GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 23 Oct 2018, 09:11

LIVE NOW!

How to Manage Stress and Anxiety on the GMAT - Live Chat.


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 22 Jun 2016
Posts: 246
Reviews Badge
Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2016, 07:19
4
11
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

49% (00:44) correct 51% (01:00) wrong based on 270 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court, is credited with having had an important role in beginning the de facto desegregation of America's schools by successfully litigating the landmark case Brown vs. Board of Education.

A. with having had
B. for its having
C. to have had
D. for having
E. in that it had

_________________

P.S. Don't forget to give Kudos :)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 22 Jun 2016
Posts: 246
Reviews Badge
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2016, 07:22
sayantanc2k
Aren't credited for and credited with both idiomatically correct?
And if yes, then why is D wrong?
_________________

P.S. Don't forget to give Kudos :)

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2015
Posts: 27
Location: India
Concentration: Other
GMAT 1: 720 Q50 V38
GPA: 2.9
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2016, 07:36
1
"credited with" is the correct idiom..
'it' incorrectly refers to a person..
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2016
Posts: 43
Location: China
Concentration: Finance, Nonprofit
GMAT 1: 680 Q49 V33
GMAT 2: 690 Q51 V31
GMAT 3: 710 Q50 V36
GPA: 3.4
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2016, 07:44
go for D.

How abt the sense? A uses present perfect while D uses present tense.
_________________

It's better to burn out than to fade away.

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Feb 2013
Posts: 1
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2016, 11:04
D is correct .


Found this on Web..
[*]credit Somebody with Something (verb): give responsibility for. Thomas Edison is credited with inventing the light bulb.

[*]credit X to Y (verb): give money or credit to. The bank credited $1 million to trebla's account.

[*]credit for (noun): money received for or in exchange for something. The customer received a $20 credit for the interruption in service.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 22 Jun 2016
Posts: 246
Reviews Badge
Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 17 Jul 2016, 23:49
1
3
IMO the explanation could be the following:

CREDIT FOR is correct when "credit" is not the verb, as in He got credit for my hard work or She received credit for her years of service.

Credited for : when credit is not a verb but a noun.
For example: she received credit for her good work.
In the question, credited is used as a verb so we can't use 'credit for' here.

Credited to is used when Credit is used as a verb: 'Credit X to Y'. Eg: The bank credited $1 billion to your account.

Credited with is used when Credit is used as verb: 'Credited Someone with something'. Eg: Your account has been credited with $1 billion.

In the above question, credit(ed) is used as a verb, the idiom in English is to credit something with having had some effect. Thus only choice A is idiomatic. Both/or (in B and D) and to (in C) can be used idiomatically when credit is a noun, as in "Thurgood Marshall gave credit to US art for having had a strong influence on his work." The verb form having had is used appropriately in choice A to indicate action that occurred prior to action expressed in the simple past tense--that is, to indicate that US art had influenced Thurgood Marshall before he credited it with having done so.

Hence, the answer would be A.
_________________

P.S. Don't forget to give Kudos :)


Originally posted by 14101992 on 17 Jul 2016, 23:22.
Last edited by 14101992 on 17 Jul 2016, 23:49, edited 3 times in total.
Retired Moderator
avatar
G
Joined: 26 Nov 2012
Posts: 593
Premium Member
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2016, 23:28
14101992 wrote:
Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court, is credited with having had an important role in beginning the de facto desegregation of America's schools by successfully litigating the landmark case Brown vs. Board of Education.

A. with having had
B. for its having
C. to have had
D. for having
E. in that it had


Meaning : TM, the first AA and he is credited with an important role that he played in the beginning of America's schools for doing some litigation .

Credit with / for means to give someone or something well-deserved praise for doing something or having something.

Here having had means that he played an important role earlier and still he plays it. So, he is credited with an important role.

For having means he would have possessed something recently.

Thus we can say option A is correct.
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2016
Posts: 43
Location: China
Concentration: Finance, Nonprofit
GMAT 1: 680 Q49 V33
GMAT 2: 690 Q51 V31
GMAT 3: 710 Q50 V36
GPA: 3.4
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2016, 23:33
14101992 wrote:
IMO the explanation could be the following:

CREDIT FOR is correct when "credit" is not the verb, as in He got credit for my hard work or She received credit for her years of service.

Credited for : when credit is not a verb but a noun.
For example: she received credit for her good work.
In the question, credited is used as a verb so we can't use 'credit for' here.

Credited to is used when Credit is used as a verb: 'Credit X to Y'. Eg: The bank credited $1 billion to your account.

Credited with is used when Credit is used as verb: 'Credited Someone with something'. Eg: Your account has been credited with $1 billion.

In the above question, credit(ed) is used as a verb, the idiom in English is to credit something with having had some effect. Thus only choice A is idiomatic. Both/or (in B and D) and to (in C) can be used idiomatically when credit is a noun, as in "Thurgood Marshall gave credit to US art for having had a strong influence on his work." The verb form having had is used appropriately in choice A to indicate action that occurred prior to action expressed in the simple past tense--that is, to indicate that US art had influenced Thurgood Marshall before he credited it with having done so.

Hence, the answer would be A.



Thanks much.

I found another Q of OG 16 SC mentioning "credit for":
Last week local shrimpers held a news conference to take some credit for the resurgence of the rare Kemp’s ridley turtle, saying that their compliance with laws requiring turtle-excluder devices on shrimp nets is protecting.
here "credit" is noun.

Best,
_________________

It's better to burn out than to fade away.

Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3018
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2016, 12:50
2
2
14101992 wrote:
sayantanc2k
Aren't credited for and credited with both idiomatically correct?
And if yes, then why is D wrong?


"Credited with" is correct; "credited for" is wrong.

The following is an excerpt from manhattan SC guide (Idioms chapter):

Correct:
Hugo CREDITS Sally WITH good taste.
Sally IS CREDITED WITH good taste.

Wrong:
Sally IS CREDITED FOR good taste (or FOR HAVING good taste).
Sally IS CREDITED AS a person with good taste (or AS HAVING good taste).
Sally IS CREDITED TO BE a person with good taste.
Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 3238
Premium Member
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Sep 2018, 23:50
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court &nbs [#permalink] 21 Sep 2018, 23:50
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American on the Supreme Court

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.