(C) astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to
(D) astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will
(E) astronomers have developed a scale that rates the likelihood of a particular asteroid or comet that may

https://www.nytimes.com/1999/07/27/science/astronomers-adopt-doomsday-index.html

To help deal with public fascination ― and sometimes undue alarm ― about possible threats from asteroids, astronomers have adopted a scale that rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will collide with Earth.
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2010, 12:11
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Hey All,

I got asked to take this one on by private message, so here I am! This one has me a bit confused. I don't see how the OA can be C. Where is this question from?

Responding to the public’s fascination with-and sometimes undue alarm over-possible threats from asteroids, a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.

A. a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may
PROBLEM: "Responding to..." is a participial phrase modifying a noun, so the noun has to come right after the comma. The astronomers responded, not the scale.

B. a scale that astronomers have developed rates how likely it is for a particular asteroid or comet to
PROBLEM: Same as above.

C. astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to
PROBLEM: You can't say "likely...will be to". It's gibberish. Your ear would recognize that if there weren't all those words in between, confusing things. Try a short example. You should always be able to replace "likely" with "probably".

My program determines how likely you will be to love me.
My program determines how probably you will be to love me...MAKES NO SENSE!

D. astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will
ANSWER

E. astronomers have developed a scale that rates the likelihood of a particular asteroid or comet that may
PROBLEM: You can't have a likelihood of something that may happen. It's the likelihood that something WILL happen.

Hope that helps!

-t
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2017, 00:21
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For those who are confused between the options C and D, please read the Ron's explanation below,

Responding to the public’s fascination with-and sometimes undue alarm over-possible threats from asteroids, a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.
C. astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to
D. astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will

In choosing between C and D, first consider the intended meaning. We're interested in the current likelihood that the comet/asteroid will strike Earth in the future..
In other words, How likely is it NOW that a comet/asteroid WILL STRIKE Earth?

This distinction comes into play when you look at the verbs in C and D. Different verbs.

C mentions "how likely a comet/asteroid will be". Nope. The likelihood is something that exists now, not in the future. (That's the definition of "likelihood": How probable does this event seem right now?
There's no "future likelihood" here. In the future, the event either happens or doesn't happen.)

D mentions the likelihood (as measured at present) that a comet/asteroid will collide (in the future) with Earth. That makes sense.
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2010, 02:10
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Hi Tommy, you said that one should always be able to replace likely with probably.
But if you consider the following sentence, the above does not hold true

Courtesy :http://www.yourdictionary.com/examples/likely
He is likely to win the contest
He is probably to win the contest

Also you said
PROBLEM: You can't have a likelihood of something that may happen. It's the likelihood that something WILL happen.
But if you consider the following sentence you will find a few examples where the above does not hold true.
http://www.yourdictionary.com/examples/likelihood

Do search results lead to a likelihood of confusion?
The report notes that recent research has found that programs for offenders with drinking problems can reduce the likelihood of re-offending.
The likelihood of this happening outside three kilometer protection zones is very low.
The output of the risk analysis is an assessment of the likelihood of occurrence for each possible outcome.

Please explain. This is getting murkier. Thank you.
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2010, 09:15
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Hey Zatarra,

First point. There are a few ways to use the word "likely", (one as a fill in for "probably": He is likely going to eat the chicken; one as a fill in for "probably going to": He is likely to eat the chicken; and one a fill-in for simply "probable": "It is likely."), but the sentence above uses it incorrectly in all senses. You can't talk about "how likely X will be to happen." You say "X is likely to happen." Or "Let's see how likely X is to happen." Not WILL BE.

Second point. None of your examples go against what I said. You can't have a likelihood of something THAT MAY HAPPEN. That's how it's put in answer choice E, "the likelihood of X that may happen."

-t
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2010, 10:53
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey Munda,

First point. There are a few ways to use the word "likely", (one as a fill in for "probably": He is likely going to eat the chicken; one as a fill in for "probably going to": He is likely to eat the chicken; and one a fill-in for simply "probable": "It is likely."), but the sentence above uses it incorrectly in all senses. You can't talk about "how likely X will be to happen." You say "X is likely to happen." Or "Let's see how likely X is to happen." Not WILL BE.

Second point. None of your examples go against what I said. You can't have a likelihood of something THAT MAY HAPPEN. That's how it's put in answer choice E, "the likelihood of X that may happen."

-t

Hi tommy so what u mean is that
1) First point "will be " should be avoided
2)Second point "that may" is to avoided
Thanks
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2013, 22:40
This is from the Official GMAT Exam pack 1. The OA is 'D'. 'likelihood that x will do something'. Not 'likelihood of a comet (that may collide). It's not about the likelihood of comet. I think C is wrong because it should be 'to rate / for rating how likely x will do something'. Not 'how likely x will be to do something'.

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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2014, 03:10
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Responding to the public’s fascination with - and sometimes undue alarm over-possible threats from asteroids, a scale
developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.

it will modify a noun-scientist ; further 'likelihood that' -idiom , took 30 second to answer it :)

Hope that helps:)
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2015, 22:23
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Responding to the public’s fascination with - and sometimes undue alarm over-possible threats from asteroids, a scale
developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.

A. a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may >> Wrong modifier
B. a scale that astronomers have developed rates how likely it is for a particular asteroid or comet to >> Wrong modifier
C. astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to >> "to" is wrong
D. astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will >>> correct choice
E. astronomers have developed a scale that rates the likelihood of a particular asteroid or comet that may >> likelihood and may can't be together
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Nov 2017, 18:57
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A quick way..to distinguish C/D/E

C. astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to
Have you ever read/heard anyone say "will be to"? Nope..yea that's because it's purely ungrammatical.
D. astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will
likelihood that a particular asteroid = any potential asteroid (that's coming to get us!)
E. astronomers have developed a scale that rates the likelihood of a particular asteroid or comet that may
likelihood of a particular asteriod = we are only looking at 1 asteroid - KSPHMD1337. Astronomers from MIT are probably smarter than that and it is highly unlikely that they will make a scale JUST to measure 1 asteroid......unless it's the one in The Expanse. :P
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2017, 23:59
The OA is definitely D. aceGMAT21 covers C/D/E very capably, but if you have further questions, ask away.
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2018, 07:48
According to GMATPrep Exam Pack 1, D is correct. But it also includes " for rating ". Isn't that incorrect on GMAT?
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2018, 22:38
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Responding to the public’s fascination with - and sometimes undue alarm over-possible threats from asteroids, a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.

A. a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may - responding seems to modify a scale, implying that A SCALE is responding to the public's fascination. -- Modifier issue
B. a scale that astronomers have developed rates how likely it is for a particular asteroid or comet to - same as A
C. astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to - Here, the future tense is misused.
Incorrect: John will be likely to win the game.
Correct: John IS likely to win the game.
The present tense is required because we calculate likelihoods given information CURRENTLY available.
D. astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will - Correct
E. astronomers have developed a scale that rates the likelihood of a particular asteroid or comet that may - Not the intended meaning: the scale does not rate whether the asteroid ITSELF is likely.
The purpose of the scale is to rate the probability of a future ACTION: whether a particular asteroid WILL COLLIDE with Earth.

Answer D
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2018, 03:37
Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm over―possible threats from asteroids, a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.

(A) a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may --> "Responding to ..." should be followed by the doer of the "Responding" i.e. astronomers : "Responding to ..., astronomers"
(B) a scale that astronomers have developed rates how likely it is for a particular asteroid or comet to
(C) astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to
(D) astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will --> correct
(E) astronomers have developed a scale that rates the likelihood of a particular asteroid or comet that may --> likelihood & may are redundant
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2018, 21:18
goalsnr wrote:
Source : GMAT Official Practice Exams 3 & 4

Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm over―possible threats from asteroids, a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may collide with Earth.

(A) a scale developed by astronomers rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet may
(B) a scale that astronomers have developed rates how likely it is for a particular asteroid or comet to
(C) astronomers have developed a scale to rate how likely a particular asteroid or comet will be to
(D) astronomers have developed a scale for rating the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will
(E) astronomers have developed a scale that rates the likelihood of a particular asteroid or comet that may

https://www.nytimes.com/1999/07/27/science/astronomers-adopt-doomsday-index.html

To help deal with public fascination ― and sometimes undue alarm ― about possible threats from asteroids, astronomers have adopted a scale that rates the likelihood that a particular asteroid or comet will collide with Earth.



Final choice is between D & E.
E do have reasons like likelihood and may cant been used together. But also it doesnt convey the meaning correctly. "that may....." modifies the particular asteroid or comet. So there is no information about what likelihood we are checking in out here.
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2018, 11:54
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anchitahuja wrote:
According to GMATPrep Exam Pack 1, D is correct. But it also includes " for rating ". Isn't that incorrect on GMAT?


I'm interested in hearing anyones view on this point as well? I was under the impression that "for ___ing" was wrong on the GMAT.
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2018, 00:39
scale that rate
is wrong.
scale to do/ scale for doing can be correct depending on idiom. but it is lucky that gmat dont test us this point here.
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Re: Responding to the public’s fascination with―and sometimes undue alarm &nbs [#permalink] 09 Aug 2018, 00:39
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