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The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for

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The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for those attempting to conquer Mount Everest, the world’s tallest mountain, as more people perished attempting to reach the summit in 2006 than in any other year. Almost all of these deaths occurred in the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet. Oddly, though, the 2006 season enjoyed exceptionally ideal climbing weather compared to more typical years.

Which of the following, if true, best explains the apparent contradiction in the above passage?
a. The warmer the weather, the more likely it is that crevasses (deep holes) will open up unexpectedly in the ice.
B. In 2006, fewer climbing teams than usual were forced to turn back at some point during the ascent prior to reaching the "death-zone."
C. In recent years, more amateurs have attempted to climb the world's great peaks, including Everest.
D. In 2006, authorities suspended climbs due to inclement weather on fewer days than the average for more typical years.
E. Although the 2006 season overall enjoyed ideal weather conditions, the one major storm was one of the worst on record.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2012, 06:29
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Which of the following, if true, best explains the apparent contradiction in the above passage?
a. The warmer the weather, the more likely it is that crevasses (deep holes) will open up unexpectedly in the ice.
warmer or more cold? never mentioned in the argument-only "ideal climbon weather"is mentioned.
B. In 2006, fewer climbing teams than usual were forced to turn back at some point during the ascent prior to reaching the "death-zone."
"fewer" is critical here.More no.of people went for climbing and more no.of people died, so "fewer"of more is how much?
C. In recent years, more amateurs have attempted to climb the world's great peaks, including Everest.
recent years? we are talking about 2006 ONLY.
D. In 2006, authorities suspended climbs due to inclement weather on fewer days than the average for more typical years.
so this could have resulted in fewer deaths,not more.
E. Although the 2006 season overall enjoyed ideal weather conditions, the one major storm was one of the worst on record.
In weakening the argument, we can very well the extreme ACs which provides external info and this suggests the best option.

IMO (E)
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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2012, 07:29
I also think it is B.

a. The warmer the weather, the more likely it is that crevasses (deep holes) will open up unexpectedly in the ice.
Ideal weather not necessarily warm weather. Nowhere is stated that accidents were more frequent on warmer days.
B. In 2006, fewer climbing teams than usual were forced to turn back at some point during the ascent prior to reaching the "death-zone."
More teams went into the "death-zone", more chance for accident. Maybe fewer were forced to turn back if conditions were so good...
C. In recent years, more amateurs have attempted to climb the world's great peaks, including Everest.
Accidents happen also to professionals, no reason to infer that most of the accidents involved amateurs.
D. In 2006, authorities suspended climbs due to inclement weather on fewer days than the average for more typical years.
We are not talking about the daily rate of accidents or something like this.
E. Although the 2006 season overall enjoyed ideal weather conditions, the one major storm was one of the worst on record.
Can we infer that most of the accidents occurred on that specific day of the worst storm?

If conditions almost similar, even "good" weather, and if fewer teams were forced to turn back,
then more teams passed the critical point, hence reasonable more accidents.

What is the source and OA?
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Re: The climbing season [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2012, 09:07
hermit84 wrote:
The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for those attempting to conquer Mount Everest, the
world’s tallest mountain, as more people perished attempting to reach the summit in 2006 than in any other year.
Interestingly, most mountaineering experts attribute the high number of fatalities, almost all of which occurred in
the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet, directly to the exceptionally good weather prevalent during the
2006 climbing season. Which of the following, if true, best helps to explain the conclusion of the mountaineering
experts?
• All of the forecasts were for extremely bad weather; the good weather was a significant surprise to all of the
climbers.
• The good weather prompted significantly more people than ever to try to reach the summit and enter the “deathzone,”
many of whom would have turned back at a lower altitude in poorer weather.
• The good weather caused the “death-zone” to have warmer temperatures and less intense winds than in recent
years.
• Modern equipment is particularly effective in protecting climbers from the elements in bad weather.
• Many accomplished climbers don’t attempt Mt. Everest during good weather because they feel it is not a challenge.


More people died despite good weather - Only B gives a good explanation for this. Number of people tried to reach summit and entered the dreaded 'death zone' because of good weather. So one, we have a bigger pool and two, we have bigger pool of people not conditioned to such zones. This explaines why number of deaths was high in 2006.

Ans B it is.
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Re: The climbing season [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2012, 09:19
Vips0000 wrote:
hermit84 wrote:
The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for those attempting to conquer Mount Everest, the
world’s tallest mountain, as more people perished attempting to reach the summit in 2006 than in any other year.
Interestingly, most mountaineering experts attribute the high number of fatalities, almost all of which occurred in
the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet, directly to the exceptionally good weather prevalent during the
2006 climbing season. Which of the following, if true, best helps to explain the conclusion of the mountaineering
experts?
• All of the forecasts were for extremely bad weather; the good weather was a significant surprise to all of the
climbers.
• The good weather prompted significantly more people than ever to try to reach the summit and enter the “deathzone,”
many of whom would have turned back at a lower altitude in poorer weather.
• The good weather caused the “death-zone” to have warmer temperatures and less intense winds than in recent
years.
• Modern equipment is particularly effective in protecting climbers from the elements in bad weather.
• Many accomplished climbers don’t attempt Mt. Everest during good weather because they feel it is not a challenge.


More people died despite good weather - Only B gives a good explanation for this. Number of people tried to reach summit and entered the dreaded 'death zone' because of good weather. So one, we have a bigger pool and two, we have bigger pool of people not conditioned to such zones. This explaines why number of deaths was high in 2006.

Ans B it is.


B it is, too.

In stimulus:
X -> Y
Good weather -> More entrants in dead zone?

B is a missing assumption that affirms the conclusion.
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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2013, 11:05
hermit84 wrote:
The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for those attempting to conquer Mount Everest, the
world’s tallest mountain, as more people perished attempting to reach the summit in 2006 than in any other year.
Interestingly, most mountaineering experts attribute the high number of fatalities, almost all of which occurred in
the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet, directly to the exceptionally good weather prevalent during the
2006 climbing season. Which of the following, if true, best helps to explain the conclusion of the mountaineering
experts?
• All of the forecasts were for extremely bad weather; the good weather was a significant surprise to all of the
climbers.
• The good weather prompted significantly more people than ever to try to reach the summit and enter the “deathzone,”
many of whom would have turned back at a lower altitude in poorer weather.
• The good weather caused the “death-zone” to have warmer temperatures and less intense winds than in recent
years.
• Modern equipment is particularly effective in protecting climbers from the elements in bad weather.
• Many accomplished climbers don’t attempt Mt. Everest during good weather because they feel it is not a challenge.


Chose (B) on this one, but had to think a little bit between A and B. Comparing both answers, (B) does a better job explaining the conclusion. Nevertheless, is there a clear reason on why (A) is wrong. If climbers were not prepared accordingly (maybe they had equipment for bad weather) which is not useful or can decrease their chances of surviving under other conditions, they could have also been prone to more fatalities right?
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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2014, 10:42
monir6000 wrote:
The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for those attempting to conquer Mount Everest, the world’s tallest mountain, as more people perished attempting to reach the summit in 2006 than in any other year. Almost all of these deaths occurred in the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet. Oddly, though, the 2006 season enjoyed exceptionally ideal climbing weather compared to more typical years.

Which of the following, if true, best explains the apparent contradiction in the above passage?
a. The warmer the weather, the more likely it is that crevasses (deep holes) will open up unexpectedly in the ice.
B. In 2006, fewer climbing teams than usual were forced to turn back at some point during the ascent prior to reaching the "death-zone."
C. In recent years, more amateurs have attempted to climb the world's great peaks, including Everest.
D. In 2006, authorities suspended climbs due to inclement weather on fewer days than the average for more typical years.
E. Although the 2006 season overall enjoyed ideal weather conditions, the one major storm was one of the worst on record.


I though the answer was D. If authorities suspended climbing on fewer days because of the better weather then more people actually climbed and so we can expect that even with the same probability of deaths, the number of deaths will be higher. Plus, the answer choice attacks both sides of the question, the subject about deaths as well as the weather which is very convincing in correct answer choices for paradox questions. Anyways, answer as stated above is B, which I had as contender but discarded because it didn't actually deal with the problem of the weather so it didn't really explain the whole paradox

Just my 2c
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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2014, 20:53
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If you look at the stem, it's mentioned that Oddly, though, the 2006 season enjoyed exceptionally ideal climbing weather compared to more typical years. Thus, even if on fewer days climbs are suspended, it doesn't really explain our conclusion i.e. Almost all of these deaths occurred in the unforgiving“death-zone” above 26,000 feet.

Option B states that more climbing teams entered the "death-zone" compared to previous years. So we can expect that more people perished in attempting to reach the summit.

jlgdr wrote:
monir6000 wrote:
The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for those attempting to conquer Mount Everest, the world’s tallest mountain, as more people perished attempting to reach the summit in 2006 than in any other year. Almost all of these deaths occurred in the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet. Oddly, though, the 2006 season enjoyed exceptionally ideal climbing weather compared to more typical years.

Which of the following, if true, best explains the apparent contradiction in the above passage?
a. The warmer the weather, the more likely it is that crevasses (deep holes) will open up unexpectedly in the ice.
B. In 2006, fewer climbing teams than usual were forced to turn back at some point during the ascent prior to reaching the "death-zone."
C. In recent years, more amateurs have attempted to climb the world's great peaks, including Everest.
D. In 2006, authorities suspended climbs due to inclement weather on fewer days than the average for more typical years.
E. Although the 2006 season overall enjoyed ideal weather conditions, the one major storm was one of the worst on record.


I though the answer was D. If authorities suspended climbing on fewer days because of the better weather then more people actually climbed and so we can expect that even with the same probability of deaths, the number of deaths will be higher. Plus, the answer choice attacks both sides of the question, the subject about deaths as well as the weather which is very convincing in correct answer choices for paradox questions. Anyways, answer as stated above is B, which I had as contender but discarded because it didn't actually deal with the problem of the weather so it didn't really explain the whole paradox

Just my 2c
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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2014, 04:24
B it is.

The question states "almost all the deaths occurred in the death-zone".

Between B and D. B gives us clear reason that many people entered into death-zone Thus we can deduce why more number of people died. D means more people may have started the climb but nothing about them entering the death-zone.
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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2017, 18:13
Merging topics. Please, search questions before creating a discussion!

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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2017, 12:19
The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for those attempting to conquer Mount Everest, the world’s tallest mountain, as more people perished attempting to reach the summit in 2006 than in any other year. Almost all of these deaths occurred in the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet. Oddly, though, the 2006 season enjoyed exceptionally ideal climbing weather compared to more typical years.

Point is-
Almost all of these deaths occurred in the unforgiving “death-zone” above 26,000 feet
Suggest that- deaths almost did not occur before death zone.


Which of the following, if true, best explains the apparent contradiction in the above passage?
a. The warmer the weather, the more likely it is that crevasses (deep holes) will open up unexpectedly in the ice.
B. In 2006, fewer climbing teams than usual were forced to turn back at some point during the ascent prior to reaching the "death-zone."

fewer climbing teams than usual were forced to turn back before death zone.
So it resulted into more people enter death zone and allowed more deaths in death zone.

Correct

C. In recent years, more amateurs have attempted to climb the world's great peaks, including Everest.
D. In 2006, authorities suspended climbs due to inclement weather on fewer days than the average for more typical years.
E. Although the 2006 season overall enjoyed ideal weather conditions, the one major storm was one of the worst on record.
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Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2017, 08:46
can someone please explain why is ans B and not E??
I was confused between the two.

Thanks in advance.
Re: The climbing season of 2006 was the deadliest on record for   [#permalink] 21 Jun 2017, 08:46
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