It is currently 13 Dec 2017, 11:02

Decision(s) Day!:

CHAT Rooms | Ross R1 | Kellogg R1 | Darden R1 | Tepper R1


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4551

Kudos [?]: 8951 [0], given: 111

Re: Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Sep 2017, 18:20
harshdeep12 wrote:
mikemcgarry: Dear Mike, How are you? Just had a question on this, so please see below. I have modified option E to understand if there are any other relevant problems in the sentence:

As a novelist, Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer who won the Nobel Price for Literature- I replaced "that" with "who" here to remove the obvious error. In this sentence, are we still losing the crux that she was the first woman to do something OR is the construction She was the first woman who did X equally correct in conveying a particular sense of meaning. Are there any other existing errors sill in the sentence?

FOR EXAMPLE
A)Harsh was the first person to climb Mount Everest
B)Harsh was the first person who climbed Mount Everest

Is there any difference in the meaning conveyed by the 2 sentences above( This is the exact concern I am trying to raise in the setence above). Many Thanks

Dear harshdeep12,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

With that change, (E) is grammatically correct but still not ideal. Rhetorically, among other things, it's odd to make the information in the first part the main clause, and relegate the information about winning a Nobel Prize to a participial phrase. The most important idea should be grammatically central in the sentence.

Your two example sentence about Everest have the same meaning, but you really slighted Sir Edmund Hillary!

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Kudos [?]: 8951 [0], given: 111

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Mar 2016
Posts: 7

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 4

GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V31
CAT Tests
Re: Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Oct 2017, 01:23
mikemcgarry wrote:
harshdeep12 wrote:
mikemcgarry: Dear Mike, How are you? Just had a question on this, so please see below. I have modified option E to understand if there are any other relevant problems in the sentence:

As a novelist, Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer who won the Nobel Price for Literature- I replaced "that" with "who" here to remove the obvious error. In this sentence, are we still losing the crux that she was the first woman to do something OR is the construction She was the first woman who did X equally correct in conveying a particular sense of meaning. Are there any other existing errors sill in the sentence?

FOR EXAMPLE
A)Harsh was the first person to climb Mount Everest
B)Harsh was the first person who climbed Mount Everest

Is there any difference in the meaning conveyed by the 2 sentences above( This is the exact concern I am trying to raise in the setence above). Many Thanks

Dear harshdeep12,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

With that change, (E) is grammatically correct but still not ideal. Rhetorically, among other things, it's odd to make the information in the first part the main clause, and relegate the information about winning a Nobel Prize to a participial phrase. The most important idea should be grammatically central in the sentence.

Your two example sentence about Everest have the same meaning, but you really slighted Sir Edmund Hillary!

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

I have a question regarding redundancy in the options 'D' and 'E'.

Isn't the pair 'And-Also' redundant. If that is the case, then I feel that none of the options are correct.

Can you please confirm regarding the usage of 'and-also'

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 4

Re: Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the   [#permalink] 31 Oct 2017, 01:23

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   [ 42 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.