GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 Nov 2018, 21:48

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • How to QUICKLY Solve GMAT Questions - GMAT Club Chat

     November 20, 2018

     November 20, 2018

     09:00 AM PST

     10:00 AM PST

    The reward for signing up with the registration form and attending the chat is: 6 free examPAL quizzes to practice your new skills after the chat.
  • The winning strategy for 700+ on the GMAT

     November 20, 2018

     November 20, 2018

     06:00 PM EST

     07:00 PM EST

    What people who reach the high 700's do differently? We're going to share insights, tips and strategies from data we collected on over 50,000 students who used examPAL.

So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 03 Apr 2007
Posts: 1174
Reviews Badge
So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 26 Oct 2017, 18:11
4
37
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

58% (01:16) correct 42% (01:41) wrong based on 887 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

(A) and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,

(B) and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that

(C) her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that

(D) lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,

(E) so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that

Originally posted by goalsnr on 09 Jul 2008, 21:09.
Last edited by hazelnut on 26 Oct 2017, 18:11, edited 2 times in total.
added oa, format, source!
Most Helpful Expert Reply
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
G
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2746
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Apr 2013, 20:21
17
11
sujit2k7 wrote:
I think this one of the weird GMAT prep questions... no good explanations in any of the forums... if some one can really go on and dissect it rather than just telling E looks better parallel than others , than KUDOS are waiting for him

So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

A. and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,
B. and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that
C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
D. lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,
E. so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that


My question is what is take away from this question. any similar examples.
Do we not need the 'AND' before second SO.
Do we not need the verb in construction E (is ellipses work here..can some one so another example )


Since the questions are pertaining to the structure of the correct choice, I will only take that one in my response.

So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

I will simplify this sentence for my analysis:

So dogged were FP's investigations, so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that AES and FDR recruited Perkins to work within the government.

There are certain specific things about the structure of this sentence.

1: Inverted Structure


If this sentence were written in a more straightforward way, it would be as follows:
FP's investigations of the garment industry were so dogged that AES and FDR recruited Perkins to work within the government.
(notice that I have not considered the second element in this sentence for the sake of explanation. I will consider that in my analysis below:) )
Now to come up with the sentence in question, simply flip the order of the SV in the first clause in the simple sentence above. This will get us to the following version:
So dogged were FP's investigations, that AES and FDR recruited Perkins to work within the government.

2: Idiom used


Let's take the simplified version of the sentence (I will show both inverted and straight sentences)
- FP's investigations of the garment industry were so dogged that AES and FDR recruited Perkins to work within the government.
- So dogged were FP's investigations, that AES and FDR recruited Perkins to work within the government.
So as you can see, the idiom that has been used here is "So x that Y".

3: Two entities connected using a comma


I understand that there are two elements in the list but they have been connected using a comma. Let's consider the straight version of this sentence:
- FP's investigations of the garment industry were so dogged AND her lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent that AES and FDR recruited Perkins to work within the government.
In this version I would have added the second element using an AND.

Now let's consider the inverted structure.
- So dogged were FP's investigations AND so persistent was her lobbying for wage and hour reform that AES and FDR recruited Perkins to work within the government.
Here also I would have added the second element using an AND

So why is there is no AND and a COMMA instead - I do not know. I can almost say that it is a style of writing and certainly not a common style of writing.

4: Ellipsis


As you can see, the second element does not contain a verb. In fact ellipsis is at play here. Here is another sentence with similar ellipsis at play:

Of all the wild animals in their area, none was more useful to the Delaware tribes than the Virginia white- tailed deer: it was a source of meat, and its hide was used for clothing, its antlers and bones were used for tools, and its sinews and gut were used for bindings and glue.

    Notice the verb "was used" in the first element.
    Notice no verb in the second and third elements. But here ellipsis is at play.

Take away

- Follow the process for solving the question. Eliminate choices on deterministic errors and then consider errors such as punctuation etc. Yes, while you are preparing for GMAT, you must understand the construction of the correct sentence, but when you are in test environment, be confident of your approach and do not second guess yourself if questions such as these appear. :)

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Payal
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 150
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Apr 2013, 10:51
3
15
So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

A. and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,
B. and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that
C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
D. lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,
E. so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that




I think this one of the weird GMAT prep questions... no good explanations in any of the forums... if some one can really go on and dissect it rather than just telling E looks better parallel than others , than KUDOS are waiting for him

My question is what is take away from this question. any similar examples.
Do we not need the 'AND' before second SO.
Do we not need the verb in construction E (is ellipses work here..can some one so another example )
_________________

If u can't jump the 700 wall , drill a big hole and cross it .. I can and I WILL DO IT ...need some encouragement and inspirations from U ALL

General Discussion
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Aug 2007
Posts: 678
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2008, 21:58
rishi2377 wrote:
This seems a poor question to me lets see why....

correct idiom is 'so x that ...A,B and D out

now remaining options C and E are awkward for
both lack 'be' verb i.e. 'was'...


anyway if I am forced to pick one that will be E

my query is if
So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
and
So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that

both are run on sentences?


E is correct.

the sentences you mentioned are NOT run on sentences because the clauses are connected by "that"
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 1286
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jul 2008, 09:55
14
2
Like many SC Q's this is a direct pick up from NY Times

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.h ... A965958260

E is correct.

As goalsnr said, So X, So Y that Z is perfectly correct. Other wise NY Times would not use it.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: battlecruiser, operational...
Joined: 25 Apr 2010
Posts: 934
Schools: Carey '16
Re: GMAT Prep 2  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Nov 2010, 21:06
4
tricky. this is one of the reasons why i hate the GMAT.

who talks like "so dogged.....so persistent...., that..." if i talked like that during a interview I would probably be fired. But in GMAT this considered acceptable? Really?
_________________

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Veritas Prep and Orion Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Posts: 313
Re: GMAT Prep 2  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2010, 09:52
4
1
I hear you, vwjetty - but actually this is a fairly common GMAT tactic to frustrate you exactly the way that it did.

Your job on this test is to eliminate the big-picture, common errors (like needing the word "that" to complete the structure "X was so _____ THAT Y happened"), and in order to do so to avoid the temptation to eliminate things just because "they're awkward" or "I would never write it that way".

One way that I've seen them do it a lot is to use "flowery" writing when a sentence is about something historical - they sort of "wax poetic" in a way, which is a valid method of writing in that context. But things like double-negatives (x was not unlike y) drive GMAT students absolutely crazy. Keep in mind that your toolkit for SC questions is composed mainly of:

Subject-Verb Agreement
Verb Tense
Pronoun Agreement
Logical Connectors (like "that" in this case) necessary for sentence structure
Parallelism
Modifiers
Logical Validity (does the sentence even make sense)

Use those tools before you ever worry about awkwardness or "how I'd write it" - if every correct answer were in the form that most of us would write it, it would be too easy a test. Embrace the difficulty - you know better than to worry about awkwardness at first, and that's your competitive advantage over other test-takers who haven't yet found GMATClub and other resources!
_________________

Brian

Curriculum Developer, Instructor, and Host of Veritas Prep On Demand

Save $100 on live Veritas Prep GMAT Courses and Admissions Consulting

Enroll now. Pay later. Take advantage of Veritas Prep's flexible payment plan options.

Veritas Prep Reviews

Veritas Prep and Orion Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Posts: 313
Re: GMAT Prep 2  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2010, 09:56
2
Actually, let me tack on to that just one more point:

I was having lunch with one of our all-time great instructors, Chris, in New York and he mentioned something to the extent that:

Quote:
Taking the official practice tests, I learn a bunch of idioms that I never would have thought would be correct.


Now, what he meant by that was that:

1) Even a guy who has multiple 760+ scores under his belt and who has taught the GMAT for 6 years still doesn't know all the idioms that the GMAT tests.
2) Many of those idioms don't pass the "feel" test - they don't feel correct but they're grammatically acceptable...and that's why the GMAT loves them
3) By using the big-picture strategy he can avoid having to know all of those little things and actually appreciate how awkward those idioms are in that "wow, I never would have picked this answer choice up front but clearly it's right because process-of-elimination shows fatal flaws in the others" way.

So, again, you'll have to learn to sift through some awkwardly-phrased sentences to do well on this test, but know that the bigger guiding principles are your keys to success.
_________________

Brian

Curriculum Developer, Instructor, and Host of Veritas Prep On Demand

Save $100 on live Veritas Prep GMAT Courses and Admissions Consulting

Enroll now. Pay later. Take advantage of Veritas Prep's flexible payment plan options.

Veritas Prep Reviews

Intern
Intern
avatar
Status: INSEAD - Class of July 2013
Joined: 24 Apr 2011
Posts: 5
Concentration: Strategy, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.5
WE: Project Management (Health Care)
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 May 2011, 13:12
skbjunior wrote:
So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

A. and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistet,
B. and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that
C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
D. lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent
E. so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that

Please provide explanation for your answer choice. i will provide OA soon. Thank you!


Answer: E

Not the perfect choice, but certainly the best out of the five. All the other options are either not gramatically correct or lack parallelism.
Parallelism is - "So dogged were [her] investigations, so persistent her lobbying...that"


What's the OA?
VP
VP
avatar
Status: There is always something new !!
Affiliations: PMI,QAI Global,eXampleCG
Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 1040
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 May 2011, 01:21
so dogged ....so persistent ...parallel.

her in possessive form refers to Frances Perkin.

so that is an Idiom too.

E comes clean here.
Current Student
avatar
Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 508
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 May 2011, 01:34
skbjunior wrote:
So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

A. and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistet,
B. and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that
C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
D. lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent
E. so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that

Please provide explanation for your answer choice. i will provide OA soon. Thank you!


Okai .. It is E ( best of the worst for me )
But I have a problem ... WHy is there no 'and' between garment industry and so persistent...and more importantly
why is there a 'comma' before that .. its rubbish
VP
VP
avatar
Status: There is always something new !!
Affiliations: PMI,QAI Global,eXampleCG
Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 1040
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 May 2011, 02:12
1
sudhir18n wrote:

Okai .. It is E ( best of the worst for me )
But I have a problem ... WHy is there no 'and' between garment industry and so persistent...and more importantly
why is there a 'comma' before that .. its rubbish


well there is a slightly deeper rule used over here.

It was with immense ferociousness ,that the lion pounced upon its prey.

Notice the use of adverbial phrase over here describing 'pounced'. The comma separates the phrase from the rest of the sentence.

Similarly comma can be used for appositive phrases,subordinate clauses and because clauses.

Here subordinate clauses are used in particular.
VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Far, far away!
Joined: 02 Sep 2012
Posts: 1073
Location: Italy
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.8
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Apr 2013, 11:10
3
So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

The sentence begins with "So dogged" so we have to complete the idiom with "that": A and D are out.
The right idiom is "so (...) that" not "so (...) so that" as B writes: out B.
Between C and E, I'm afraid to say but it is a parallel problem: the sentence begins with so+adjective E begins with so+adjective, and then copies the entire structure.

C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
E. so persistent(adjective) her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that
_________________

It is beyond a doubt that all our knowledge that begins with experience.

Kant , Critique of Pure Reason

Tips and tricks: Inequalities , Mixture | Review: MGMAT workshop
Strategy: SmartGMAT v1.0 | Questions: Verbal challenge SC I-II- CR New SC set out !! , My Quant

Rules for Posting in the Verbal Forum - Rules for Posting in the Quant Forum[/size][/color][/b]

Board of Directors
User avatar
P
Joined: 01 Sep 2010
Posts: 3306
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Apr 2013, 07:11
sujit2k7 wrote:
I think this one of the weird GMAT prep questions... no good explanations in any of the forums... if some one can really go on and dissect it rather than just telling E looks better parallel than others , than KUDOS are waiting for him

So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

A. and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,
B. and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that
C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
D. lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,
E. so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that




My question is what is take away from this question. any similar examples.
Do we not need the 'AND' before second SO.
Do we not need the verb in construction E (is ellipses work here..can some one so another example )



This sentence is not neither weird nor strange....is only tough. That's it

When a sentence is tough, forget about grammar rules and go straight to the meaning....the only way to overcome the situation and not get lost.

here after comma si not possible to have straight the subject because this not conveyed the sense of the sentence....you need something that relate the first part with the second part.

So you have to use or so that, that or that. B C and E

So that is wrong ...... quite clear. it is weird

her lobbying...........doesnt have any sense

So persistent ............correct because clearly it refers to Perkins.........

E is the best
_________________

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS AND RESOURCES
Quant: 1. ALL GMATPrep questions Quant/Verbal 2. Bunuel Signature Collection - The Next Generation 3. Bunuel Signature Collection ALL-IN-ONE WITH SOLUTIONS 4. Veritas Prep Blog PDF Version 5. MGMAT Study Hall Thursdays with Ron Quant Videos
Verbal:1. Verbal question bank and directories by Carcass 2. MGMAT Study Hall Thursdays with Ron Verbal Videos 3. Critical Reasoning_Oldy but goldy question banks 4. Sentence Correction_Oldy but goldy question banks 5. Reading-comprehension_Oldy but goldy question banks

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 150
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Apr 2013, 21:06
1
but choice E does not have a Verb in it. I discarded it in the first place when i checked So X, So Y, that Z construction.
Can u please help me
_________________

If u can't jump the 700 wall , drill a big hole and cross it .. I can and I WILL DO IT ...need some encouragement and inspirations from U ALL

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1028
Location: United States
Premium Member
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2013, 11:33
sujit2k7 wrote:
but choice E does not have a Verb in it. I discarded it in the first place when i checked So X, So Y, that Z construction.
Can u please help me


Very nice question!.

First, the author used INVERSION construction. You can simply understand the structure is So X, so Y, and X & Y are two clauses. Nope. This is only one sentence. The second part is an absolute construction.

According to Wikipedia:

"In linguistics, an absolute construction is a grammatical construction standing apart from a normal or usual syntactical relation with other words or sentence elements. It can be a non-finite clause that is subordinate in form and modifies an entire sentence, an adjective or possessive pronoun standing alone without a modified substantive, or a transitive verb when its object is implied but not stated.The term absolute derives from Latin absolūtum, meaning "loosened from" or "separated".

Because the non-finite clause, called the absolute clause (or simply the absolute), is not semantically attached to any single element in the sentence, it is easily confused with a dangling participle. The difference is that the participial phrase of a dangling participle is intended to modify a particular noun, but is instead erroneously attached to a different noun, whereas a participial phrase serving as an absolute clause is not intended to modify any noun at all."

Does it help you?.
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 150
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2013, 12:52
@pqhai,
Wow sounds interesting... but actually it was bit too technical . Can you please elaborate using one example.
If i m not wrong u mean the second part "so Y" acts as a absolute phrase modifying the first total clause part 'So X'.
Any other gmat prep sc or og sc that we uses similar tech.
_________________

If u can't jump the 700 wall , drill a big hole and cross it .. I can and I WILL DO IT ...need some encouragement and inspirations from U ALL

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1028
Location: United States
Premium Member
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2013, 13:30
sujit2k7 wrote:
@pqhai,
Wow sounds interesting... but actually it was bit too technical . Can you please elaborate using one example.
If i m not wrong u mean the second part "so Y" acts as a absolute phrase modifying the first total clause part 'So X'.
Any other gmat prep sc or og sc that we uses similar tech.


Hi sujit2k7

Yes, it's quite technical. In fact, absolute construction is difficult to use and is rarely used by GMAC.

You're absolutely right. An absolute construction is a secondary clause in a sentence that modifies the whole meaning of the main clause. Hence, "so Y" construction modifies the first part.
Here is one example: so beautiful her hair, Mary walked down the street.

Hope it helps.
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 31 May 2012
Posts: 10
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Apr 2013, 15:36
sujit2k7 wrote:
I think this one of the weird GMAT prep questions... no good explanations in any of the forums... if some one can really go on and dissect it rather than just telling E looks better parallel than others , than KUDOS are waiting for him

So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

A. and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,
B. and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that
C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
D. lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,
E. so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that




My question is what is take away from this question. any similar examples.
Do we not need the 'AND' before second SO.
Do we not need the verb in construction E (is ellipses work here..can some one so another example )


This indeed is a very difficult question. However, even if you were wondering why there is no "and" rather than a comma as I did, you could have answered the question using process of elimination, and parallelism when you are deciding between C and E. I must say that the way the absolute phrase is used in this sentence is awkward, though grammatically correct.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2013
Posts: 1
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2013, 08:33
raghupara wrote:
chan4312 wrote:
So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her
lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D.
Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social
worker.
A. and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,
no correct idiom..
B. and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that
parallelism fails
C. her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that
correct. parallel ...ans also idiom so.that
D. lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,
parallelism fails
E. so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that
parallelism fails

IMO C


Hi pal,

C cannot be the choice because it uses-'Her' but there is no direct name referent.

Thanks many :) ,
Kudos if clarified!!


'her' is a valid usage in C as its in possessive form. However you cannot use a subject pronoun - 'she'
GMAT Club Bot
Re: So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry &nbs [#permalink] 29 Sep 2013, 08:33

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 37 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

So dogged were Frances Perkin's investigations of the garment industry

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.