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Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an

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Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an unwillingness on the part of many people to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated.


a) Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an unwillingness on the part of many people to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated

b) Many people, willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be fully domesticated, are unwilling to believe the same of pit bulls.

c) Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, pit bulls bring out an unwillingness in many people to believe that they might be fully domesticated.

d) Many people are unwilling to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated even while they are willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be.

e) Unlike German shepherds and Doberman pinchers, which many people are willing to believe can be fully domesticated, such belief does not extend to pit bulls.

Originally posted by tarek99 on 06 Jul 2008, 12:31.
Last edited by Bunuel on 31 Jul 2018, 06:43, edited 2 times in total.
Added OA.
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2008, 18:12
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a) Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an unwillingness on the part of many people to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated

Compares GS & DB with unwillingness.

b) Many people, willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be fully domesticated, are unwilling to believe the same of pit bulls.

Concise and remove the Dependent clause in between. The sentence reads just fine.



c) Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, pit bulls bring out an unwillingness in many people to believe that they might be fully domesticated.

Comparison is good but pit bulls do not bring out any thing as per the Original sentence.


d) Many people are unwilling to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated even while they are willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be.

I am not aware of whether while is almost always wrong on GMAT. But sure does have issues with conciseness and clarity

e) Unlike German shepherds and Doberman pinchers, which many people are willing to believe can be fully domesticated, such belief does not extend to pit bulls.

Wrong comparsion
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2008, 21:27
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B.

in C, the "they" is ambiguous because it can refer to the people themselves.
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2014, 10:48
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D seems wrong
D says :Many people are unwilling to believe that pit pulls might be fully domesticated even while they are willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be
D uses a construction "even while". this construction seems wrong .we can use either "even though" or "while" to bring about contrast but not "even while"
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2014, 16:22
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"Even while" is not quite right--it implies that these things are happening at the same time, when the point is to make a clear contrast. However, even if we used "even though," we would not have a great answer choice. Notice that the sentence ends with the unclear "might be." We know the intention is "might be domesticated," but it's better to choose a sentence that makes the point more clearly.

For me, though, the worst part is "domesticated even while." We seem to be modifying "domesticated" instead of the belief, and the ambiguous "they" does nothing to help. For instance, I might say "Dobermans can be domesticated even while they are puppies." In other words, they can be domesticated even under these particular circumstances. (B) avoids that oddly-placed modifier and the unclear "they."
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2015, 07:40
DmitryFarber wrote:
"Even while" is not quite right--it implies that these things are happening at the same time, when the point is to make a clear contrast. However, even if we used "even though," we would not have a great answer choice. Notice that the sentence ends with the unclear "might be." We know the intention is "might be domesticated," but it's better to choose a sentence that makes the point more clearly.

For me, though, the worst part is "domesticated even while." We seem to be modifying "domesticated" instead of the belief, and the ambiguous "they" does nothing to help. For instance, I might say "Dobermans can be domesticated even while they are puppies." In other words, they can be domesticated even under these particular circumstances. (B) avoids that oddly-placed modifier and the unclear "they."


Hello Dmitry,

I still have one doubt about option B.

Years of business writing has trained me to avoid using 'the same ' in a sentence. Is it ok to use it in this sentence then?

Many people, willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pincher might be fully domesticated, are unwilling to believe the same of pit bulls.

Looking forward to your help.

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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2015, 21:57
Hi aimtoteach,

I must confess I've never heard the advice to avoid saying "the same." That seems kind of strange as a blanket recommendation. In fact, the most common way to use the word "same" is with "the" in front of it. Can you give me an example of the kind of usage you were trained to avoid?
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2015, 22:36
DmitryFarber wrote:
Hi aimtoteach,

I must confess I've never heard the advice to avoid saying "the same." That seems kind of strange as a blanket recommendation. In fact, the most common way to use the word "same" is with "the" in front of it. Can you give me an example of the kind of usage you were trained to avoid?



Hello Dmitry,

In business writing, I have been told to avoid 'the same' usage in the following manner:

1) The internet service will not be available from 9 am IST; the same will be reinstated from 10 am IST today.
2) The expense claim form has been updated for all future submissions, the same is enclosed for your reference.

I believe there is a lot of unlearning I have to do :(


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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2015, 00:31
Ah, I see. I suppose it's a matter of style, but the expression works here. I can't say I've seen it in any official GMAT problems, but I suppose it could crop up.
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2015, 02:34
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If you start with a comparison such as "Unlike X," you need to make sure that the item you're comparing comes along next (not counting any modifiers in the middle). Take out the modifier and look at what is getting compared here:

"Unlike German shepherds and Doberman pinschers, such belief . . . " We don't want to compare dogs to belief!
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2015, 00:12
The issue isn't what word goes with "same." It's what ideas you're comparing:

My parents paid for my brother's education, and I want them to do the same for me.

I think highly of my business partners, and I want them to think the same of me.


In the case of the original question, the idiom is "believe X of Y":

I can accept that the other kids lied, but I can't believe this of my daughter.

Does that make sense?
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2015, 01:58
Hi,

The options clearly boil down to between B and D. But I selected D over B and here are my two cents:

In option B: The reference is made to people who are willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be fully domesticated.

Now as per the real sentence the people is refered to generally and not specifically the lot "who are willing to believe". IMO option B changes the meaning.

In option D:
I can see that "they" is ambiguous however it does not make sense to say "the bulls" are willing to believe... How does anyone think that "the bulls" will believe?? :shock:

Hence I went with B. :oops: Please correct me if I am wrong.

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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2018, 04:42
tarek99 wrote:
Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an unwillingness on the part of many people to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated.


a) Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an unwillingness on the part of many people to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated

b) Many people, willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be fully domesticated, are unwilling to believe the same of pit bulls.

c) Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, pit bulls bring out an unwillingness in many people to believe that they might be fully domesticated.

d) Many people are unwilling to believe that pit bulls might be fully domesticated even while they are willing to believe that German shepherds and Doberman pinchers might be.

e) Unlike German shepherds and Doberman pinchers, which many people are willing to believe can be fully domesticated, such belief does not extend to pit bulls.


KAPLAN OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



The sentence sets up a comparison between Dobermans and German shepherds on one hand and pit bulls on the other. The beginnings of the choices give you a standard 3-2 split, so start with the choices beginning Unlike since there are three of them. (A) and (E) don't compare dogs to dogs so eliminate them. The remaining three choices create grammatically correct parallels, but (C) and (D) are wordier and less active than (B), so (B) is the best bet. We'll discuss active and passive voices later on.
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 02:31
DmitryFarber wrote:
"Even while" is not quite right--it implies that these things are happening at the same time, when the point is to make a clear contrast. However, even if we used "even though," we would not have a great answer choice. Notice that the sentence ends with the unclear "might be." We know the intention is "might be domesticated," but it's better to choose a sentence that makes the point more clearly.

For me, though, the worst part is "domesticated even while." We seem to be modifying "domesticated" instead of the belief, and the ambiguous "they" does nothing to help. For instance, I might say "Dobermans can be domesticated even while they are puppies." In other words, they can be domesticated even under these particular circumstances. (B) avoids that oddly-placed modifier and the unclear "they."


DmitryFarber , AjiteshArun

I eliminated B because it says "the same of pitbulls". Shouldn't it be " The same for pitbulls??" Please help
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 19:40
Prateek176 wrote:
DmitryFarber , AjiteshArun

I eliminated B because it says "the same of pitbulls". Shouldn't it be " The same for pitbulls??" Please help
Although it could sound "off", the same of is a valid structure. Here are a couple of examples to help you develop a feel for this phrase:

South Korea is unlikely to start a conflict, but we cannot say the same of North Korea.
This means that North Korea is likely to start a conflict.

We are ready to consider an alternate supplier. Can we say the same of the other team?
This means that we are not sure that the other team is also ready to consider an alternate supplier.

Finally, here is the official question that this question is based on.
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Re: Unlike German shepherds or Doberman pinchers, there is an &nbs [#permalink] 11 Aug 2018, 19:40
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