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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-

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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 Dec 2018, 22:55
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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-force wind were relentless, the city took nearly a decade to recover from the monumental hurricane that affected not just a region, but an entire nation.


(A) and its gusts of gale-force wind were relentless,

(B) and the gale-force wind gusts were relentless, so that

(C) its gusts of gale-force wind relentless, that

(D) the gale-force winds were gusting so relentlessly,

(E) so relentless its gusts of gale-force wind, that


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Originally posted by souvik101990 on 03 Oct 2014, 18:20.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Dec 2018, 22:55, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2017, 07:06
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The idiomatic template is ---
So + adjective + verb x …. so + adjective (verb expressed or elided))Y, that
So heavy were the storm's rains and hailstones …. so relentless(verb) its gusts of gale-force wind, that
Only E ahs this idiomatic structure
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2014, 19:38
This time it was definitely not so Easy.. :(

Eeeks :? ...I may be wrong this time
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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 Dec 2018, 22:58
itzmyzone911 wrote:
This time it was definitely not so Easy.. :(

Eeeks :? ...I may be wrong this time



Mate, this question is testing idioms and parallelism. Be sure before you mark an answer..

Now that you have quoted me, let me tell you that my answers are hidden inside my remarks..you should have cross-checked the options 2.71 times atleast...sounds wierd? :?: ...think..think.. :lol:

Originally posted by itzmyzone911 on 03 Oct 2014, 22:04.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Dec 2018, 22:58, edited 2 times in total.
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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2014, 23:58
itzmyzone911 wrote:
itzmyzone911 wrote:
This time it was definitely not so Easy.. :(

Eeeks :? ...I may be wrong this time


Mate, this question is testing idioms and parallelism. Be sure before you mark an answer..

Now that you have quoted me, let me tell you that my answers are hidden inside my remarks..you should have cross-checked the options 2.71 times atleast...sounds wierd? :?: ...think..think.. :lol:


Yup got your hidden answer mate, but should not it be only so X that Y rather than so X,so Y that Z...the one enclosed within commas is modifying X....oops did I revealed the concealed ?....it's so covert that it's overt ;)
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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 Dec 2018, 22:59
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PagalGuru wrote:
itzmyzone911 wrote:
Mate, this question is testing idioms and parallelism. Be sure before you mark an answer..

Now that you have quoted me, let me tell you that my answers are hidden inside my remarks..you should have cross-checked the options 2.71 times atleast...sounds wierd? :?: ...think..think.. :lol:


Yup got your hidden answer mate, but should not it be only so X that Y rather than so X,so Y that Z...the one enclosed within commas is modifying X....oops did I revealed the concealed ?....it's so covert that it's overt ;) (..nice one mate :) )


REMEMBER: The correct answer MAY not be the best choice on earth, but will certainly be the best among the five choices given. So do away with the ‘shoulds’ and ‘coulds’ in your mind while judging the five contenders.
THUMB RULE: Ponder over the best choice among the five given, do not ponder over what COULD be the best answer.

Just to address your doubt specifically, note that a single outcome (indicator - 'that') is being described as a result of the intensity (indicator-'so') of two different entities (heavy rains and hailstones’ & ‘relentless gusts’). The author intends to do so by employing two different clauses in a single sentence as opposed to two different sentences altogether. The correct answer serves the purpose well without any idiomatic or grammatical mistake.

Originally posted by itzmyzone911 on 04 Oct 2014, 00:38.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Dec 2018, 22:59, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2015, 10:10
So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-force wind were relentless, the city took nearly a decade to recover from the monumental hurricane that affected not just a region, but an entire nation.

(A) and its gusts of gale-force wind were relentless,.............misses that in so X that Y idiom

(B) and the gale-force wind gusts were relentless, so that...........so is redundant

(C) its gusts of gale-force wind relentless, that..............deviates the meaning from the intended one

(D) the gale-force winds were gusting so relentlessly,...........past continuous tense verb+ing becomes the spoilsport and intended meaning got deviated.

(E) so relentless its gusts of gale-force wind, that........correct choice
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2016, 07:03
I think it is a variation of so -adj -that structure to make this sentence more appealing. For example,
He is so smart that people cannot beat him. We can restructure this:So smart is he that people cannot beat him.
Again, Her voice is so sweet and her expression is so articulate that the audience love to listen her. We can restructure it as: So sweet is her voice, so articulate her expression that the audience love to listen her.
Please add if any correction or modification of my opinion.
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2018, 21:21
I am unable to understand the correct idiom and why choice E is correct inspite of reading all previous explanations on this forum;

my questions: 'Its' is an possessive (singular) pronoun, so what is its referring to in answer choice E? storm's rains and hailstones but isn't this plural?

What is the correct idiom - so X, that Y? OR so X, so Y, that Z ----> (as in choice E)
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2018, 20:03
Could someone explain what "its" is referring to here?
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2018, 09:22
kchen1994 wrote:
Could someone explain what "its" is referring to here?


deddex and kchen1994: here the possessive pronoun "its" refers to storm's. Strom is singular. So this usage is okay. Now, had this been only "it" referring to storm's, the option would have been wrong.

daagh: Please let me know whether we need an "and" between two clauses starting with So - e.g. So xxxx , and so yyyyy , that ZZZZZ.

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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2018, 20:04
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CAn you pl. expand your template into a full sentence. Let's see what follows So?
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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 07 Dec 2018, 23:24
daagh wrote:
Arup

CAn you pl. expand your template into a full sentence. Let's see what follows So?


could you please explain which idiom is preferred ?
Which is preferred here- so X, that Y? OR so X, so Y, that Z ----> (as in choice E)

also is the idiom So X, So Y, That Z always preferred >> over so X, that Y
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Originally posted by deddex on 07 Dec 2018, 22:38.
Last edited by deddex on 07 Dec 2018, 23:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2018, 23:02
daagh wrote:
Arup

CAn you pl. expand your template into a full sentence. Let's see what follows So?


daagh : Sir, my doubt is in the context of this sentence only :


So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and so relentless its gusts of gale-force wind, that, the city took nearly a decade to recover from the monumental hurricane that affected not just a region, but an entire nation.

Do we need "and" (bold) here? and don't we need a verb to make this part a clause - so relentless its gusts of gale-force wind, as we have "were" in the first clause?
Please provide your suggestions.

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So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Dec 2018, 09:21
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Use of 'and' between the two 'SOs' would have been most ideal; Without 'and' it looked as though the author is turning more poetic these days. Whether poetic or not, the author's rhetoric seems to be: After all the first part is a declarative clause but I want to intensify its effect by adding more info in the form of a modifier. So, I am using a modifier, and when I use a modifier you see there is no need to use either a conjunction or a verb. Therefore, what is the point?

One can give a benefit of the doubt for the deliberate missing of the verb 'were' saying that the verb is elided in the second arm, as we already have the same word verbatim in the earlier part.

Incidentally, here is a similar official question in those days that raised a bigger storm and gale wind

Quote:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/so-dogged-were-frances-perkin-s-investigations-of-the-garment-industry-113690.html

So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

(A) and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,

(B) and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that

(C) her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that

(D) lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,

(E) so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that


But the climax is yet to come. This is supposed to be an adaptation of an excerpt from the New York Times.

<http://www.nytimes.com/1993/11/14/books ... -club.html>

and the relevant portion pertaining to Perkins is as follows.

Quote:
So dogged were her investigations of the garment industry, and so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that she was first recruited by Gov. Al Smith, and later by Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt, to work within New York State government, rather than against it.

Strangely, the NYT version contains the all-important 'and', which GMAT woefully has missed.
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Originally posted by daagh on 08 Dec 2018, 05:27.
Last edited by daagh on 08 Dec 2018, 09:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale-  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Dec 2018, 08:58
daagh wrote:
Use of 'and' between the two 'SOs' would have been most ideal; Without 'and' it looked as though the author is turning more poetic these days. Whether poetic or not, the author's rhetoric seems to be: After all the first part is a declarative clause but I want to intensify its effect by adding more info in the form of a modifier. So, I am using a modifier, and when I use a modifier you see there is no need to use neither a conjunction nor a verb. Therefore, what is the point?

One can give a benefit of the doubt for the deliberate missing of the verb 'were' saying that the verb is elided in the second arm, as we already have the same word verbatim in the earlier part.

Incidentally, here is a similar official question in those days that raised a bigger storm and gale wind

Quote:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/so-dogged-were-frances-perkin-s-investigations-of-the-garment-industry-113690.html

So dogged were Frances Perkins’ investigations of the garment industry, and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt recruited Perkins to work within the government, rather than as a social worker.

(A) and her lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent,

(B) and lobbying for wage and hour reform was persistent, so that

(C) her lobbying for wage and hour reform persistent, that

(D) lobbying for wage and hour reform was so persistent,

(E) so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that


But the climax is yet to come. This is supposed to be an adaptation of an excerpt from the New York Times.

<http://www.nytimes.com/1993/11/14/books ... -club.html>

and the relevant portion pertaining to Perkins is as follows.

Quote:
So dogged were her investigations of the garment industry, and so persistent her lobbying for wage and hour reform, that she was first recruited by Gov. Al Smith, and later by Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt, to work within New York State government, rather than against it.

Strangely, the NYT version contains the all-important 'and', which GMAT woefully has missed.


daagh Thank you so much. Nice explanation as always :)

regards,
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Re: So heavy were the storm’s rains and hailstones, and its gusts of gale- &nbs [#permalink] 08 Dec 2018, 08:58
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