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The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not

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The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?

(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?

(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?

(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?

(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?

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Originally posted by leonidas on 29 Sep 2008, 11:11.
Last edited by hazelnut on 12 May 2018, 02:19, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2015, 21:11
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This question is part of the GMAT Club Critical Reasoning : Evaluate" Revision Project.

The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music. The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

A. Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?

B. Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?

C. Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?

D. Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?

E. Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 30 Sep 2008, 01:41
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


IMO E

A close call between B & E. But when we talk specifically about conclusion, E makes more sense. Also identifying minority wont be helpful. Its prosecuting thats helpful.

Originally posted by jatinrai on 29 Sep 2008, 11:26.
Last edited by jatinrai on 30 Sep 2008, 01:41, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 12:33
jatinrai wrote:
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


IMO E

A close call between C & E. But when we talk specifically about conclusion, E makes more sense. Also identifying minority wont be helpful. Its prosecuting thats helpful.


To me, it was between B & E. C was never in contention. I ended up choosing B, because if they can identify the small minority who are responsible, illegal download will stop. Thats where I went wrong and when I re read the conclusion its about people who illegally download and not who are responsible for such outlets. So E, in hind sight is a better answer.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 29 Sep 2008, 15:57
definately E

The conclusion is that "the recording industry is fighting a losing battle". The premises include "not enough resources to prosecute" and "number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact "

so if "the threat of prosecution alters the behavior of those who illegally download music" then the resources are not needed and the recording industry needs no further action

Originally posted by bigtreezl on 29 Sep 2008, 15:50.
Last edited by bigtreezl on 29 Sep 2008, 15:57, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 20:14
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


I picked (B) which is incorrect according to MGMAT. OA is (E).
Here is my explanation:
On the exam day, I would have picked (B) because: If small minority of individuals are responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads and these individuals are charged, then the actions of the recording industry will have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music. This actually affectcs the accuracy of the conclusion which states that- the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading.

Here is the official explanation from MGMAT:
(E) CORRECT. The argument concludes that the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading. However, if the threat of prosecution were enough to “alter the behavior” of others (i.e., deter them from illegally downloading music), the actions of the recording industry could have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 20:23
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leonidas wrote:
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


I picked (B) which is incorrect according to MGMAT. OA is (E).
Here is my explanation:
On the exam day, I would have picked (B) because: If small minority of individuals are responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads and these individuals are charged, then the actions of the recording industry will have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music. This actually affectcs the accuracy of the conclusion which states that- the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading.

Here is the official explanation from MGMAT:
(E) CORRECT. The argument concludes that the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading. However, if the threat of prosecution were enough to “alter the behavior” of others (i.e., deter them from illegally downloading music), the actions of the recording industry could have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music.


I agree that this Q is a little bit tricky. I guess the reason why MGMAT chose to drop B is because, we dont know whether the resources are enough to sue them (who knows) and also some other small group else might do it again, if they dont feel the threat. The point I guess is will it make a threat or not. Again, we can talk about both of them and to me B was correct to start with. B says majority of the illegal downloads can be attributed to a small group and suing them can definitely have a positive impact and reduce the illegal downloads.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 01:41
icandy wrote:
jatinrai wrote:
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


IMO E

A close call between C & E. But when we talk specifically about conclusion, E makes more sense. Also identifying minority wont be helpful. Its prosecuting thats helpful.


To me, it was between B & E. C was never in contention. I ended up choosing B, because if they can identify the small minority who are responsible, illegal download will stop. Thats where I went wrong and when I re read the conclusion its about people who illegally download and not who are responsible for such outlets. So E, in hind sight is a better answer.

Sorry even I meant between B & E. Edited
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2010, 05:24
Is the answer E ?


What we are trying to establish is : whether the prosecution will have the desired effects

E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music? --> the answer to this question answer our original quesiton ...if the threat alters behavior of most of the people then this will have the desired results ...i.e. stopping illegal downloads
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2010, 14:50
IMO E,

If the answer to E is yes, it will weaken the conclusion and if the ans is No, it will strengthen.

B is wrong because, even if 2 out of 10 are responsible for illegal downloads, our concerns is how their number can be reduced. What should cause the reduction.

C is wrong for the same reason. we need the cause of reduction.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2010, 01:46
OA is E and OE is:

(E) CORRECT. The argument concludes that the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading. However, if the threat of prosecution were enough to “alter the behavior” of others (i.e., deter them from illegally downloading music), the actions of the recording industry could have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

Argument say:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2011, 10:39
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E for me...
For evaluate the conclusion questions follow the approach given by the CR bible...
Scan the options first...
A and D are out because they are out of scope....
Now for the remaining choices, take a yes and no as the answer to the question and check whether " answer yes" is strengthening the conclusion and "Answer No" is weakening the conclusion or vice versa...

We can eliminate B and C through the above process...
For E..

Answer Yes: It will alter the behaviour of the individuals
Answer No: It will not alter the behavior of the individuals

Yes weakens the conclusion and No strengthens the conclusion... Thus this is our option....

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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2011, 01:21
the argument concentrates on the impact of such action.
Between C and E.

C gives a probable reason why only small number of people will be charged for such a crime.However, provides no support to the impact.

E gives a clear indication on the impact by using variance test here.

E it is.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2011, 12:19
I believe it's (E).
We're asked about "impact on the number of people".
The answer to the last question will help to evaluate whether the number of people downloading illegally is going down.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2011, 12:46
sushbis wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

a>Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?

b>Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?

c> Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?

d>Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?

e>Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


Conclusion: The actions(of prosecuting) of the recording industry will have a minimal impact.
Reasoning: Because the number of illegal down-loaders is less.

C says: Don't go just by the number of illegal down-loaders. Because, if the illegal down-loaders share the music with 1000 others, the impact will be great.

E: also is okay to an extent. But, the conclusion didn't seem to undermine the impact of prosecution anyway.

Ans: "C"
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2011, 18:28
I would go with B.

Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
If the answer is yes, than the battle is not a losing one, as prosecuting them will cover most of the illegal downloads.

If the answer is no, then the battle is indeed a loosing one.


What is the OA?


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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2011, 00:29
here the conclusion is "Recording industry is fighting loosing battle"

Other part is the evidence.

Answer choice B will be the one.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2011, 00:36
a>Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?OOS

b>Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?Already given

c> Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?correct

d>Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?Irrelevant

e>Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?OOS
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 06:53
I am going with E. Think about it:

Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

We need to stop illegal downloads. There are a large number of people who download music illegally. But we can prosecute only a limited number of them.

So the questions becomes: what can we do to these limited number of downloaders so as to stop others from downloading? Prosecute them. That means E.
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 08:18
I am not able to decide between B and E. can the person who posted the question explain the answer
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Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not &nbs [#permalink] 21 Jun 2011, 08:18

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