GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 16 Jul 2018, 05:54

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Sep 2016
Posts: 286
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Nov 2016, 01:14
dear experts,
I am confused by "comma -ed" modifier. appreciate if you can point out my fault and guide that how should we distinguish the modified preceding closest noun/far more preceding noun

so far, what I know is that "comma -ed" modifies the preceding noun or noun phrase.
I will consider prior the closest preceding noun, or I will seek far more preceding noun if no sensible.

1/ preceding closest noun,
in this case, comma shaped modifies wings sensibly, in other words, wings are shaped smoothly and perfectly ... so I won't seek more antecedent.

2/ far more preceding noun
for example,
I read the book on the desk , wrote by Mr. M ..
in this case, comma wrote modifies desk nonsensibly, so I will seek far more antecedent "book"..

that's how I approach "comma -ed"
while I read the whole thread, which says "comma shaped" modifies airplanes.

I think I missed something about "comma - ed".


genuinely want your explanation.

thanks in advance
have a nice day
>_~
Current Student
User avatar
B
Joined: 22 Dec 2014
Posts: 32
Location: India
GMAT 1: 710 Q49 V38
GPA: 3.9
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Nov 2016, 04:22
An easy B,

So X and So Y is an idiom

wings is repeated to ensure no ambiguity as to what so smoothly and so perfectly shaped is referring to..

Also chekout the review on GMAT Practice tests
http://gmatclub.com/forum/all-gmat-cat-practice-tests-links-prices-reviews-77460-620.html#p1758429
Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4667
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Nov 2016, 15:23
zoezhuyan wrote:
dear experts,
I am confused by "comma -ed" modifier. appreciate if you can point out my fault and guide that how should we distinguish the modified preceding closest noun/far more preceding noun

so far, what I know is that "comma -ed" modifies the preceding noun or noun phrase.
I will consider prior the closest preceding noun, or I will seek far more preceding noun if no sensible.

1/ preceding closest noun,
in this case, comma shaped modifies wings sensibly, in other words, wings are shaped smoothly and perfectly ... so I won't seek more antecedent.

2/ far more preceding noun
for example,
I read the book on the desk , wrote by Mr. M ..
in this case, comma wrote modifies desk nonsensibly, so I will seek far more antecedent "book"..

that's how I approach "comma -ed"
while I read the whole thread, which says "comma shaped" modifies airplanes.

I think I missed something about "comma - ed".

genuinely want your explanation.

thanks in advance
have a nice day
>_~

Dear zoezhuyan,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I believe we have already discussed some of this on other posts. The "-ed" modifier is called a past participle, and this is a passive participle. Many many common verbs in English have irregular past participles. For regular verbs, the -ed form is both the past tense and the past participle. For irregular verbs, sometimes the past tense & past participle are the same and sometimes they are not. See that blog article for examples of both.

I will point out a grammar mistake in your example sentence:
I read the book on the desk, wrote by Mr. M ..
This should be
I read the book on the desk, written by Mr. M ..
This is an irregular verb for which the past participle different from the past tense.

I would say that this particular SC question is not of the highest quality. It's not necessarily going to be helpful to learn the subtleties of grammar to use questions that aren't high quality. The official questions are always the best. MGMAT and Magoosh have very good questions, and I have been impressed with many Veritas questions. Don't be naive: don't simply assume, just because some company says "we have good GMAT practice questions," that the questions actually are written at a high level. It's relatively easy to write high quality GMAT math practice questions, but it is exceptionally hard to write high quality GMAT verbal practice questions. Caveat emptor. Be a highly discriminating consumer of GMAT practice verbal questions!

I will also say, as I have said elsewhere: you are looking for fixed rules about things that are determined by logic and meaning. There is no shortcut for engaging with the meaning of a sentence. Depending on context, the participle after the comma may modify the noun it touches or not.

Part of what is a little strange about this is that 90% of the time that a past participle phrase is used as a noun modifier, it is not separated by a comma from its target noun. Again, the sentence in this SC is very poorly written: it is as if the author deliberately bent the sentence out of shape so that he could test the particular grammar point he had in mind.

Example #1: I am reading a book, written by someone in an insane asylum, ironically that won multiple awards.
Example #2: I have a book about penguins, written by a man who lived in Antartica with them for six years!
Example #3: This book is one of my favorites of all time, written by one of my favorite authors.
Depending on meaning, the pattern of modification can vary enormously.

Does all this make sense?

Have a wonderful day, my friend. :-)
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Sep 2016
Posts: 286
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2016, 18:49
mikemcgarry wrote:
zoezhuyan wrote:
dear experts,
I am confused by "comma -ed" modifier. appreciate if you can point out my fault and guide that how should we distinguish the modified preceding closest noun/far more preceding noun

so far, what I know is that "comma -ed" modifies the preceding noun or noun phrase.
I will consider prior the closest preceding noun, or I will seek far more preceding noun if no sensible.

1/ preceding closest noun,
in this case, comma shaped modifies wings sensibly, in other words, wings are shaped smoothly and perfectly ... so I won't seek more antecedent.

2/ far more preceding noun
for example,
I read the book on the desk , wrote by Mr. M ..
in this case, comma wrote modifies desk nonsensibly, so I will seek far more antecedent "book"..

that's how I approach "comma -ed"
while I read the whole thread, which says "comma shaped" modifies airplanes.

I think I missed something about "comma - ed".

genuinely want your explanation.

thanks in advance
have a nice day
>_~

Dear zoezhuyan,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I believe we have already discussed some of this on other posts. The "-ed" modifier is called a past participle, and this is a passive participle. Many many common verbs in English have irregular past participles. For regular verbs, the -ed form is both the past tense and the past participle. For irregular verbs, sometimes the past tense & past participle are the same and sometimes they are not. See that blog article for examples of both.

I will point out a grammar mistake in your example sentence:
I read the book on the desk, wrote by Mr. M ..
This should be
I read the book on the desk, written by Mr. M ..
This is an irregular verb for which the past participle different from the past tense.

I would say that this particular SC question is not of the highest quality. It's not necessarily going to be helpful to learn the subtleties of grammar to use questions that aren't high quality. The official questions are always the best. MGMAT and Magoosh have very good questions, and I have been impressed with many Veritas questions. Don't be naive: don't simply assume, just because some company says "we have good GMAT practice questions," that the questions actually are written at a high level. It's relatively easy to write high quality GMAT math practice questions, but it is exceptionally hard to write high quality GMAT verbal practice questions. Caveat emptor. Be a highly discriminating consumer of GMAT practice verbal questions!

I will also say, as I have said elsewhere: you are looking for fixed rules about things that are determined by logic and meaning. There is no shortcut for engaging with the meaning of a sentence. Depending on context, the participle after the comma may modify the noun it touches or not.

Part of what is a little strange about this is that 90% of the time that a past participle phrase is used as a noun modifier, it is not separated by a comma from its target noun. Again, the sentence in this SC is very poorly written: it is as if the author deliberately bent the sentence out of shape so that he could test the particular grammar point he had in mind.

Example #1: I am reading a book, written by someone in an insane asylum, ironically that won multiple awards.
Example #2: I have a book about penguins, written by a man who lived in Antartica with them for six years!
Example #3: This book is one of my favorites of all time, written by one of my favorite authors.
Depending on meaning, the pattern of modification can vary enormously.

Does all this make sense?

Have a wonderful day, my friend. :-)
Mike :-)


thanks so much , mike
thanks for your paitent.

what i got about your examples is that "written"s modify "book"s. according the meaning.

thanks Mike

have a nice day
>_~
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Jun 2017
Posts: 6
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jul 2017, 12:36
We cannot shape anything smooth.. And the only choice we are left with is : B
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 12 Sep 2016
Posts: 76
Location: India
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
GPA: 3.15
Reviews Badge
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jul 2017, 07:35
Hi, Can an expert please help me out
I just wanted to clarify one thing. Doesn't option B require a semi colon instead of a comma since the 2 sentences are independent clauses?
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4667
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jul 2017, 09:46
1
darn wrote:
Hi, Can an expert please help me out
I just wanted to clarify one thing. Doesn't option B require a semi colon instead of a comma since the 2 sentences are independent clauses?

Dear darn,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

The short answer is: no. The sentence would be incorrect with a semicolon, because in fact there are NOT two independent clauses. What comes before the comma is the only independent clause in the sentence, and what comes after is not an independent clause.

Here's (B).
Since the 1930’s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build airplanes with frictionless wings, wings so smooth and so perfectly shaped that the air passing over them would not become turbulent.

Before the comma, there's a full independent clause, with a subject ("aircraft manufacturers') and a full verb ("have tried").

What comes after the comma is an appositive phrase. It consists of
1) a noun = wings
2) two adjectives in parallel = so smooth and so perfectly shaped
3) an adverbial clause = that the air passing over them would not become turbulent

The adjectives modify the noun, and the adverbial clause modifies the adjectives. The noun "wings" has no corresponding verb, so this is not a clause.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 12 Sep 2016
Posts: 76
Location: India
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
GPA: 3.15
Reviews Badge
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jul 2017, 11:03
mikemcgarry Thanks a lot :)
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 09 Sep 2017
Posts: 12
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Feb 2018, 22:05
(A) wings, shaped so smoothly and perfectly -- perfectly is an adverb but in this sentence after and we have no verb.
(B) wings, wings so smooth and so perfectly shaped --
(C) wings that are shaped so smooth and perfect -- incorrect sholud be smoothly , also this sentence is wordy.
(D) wings, shaped in such a smooth and perfect manner -- smoothly
(E) wings, wings having been shaped smoothly and perfectly so - not required
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 04 Oct 2017
Posts: 39
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Mar 2018, 20:53
rrkan wrote:
Why is "C" an easy elimination. I did not understand


IMO it should be smooth and perfectly shaped not shaped smooth and perfect. Also ..parallelism..so smooth ..so perfectly..
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Sep 2016
Posts: 165
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Apr 2018, 23:10
Ankit04041987 wrote:
651. Since the 1930’s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build airplanes with frictionless wings, shaped so smoothly and perfectly that the air passing over them would not become turbulent.
(A) wings, shaped so smoothly and perfectly
(B) wings, wings so smooth and so perfectly shaped
(C) wings that are shaped so smooth and perfect
(D) wings, shaped in such a smooth and perfect manner
(E) wings, wings having been shaped smoothly and perfectly so


1. Understand the meaning -
Since the 1930's the aircraft manufacturers have tried to build airplanes with frictionless wings. The wings are so smooth and so perfectly shaped that the air passing overten would not become turbulent.

2. Error analysis (on given statement ) -
SV pair - all correct - manufacturers ( plural ) have (plural) , air ( singular ) would (singular here )
Verb tense - all correct - (since ) indicated the the sction is still in effect and usage of " have manufactured " is right as the manufacturers are continuing the plan.
pronoun - that refers to the wings in MC.
Modifier - Error. Here "shaped is a verb-ed modifier " of the noun wings and hence should not be separated by a comma .
Parallelism - all the verbs are parallel. Would not here is also correct as it is an exxpected result.
idiom- no idioms
meaning- error - Incorrectly implies that the airplanes were shaped smoothly and perfectly

3. Ans choice analysis -
A. Above explanation
B. CORRECT. Wings after comma, correctly gives a modified noun to the verb-ed modifier.
C. the word perfect is an adverb and hence should modifiy the verb shaped in the form " perfect-ly".
D.Meaning error- modifier ambiguity.
E.having been is used wrongly. Unnecessary wording.
Re: Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build   [#permalink] 15 Apr 2018, 23:10

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 31 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Since the 1930 s aircraft manufacturers have tried to build

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.