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The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect

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The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 04 Oct 2017, 02:36
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The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect of large labor shortages in the decades ahead. Meanwhile, these countries will have a vast number of experienced and productive older workers who, as things stand, will be driven from the work force upon reaching the age of sixty-five by the widespread practice of requiring workers to retire at that age. Therefore, if the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age sixty-five were eliminated, the labor shortages facing these economies would be averted.

The argument assumes that

A. older workers have acquired skills that are extremely valuable and that their younger colleagues lack

B. workers in industrialized countries are often unprepared to face the economic consequences of enforced idleness

C. a large number of workers in some industrialized countries would continue working beyond the age of sixty-five if workers in those countries were allowed to do so

D. mandatory retirement at age sixty-five was first instituted when life expectancy was considerable lower than it is today

E. a substantial proportion of the population of officially retired workers is actually engaged in gainful employment

Source: LSAT

Originally posted by Vyshak on 23 Feb 2016, 03:51.
Last edited by broall on 04 Oct 2017, 02:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2016, 11:33
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Vyshak wrote:
The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect of large labor shortages in the decades ahead. Meanwhile, these countries will have a vast number of experienced and productive older workerswho, as things stand, will be driven from the work force upon reaching the age of sixty-five by the widespread practice of requiring workers to retire at that age. Therefore,if the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age sixty-five were eliminated, the labor shortages facing these economies would be averted.




The argument assumes that -

A. older workers have acquired skills that are extremely valuable and that their younger colleagues lack

The stimulus talks about experience ad productivity of the workers.

B. workers in industrialized countries are often unprepared to face the economic consequences of enforced idleness


Out of scope.

C. a large number of workers in some industrialized countries would continue working beyond the age of sixty-five if workers in those countries were allowed to do so

Try to negate this option thee argument falls apart.

If a small number of workers in some industrialized countries continue working beyond the age of sixty-five then labor shortage would not be averted.

D. mandatory retirement at age sixty-five was first instituted when life expectancy was considerable lower than it is today

Out of scope.


E. a substantial proportion of the population of officially retired workers is actually engaged in gainful employment

Out of scope.


Hence IMHO (C)


Option (A) might look close but it is nowhere mentioned in the passage hence can be negated.
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Re: The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2016, 23:42
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The argument concludes that if the discriminatory practice of retirement at age sixty five is discarded the labor shortages of these economies would be averted. The author therefore assumes that workers would be willing to work even at the age of sixty five if the economies allow them to do so. The assumption is clearly stated in "C". If the statement in "C" is negated then the statement in reversed form goes against the conclusion.
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Re: The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2016, 01:41
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Vyshak wrote:
The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect of large labor shortages in the decades ahead. Meanwhile, these countries will have a vast number of experienced and productive older workers who, as things stand, will be driven from the work force upon reaching the age of sixty-five by the widespread practice of requiring workers to retire at that age. Therefore, if the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age sixty-five were eliminated, the labor shortages facing these economies would be averted.

The argument assumes that

The premise tells us that:
1. There will be a shortage of workforce in the future
2. There is a mandatory retirement age of 65 years
3. If the mandatory retirement is removed, there will be no shortage.

This directly means that the underlying assumption is "If the people are not asked to retire, they will not retire and continue working"
Of the given options, Option C says the same
C. a large number of workers in some industrialized countries would continue working beyond the age of sixty-five if workers in those countries were allowed to do so

Correct Option: C
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The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2019, 09:59
Vyshak wrote:
The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect of large labor shortages in the decades ahead. Meanwhile, these countries will have a vast number of experienced and productive older workers who, as things stand, will be driven from the work force upon reaching the age of sixty-five by the widespread practice of requiring workers to retire at that age. Therefore, if the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age sixty-five were eliminated, the labor shortages facing these economies would be averted.

The argument assumes that

A. older workers have acquired skills that are extremely valuable and that their younger colleagues lack

B. workers in industrialized countries are often unprepared to face the economic consequences of enforced idleness

C. a large number of workers in some industrialized countries would continue working beyond the age of sixty-five if workers in those countries were allowed to do so

D. mandatory retirement at age sixty-five was first instituted when life expectancy was considerable lower than it is today

E. a substantial proportion of the population of officially retired workers is actually engaged in gainful employment

Source: LSAT


Conclusion -> Therefore, if the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age sixty-five were eliminated, the labor shortages facing these economies would be averted.

These means inline here
The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect of large labor shortages in the decades ahead.

Conclusion will mean that
If the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age sixty-five were eliminated, less labor shortages will be there

C) a large number of workers in some industrialized countries would continue working beyond the age of sixty-five if workers in those countries were allowed to do so

Author is assuming this, what if they dont want to work, this will weaken the conclusion.
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Re: The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2019, 00:30
The author concludes that if the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age of sixty five is eliminated, the labor shortage problem will be solved.

Consider a scenario in which the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age of sixty five is eliminated and workers are allowed to work till they die. In such scenario what if the labor themselves are not interested to work. In this case author's conclusion will break.

Hence, author's assumptions can be: the labor will be interested to continue working if the discriminatory practice of mandatory retirement at age of sixty five is eliminated

Answer: C
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Re: The economies of some industrialized countries face the prospect   [#permalink] 19 Feb 2019, 00:30
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